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Utah's Canning Industry

List of Canneries and Canning Companies

This page was last updated on September 4, 2018.

(Return To The Canning Page)

(A large portion of this research was completed in August 1989, and became the basis for an article originally published in Utah History Encyclopedia, University of Utah Press, 1994, ISBN 0-87480-425-6, pages 67-70) (Read the updated text here)

(Unless noted, this information is taken from the research of William W. Terry, manuscripts on file in Weber University special collections.)

Members of the Utah Canners Association, 1915:

Member of the Utah Canners Association, 1918:

Members of the Utah Canners Association, 1924:

Members of Utah Canning Crops Association, 1943:

Utah Canning Men -- Information about the men who organized and operated canning companies in Utah.

Adams Nursery and Tin Can Manufacturers

1900 - 1902 (1903)

Ogden, Weber County

The following comes from William Terry's "The Canning Industry In Weber County," 1983:

In 1900 the Adams Nursery and Tin Can Manufacturers Company opened for business on "west 24th street near County Road". with W. J. Menzies as president. Mr. Menzies guided this company through its formative years. The extension of 24th street to the south-west and now called Pennsylvania was County Road.

The Adams company constructed a brick building, which is still extant, in which they not only made tin cans, but they also installed canning equipment after a year or two.

In 1903, the company was reorganized and took the name of Wasatch Gardens and Orchard Canning Company, with Menzies still as president and William Van Alen as general manager. The reorganization did not affect the operations as cans were still made there as well as the canning of vegetables and fruits. As the name implies, they canned both fruits and vegetables, in fact, this plant was the first cannery in the county as a processor of fruits.

Associated Canners, Incorporated

(1941 to 1942)

Ogden, Weber County

"A company by the name of Associated Canners Incorporated is listed in the Ogden City directory as being located in the same building as the Olson Canning on Pacific avenue for the years 1941-1942." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

Banner Canning Company

1904 - 1918

Ogden, Weber County, Utah

At the same location, at 21st Street and Reeves Ave., there was Ogden Canning (1902-1904), then Banner Canning (1904-1918), then Van Alen Canning (1918-1928), then Rocky Mountain Packing (1928 to end of 1938 season). (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

"Two years after the Ogden Canning Company of A. C. McKinney terminated its operations in 1902, the Banner Canning Company was organized and opened for business in the old building "on 21st street opposite Reeves Ave." Wm. Van Alen, who had been associated with the Wasatch Orchard and Canning Co. in West Ogden, was president of this new company. The following year Thomas Leslie was named secretary and treasurer." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

Ben Lomond Orchard Company

(see also McGriff Canning Co.)

1912 - (1945)

North Ogden, Weber County

Blackinton and Son Canning Company

1941 - 1971

Ogden, Weber County

"E. R. Blackinton was manager of the Royal Canning on 31st for the years 1937-1939. In 1941 the Blackinton Canning Company was listed at Mr. Blackinton's home, 512 Lincoln avenue. The following year the company was in full production at 127-7th street where it had constructed a new factory. This company remained in business at this address for thirty years (1942-1972)." Not located near to a fruit and vegetable growing areas, which affected the company's ability to buy product to process. Not located next to a railroad, which affected the company's ability to market its products. (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

Box Elder Packing Corporation

1934-1960 (2 plants)

Purchased former Brigham City Canning company.

June 16, 1934
"Plant Starts Cherry Season -- Factory, Recently Bought, Begins Work; Other To Run Later -- Brigham City, June 16 -- The Box Elder Packing corporation, which recently purchased two canning factories belonging to the Brigham City Canning company, commenced operations Friday morning, canning cherries at the south plant. Albert T. Smith, of the Smith Canning company, Clearfield, has the plant in charge and Dan L. Ross, from West Point Canning company, is superintendent. T. D. Birchall is in charge of the office and O. S. Ramsey is general field supprintendent and is signing up growers and establishing contacts. The north plant will be put in operation in the fall, canning peaches and tomatoes." (Ogden Standard Examiner, June 16, 1934)

February 28, 1960
"And at Brigham City, the Box Elder Packing Corp., mainly concerned with peas, corn and tomatoes, closed its facility to concentrate on another operation at Pendleton, Oregon." (Salt Lake Tribune, February 28, 1960)

Brigham City Canning Company

1903 - 1934 [1910, 1919 (2 plants), 1924 (2 plants)]

Brigham City, Box Elder County

Organized in February 1903, with Utah Canning company taking a half interest. Factory located in Brigham City on the west side of the OSL tracks, just north of the OSL depot. (Deseret Evening News, February 17, 1903; Ogden Daily Standard, March 13, 1903)

In 1907, Brigham City Canning company was one of three canneries in Box Elder County: Brigham City Canning company; Willard Canning company; and Rocky Mountain Canning company. (Salt Lake Tribune, September 3, 1907)

February 27, 1908
Brigham City Canning company was incorporated as a combination of the previous Brigham City Canning company, and the previous Rocky Mountain Canning company. (Salt Lake Herald Republican, September 28, 1908)

The Brigham City Canning company was organized by John L. Pierce, son of Issac N. Pierce, of Utah Canning company. John L. Pierce, a bachelor and still shown as manager of the Brigham City Canning company, was found dead of two self-inflicted gunshot wounds, on July 27, 1932. The reason for the suicide was investigated and determined to be ill health and business reverses. (Salt Lake Telegram, July 27, 1932)

(Both factories sold to Box Elder Packing Corp., in June 1934; see above.)

Cache Valley Condensed Milk Company

Logan, Cache County, Utah

California Packing Corporation, Mountain States Division

(see Utah Packing Corporation)

Capital Pickle Company

Salt Lake City (1 plant)

Lehi, Utah County (1 receiving station 100 feet by 30 feet; with five vats)

Springville, Utah County (1 receiving station)

Kaysville, Davis County (1 receiving station 100 feet by 36 feet; with five vats) (1906 season only)

January 19, 1906
Mount Pickle began remodeling an old soap factory in Salt Lake City as a pickle works. Not yet incorporated. The cucumbers needed to make pickles were to be contracted with farmers in Davis, Salt Lake and Utah counties. (Deseret Evening News, January 19, 1906, "today")

March 28, 1906
Mount Pickle Company was incorporated, with C. W. Mount of Denver as the president. (Salt Lake Herald, March 29, 1906, "yesterday")

May 12, 1906
Work had begun on a "salting station" for the Mount Pickle Company near the Lehi station of the "Salt Lake Route." The work includes large sheds covering ten large vats. Thirty by 100 feet. (Emery County Progress, May 12, 1906; Salt Lake Telegram, May 14, 1906; Lehi Banner, June 7, 1906)

The first stage of the pickling process loaded fresh cucumbers into large salting vats at receiving stations as a prelimiary preservation process; then loading into railroad cars for shipment to a central pickle factory where the semi-finished pickles were finished in large vats.

August 2, 1906
The Springville receiving station of the Mount Pickle company had started receiving cucumbers. (Lehi Banner, August 2, 1906)

April 8, 1912
Stockholders of Mount Pickle Company met to approve a name change to Capital Pickle Company, retaining J. B. Cosgriff as company president. (Salt Lake Tribune, April 7, 1912)

September 5, 1914
Lehi plant of Capital Pickle company to its capacity doubled. (Lehi Banner, September 5, 1914)

March 13, 1915
Stockholders of Capital Pickle were to meet to approve the lease of its Salt Lake City plant to Goddard Pickle and Preserve company. (Salt Lake Tribune, February 27, 1915)

March 26, 1919
By March 1919, the Capital Pickle Company shown as being delinquent on its corporate taxes. (Salt Lake Tribune, March 26, 1919)

(see Goddard Packing Company)

Chief Canning Company

1908 - ?

Plain City, Weber County

"In 1908 another cannery was constructed in Plain City, this one was built by the North Ogden Canning and was located at 1975 north and 4650 west which plant was given the name of the Chief Canning Company. Later the name was changed to the Plain City Canning. The old building is still extant as of the 1980s." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

Clearfield Canning Company

1907 - 1912

Clearfield, Davis County

Colorado & Utah Canning Company

1887-1890 (pioneer Lundy cannery, unincorporated)

1890-1892 (Utah Canning Company, first)

1892-1897 (Colorado & Utah Canning Company)

1897-1960 (Utah Canning Company, second)

Ogden, Weber County

(see Utah Canning Company, first)

Davis County Canning Company

1912 - 1914

Syracuse, Davis County

Del Monte

(See Utah Packing Corp.)

Draper Canneries Company

(1913-1927) (1 factory)

Draper Canneries company in operation since 1913. (Salt Lake Telegram, June 12, 1927; "in operation about 14 years"; American Fork Citizen, March 14, 1914)

1927
Consolidated along with four other companies, operating seven canneries, to become Rocky Mountain Packing Corporation.

Merger first proposed in March 1927, with a special meetings of the stockholders of the various companies scheduled for April 19, 1927.

The lack of apparent newspaper coverage after the 1927 merger suggests that the Draper cannery was closed soon after.

Ephraim Sanitary Canning Company

1920-1927 (2 factories)

Ephraim and Manti

Ephraim Sanitary Canning Company in operation since 1920. (Salt Lake Telegram, June 12, 1927; "in operation about seven years")

The Ephraim plant had operated since 1914, and the Manti plant had operated since 1929. (Ogden Standard Examiner, May 4, 1952, upon the announcement that the two plants would close)

Consolidated along with four other companies, operating seven canneries, to become Rocky Mountain Packing Corporation.

(see also Rocky Mountain Packing company)

Everfresh Food Company

1916 - 1919

Ogden, Weber County

"The Everfresh Food Company on Wall avenue "between 20th and 21st" (1916-1919) had as its founders an interesting combination: A. P. Biglow, financier and president of the Ogden State Bank, was president, (we saw him earlier in the Ben Lomond Orchard Co.) W. H. Wattis an international industrialist, a builder of railroads in the U.S.A and Mexico and other important construction projects was vice-president, Frederick G. Taylor of the Amalgamated Sugar Company, secretary and treasurer. In 1917 they brought into their organization Wm. J. "Jake" Parker, whom we have already met, as manager. Mr. Parker remained with the Everfresh Co. until it folded in 1919." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

July 23, 1915
Everfresh Food Company was incorporated. (Salt Lake Tribune, July 23, 1915, "today")

July 2, 1919
The Everfresh Food Company canning factory was burned when a grass fire in an adjacent field got out of control. The grass fire was later found to be started by several boys who were known as "firebugs." (Ogden Daily Standard, July 2, 1919)

G. A. Craig

1906

Ogden, Weber County

"In 1906 the G. A. Craig Company made its entrance in the canning business at 2230 Wall Ave. with a one year stand. This company occupied a small corner in the Ogden Ice Company at that address." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

Garden City Canning Company

1901-1914?

Provo, Utah County

1901
The following comes from the December 17, 1904 issue of the Deseret Evening News:

There is but one cannery in the county, that of the Garden City Canning company on Provo Bench, which was started about three years ago by the fruit growers in Provo Bench to enable them to conserve such fruit as they were unable to market. The company which is composed of N. J. Knight, John S. Park and Samuel Cordner, also operates a small evaporating plant. The capacity of the canning factory is 2,000 cans a day, and this year the output exceeded the calculated limit of the plant. The company packed 2,500 cases of tomatoes, 1,000 cases table fruit and 1,000 cases of pie fruit.

The capital of the company will be increased and the capacity of the plant trippled for next year, when they also expect to be able to turn out about 20,000 pounds of evaporated fruit, and it is then doubtful whether they can take care of the fruit produced on the bench, which is the district conveniently tributary to the cannery. The company has experienced some difficulty in getting the farmers to grow as many tomatoes as the factory could profitably handle, but it is believed this will be overcome next year and that more farmers will grow tomatoes which has proved a very profitable crop else where. The company has had no difficulty in marketing its product, which is of very superior quality, and why should it have difficulty while large quantities of canned fruit are annually imported from California.

"The Garden City Canning Company on Provo bench is now running its factory to full capacity, working on the peach and pear crop. Twenty-three people are employed by the institution." (Deseret News, September 11, 1902)

December 28, 1904
The Garden City Canning Company was incorporated in Utah. (Salt Lake Telegram, December 28, 1904)

March 19, 1908
Garden City Canning company was consolidated with Provo Canning company. "The Knight company will enlarge the plant and carry on a general canning business." (Deseret Evening News, March 19, 1908)

July 19, 1910
Jesse Knight took control of the Garden City Canning company, with canning plants on the Provo bench, and in Provo, and became company president at the same time. The changes took effect on August 22nd when the company was reorganized with new board of directors and a doubling of its stock. (Salt Lake Tribune, July 19, 1910; Salt Lake Herald Republican, August 22, 1910)

(see Provo Canning company, 1888-1910)

September 21, 1912
Mrs. Caroline B. Seymour of New York became manager of the Springville Canning company to supervise its production using her methods found to be successful in the East. She had also made arrangements with the Garden City Canning company in Provo for that company to furnish several carloads of Utah peaches for the eastern markets. (Salt Lake Telegram, September 21, 1912)

March 22, 1918
By March 1918, the Garden City Canning company was shown as being delinquent on its corporate taxes. (Salt Lake Tribune, March 22, 1918)

April 21, 1946
"Pleasant Grove Canning company has purchased some of the machinery of the Garden City Canning company in Provo." (Provo Sunday Herald, April 21, 1946)

Geneva Canning Company

(see Utah Fish Canning company)

1937-1938

(Geneva, north end of Utah Lake)

Goddard Pickle and Preserve Company

1912 - 1917

Ogden, Weber County

(see Goddard Packing company)

Goddard Packing Company

1917-1922

(Read more about George W. Goddard)

Ogden, Utah (1 plant)

Salt Lake City (1 plant)

Provo (1 plant)

Walton's "The Utah Canning Industry" history shows the Goddard Packing Company as having two plants in 1919. (Walton, p. 16)

April 24, 1910
Rose Preserving Company filed its articles of incorporation in Utah on April 24, 1910, with James C. Rose as president and George W. Goddard as vice president. The purpose was to take over the Utah Vinegar and Pickle Works of Ogden. the company was organized on April 13, 1910. (Salt Lake Herald Republican, April 24, 1910; Salt Lake Tribune, November 15, 1912)

May 25, 1912
"George W. Goddard, recently of Salt Lake City, has purchased the controlling interest in the Goddard Pickling & Preserve company. Under reorganization of the company Mr. Goddard becomes president and general manager." (Ogden Standard Examiner, May 25, 1932, "20 Years Ago")

November 15, 1912
Rose Preserving Company changed its name to Goddard Pickle and Preserve Company after George W. Goddard took control of the company from J. C. Rose. In November 1912, Goddard sued for trademark infringement over the use of the "Rose" trademark by Rose Pickle and Vinegar Company after J. C. Rose and J. T. Keith organized the latter company on August 1, 1912. The suit was filed by Goddard after Keith had filed with the secratary of state's office on May 29, 1912 to register the Rose trademark for the Rose company, complaining that the Goddard company had been very successful in its business before and after the name change, using brands including "Rose," "Rose Brand," and "Rose's" and should be allowed exclusive use of the Rose as its trademark. A restraining order in favor of the Goddard company was issued by the court in March 1913. The decision was rendered by the court in May 1914, in the favor of George Goddard's company, with the Rose company being restrained from using an image of a rose, or the name, for any of its products. (Salt Lake Tribune, November 15, 1912; Salt Lake Herald Republican, March 26, 1913; Ogden Standard, May 7, 1914)

August 1913
The Goddard Pickle and Preserve company completed its new factory at Twentieth Street and Lincoln Avenue in August 1913. In March 1913, the company asked Ogden City for permission to build a railroad spur across Wall Avenue to serve a new canning plant it was planning to build at the site. A building permit was issued on April 12, 1913 for the building itself, at a reported cost of $40,500. (Ogden Standard, March 19, 1913; April 12, 1913; August 27, 1913, "recently completed")

February 11, 1915
Goddard Pickle and Preserve company bought the Capital Pickle company in Salt Lake City, located on Third West between Seventh and Eighth South. Capitol Pickle "had a local and international business amounting to more than $100,000 per year." (Salt Lake Tribune, February 11, 1915, "yesterday")

June 26, 1917
Goddard Pickle and Preserve Company was changed to Goddard Packing Company at a special stockholders meeting planned for June 5, 1917, but delayed until June 26th. The company also increased its stock, and increased its board of directors, and changed its officers. (Ogden Standard, June 5, 1917; June 27, 1917)

The name of the company was changed in 1917 to the Goddard Packing Corporation - "manufacturers of pickles, vinegar, fancy canned specialties, mincemeat and condiments." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

December 20, 1917
George Goddard announced that the Goddard Packing company had 1400 acres of vegetables under contract in the Provo area for the 1918 season. (Salt Lake Tribune, December 20, 1917)

August 24, 1917
Goddard Packing company purchased six acres of land in Provo to build a new canning plant, located on the north side of west Center Street, east of the railroad tracks. (Salt Lake Tribune, August 25, 1917)

June 14, 1918
The Goddard Packing company plant at Provo had its formal opening on the evening of June 14, 1918. (Salt Lake Tribune, June 16, 1918)

June 16, 1918
"Without exception, Goddard Packing company is the largest producer of canned goods in the Intermountain West."

June 21, 1918
The Provo plant of Goddard Packing company began operations. The Provo plant had a daily capacity of 2000 cases of tomatoes, 2000 cases of peas, 800 cases of string beans, 1000 cases of bottled catsup, 500 cases of sweet corn, and four tons of cherries. The company had 3000 acres of vegetables and fruit under contract for the 1918 season. (Salt Lake Tribune, June 16, 1918)

August 22, 1920
George W. Goddard, of Goddard Packing company, was indicted by a federal grand jury for his involvement with Utah-Idaho Sugar company on a sugar speculation and price-fixing scheme and "profiteering," in violation of the Lever Act (Food and Fuel Control Act of 1917). (Salt Lake Telegram, August 22, 1920)

The indictments were for the violation of two sections of the Food and Fuel Control Act of 1917: Section 4 (limiting or restriction of manufacturing or distribution of "necessaries") and Section 5 (importing, manufacturing or distribution of "necessaries" without a license). The Food and Fuel Control Act had been enacted in response to the need to control products found necessary to the war effort. One of the provisions of the Food and Fuel Control Act was to limit profits during the war, but in February 1920, a federal court found the act's language to be vague and uncertain, and therefore unconstitutional. In 1921 the U. S. Supreme Court found the price controls to be unconstitutional, and the provisions of the act were repealed by Congress on March 3, 1921. The indictments against the sugar company and its officers, and others in Utah, were dismissed in April 1921. (parts from Ogden Standard Examiner, April 21, 1921) (Read the Wikipedia article about the Lever Act)

September 8, 1920
A receiver was appointed for the Goddard Packing company, which stated that it was unable to pay its a debt of $6,000 owed to the First National Bank of Ogden, as part of its overall indebtedness of more than $100,000. Its stated worth was in excess of $200,000. All of its property, including plants in Ogden, Salt Lake City and Provo, were subject to a mortgage dated April 1, 1918. The company had been unable to sell its finished canned goods due to unstable market conditions, reportedly due to the U. S. government "dumping" its inventory stockpiled during the recent war. George W. Goddard, president of the company, in asking for the appointment of a receiver, remarked, "The whole affair is the result of a series of misfortunes coupled with the tight money market of the present." (Ogden Standard Examiner, September 8, 1920)

June 4, 1921
The federal court ordered that the assets of the Goddard Packing Company be sold at auction to satisfy the company's debts. Auction to be held on June 25th. (Ogden Standard Examiner, June 5, 1921)

October 16, 1921
The Goddard Packing company's pickle works at 741 South Third West (400 West) in Salt Lake City burned and was destroyed by a fire of unknown origin, causing $21,000 in damages. (Salt Lake Telegram, October 17, 1921, "yesterday")

January 28, 1922
National Packing Corporation was organized to take over the factories of the Goddard Packing company of Ogden, Salt Lake and Provo. The articles of incorporation had been filed with the office of the county clerk. (Ogden Standard Examiner, January 28, 1922)

In the early twenties Mr. Goddard became involved in supplying factories and mills with such items as belts, pulleys, bearings, shafts etc. from his place of business at 2410 Wall avenue where he was listed as "manufacturers agent". The pickle works was soon phased out. (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

(see National Packing Corporation)

Hillcrest Canning Company

1914 - 1934

Roy, Weber County

"In 1912 Joseph Wright and Horace Wittier had built a cannery on the east side of Roy on the main highway from Ogden to Salt Lake City, which is now Utah State highway 126. They operated this plant for two years at that location after which time (in 1914) they constructed a plant at 33rd and Pacific Ave. in Ogden where they continued in the canning business until 1923. When the Wright-Wittier company moved to Ogden (in 1914) it left the Roy building vacant for a few years. When the combination of the two Jones brothers was dissolved (in 1920) Oscar Jones moved his operations to the abandoned (Wright-Wittier) building on the highway. Oscar Jones called his cannery at this location the Hillcrest Canning Company. (Hillcrest operated until the end of the 1928 season.)" (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

(Hooper, Utah canneries)

Three canneries in Hooper:

#1

#2

#3

Hunt Foods, Inc.

(see Rocky Mountain Packing company, below)

(Hyrum, Utah green bean cannery)

Sold to Utah Packing Company in 1930. (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

Or, sold to Utah Packing Company in spring 1928. (Those Good Peas)

Jones Canning Company

1924 (1 plant)

Roy, Weber County

Kaysville Canning Company

1902 - 1914

Kaysville, Davis County

Organized in March 1902. (Davis County Book of Deeds P, p. 508, 509)

In November 1908 and in May 1910, the company purchased property in (Southeast quarter of Section 33, T4N, R1W) from John R. Barnes. (Davis County Book of Deeds C, p. 249; Book of Deeds E, p. 91)

Reorganized as the Kaysville Canning Corporation in April 1914. (Kaysville, pp. 112, 115)

Kaysville Canning Corporation

1914 - (?) [1919 (2 plants), 1924 (2 plants), 1936 (2 plants)]

Kaysville, Davis County

Syracuse, Davis County (1914-1964)

Syracuse, Davis County (1918-1945)

June 23, 1959
"Seven Utah plants will not open this summer and other canners are expressing reluctance to schedule a normal operation because of the current marketing situation. This outlook was reported by canning firm officials today as the 1959 season started to get under way with the annual pea harvest. Plants which will not operate this year include the two large Hunt Foods plants in Tremonton and Murray, two Kaysville Canning Co. plants, Royal Canning Co. plant, the Eddington Canning Co. plant in Springville, California Packing Corp.'s Franklin, Idaho plant and the Smith Canning Co. plant in Brigham City. "The tomato and pea acreage in Utah has declined significantly during the past two years because of adverse economic conditions which have made canning operations a highly risky business," said W. C. Druebl, manager of California Packing Corp.'s Mountain States Division." (Ogden Standard Examiner, June 23, 1959)

Layton Canning Company

1903 - 1912

Lehi Canning Company

1917

Lehi, Utah County

Served by Salt Lake & Utah Railroad. (Salt Lake Telegram, July 7, 1917)

McGriff Canning Company

(see also Ben Lomond Orchard Co.)

1910 - 1912

North Ogden, Weber County

The following comes from William Terry's "The Canning Industry In Weber County," 1983:

Edwin G. McGriff moved from Des Moines, Iowa to North Ogden in 1897. He purchased more than 80 acres of bench land to the north of town and there planted peach, cherry and pear trees as well as a grape vineyard.

By 1901, Mr. McGriff's orchards were producing so well that he shipped the first carload of fruit out of North Ogden via railroad, a carload of peaches to Nebraska. This was the beginning of a very lucrative business for the area.

The next year McGriff joined Scott Campbell and James Storey in organizing the McGriff Fruit Company. They built a large packing house and shipping shed at 2409 north 400 east. In just a year or two there was an average of 125 carloads of Elberta peaches shipped to Nebraska, Missouri and Illinois.

In 1910 the McGriff enterprises organized a canning company and sold stock to the amount of $225, 000 with headquarters in Salt Lake City. E. G. McGriff was president, H. M. Wells vice-president and treasurer, Thomas H. Cutler Jr. secretary, L. S. Hardy manager and as directors: Thomas R. cutler Sr. John Dern, Jas. E. Ballantyne, L. A. Hancock and Alma Eldredge. The makeup of the officers of the company, mainly financers from Salt Lake City, indicates to us that the fame of the canning business in Weber County was well noted by individuals outside of Ogden. They built their cannery on Ben Lomond Drive. The building is still standing.

"Whether sold in crates of preserved at the model canning factory under the 'Sanitary' or 'Idlewild' brands McGriff's fruit always commands the highest price. The cannery located on a spur of the Oregon Short Line, has a capacity of 40,000 cases. Bottling of grape juice is about to be undertaken on a large scale." (The Junction City, 1910, quoted in William Terry's The Canning Industry In Weber County)

This building was destroyed by fire in 1912 and never rebuilt.

In 1912 McGriff sold all his interests in North Ogden and left the community. A. P. Bigelow of the Ogden State Bank and others organized the Ben Lomond Orchard Company which included the canning plant. John T. Hall was appointed general manager of the company a position he held until 1945 at which time he retired.

Morgan Canning Company

1904 - 1928 [1924 (2 plants)]

Morgan, Morgan County (opened in 1908)

Smithfield, Cache County (opened in 1920)

July 30, 1928
Morgan Canning Company was sold to Utah Packing Corporation, a subsidiary of California Packing Corporation. (New York Times, July 31, 1928, "yesterday")

(see Utah Packing Corporation)

Mount Nebo Canning Company

1919

(location unknown)

Mount Pickle Company

Salt Lake City

Lehi, Utah County (receiving and salting station only)

(see Capital Pickle Company)

National Packing Corporation

Ogden, Utah (1 plant)

Provo (1 plant)

Earlier references to a "National Packing Company" of 1912-1914 in William Terry's history of canning in Weber County, have been found to be in error. There was a National Packing Company that was organized in Maine in 1907. This was a conglomerate of meat packing companies (Armour, Swift, Cudhay, etc.), and was under indictment as part of the "Beef Trust" investigations in 1910-1912. This meat packing holding company was dissolved by federal court order on Augusrt 1, 1912.

"In 1912 The National Packing Corporation (1912-1914) opened for business at 2005 Lincoln avenue. After two years this concern was succeeded at that location by the George W. Goddard Pickle Factory which in itself lasted there for eight years (1914-1922)." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

(see Goddard Packing company)

June 25,1921
All of the property of the Goddard Packing Company in Ogden and in Provo, including all products on hand, was sold at auction on the steps of the Weber County courthouse, as a result of a failed receivership of the company. (Ogden Standard Examiner, June 5, 1921)

January 28, 1922
National Packing Corporation was organized to take over the factories of the Goddard Packing company of Ogden, Salt Lake and Provo. The articles of incorporation had been filed with the office of the county clerk. (Ogden Standard Examiner, January 28, 1922)

Numerous want ads for workers showed the Ogden address as "20th and Lincoln."

The canning plant was directly west, and across Lincoln Avenue from the can factory of American Can Company. In January 1923, the Ogden city council approved the construction of an overhead can converyor between the can company, and the canning factory.

March 25, 1922
"Provo -- Canning factory to reopen for coming season's run." (Salt Lake Telegram, March 25, 1922)

June 4, 1926
National Packing Corp., with plants in Ogden and Provo, merged with Herbert Packing company of San Jose, California, and Pacific Coast Canning company of Oakland, to form the Pacific Coast Canners, Inc. (Oakland Tribune, June 4, 1926)

Pacific Coast Canners, Inc., was incorporated in Utah on August 9, 1926. (Ogden Standard Examiner, August 9, 1926, "today")

November 20, 1929
Earl L. Parker was shown as the superintendent of the Pacific Coast Canners at 1240 West Sixth South in Provo. (Provo Daily Herald, November 20, 1929)

The cannery was located on the north side of Center Street, along the east side of the Salt Lake & Utah tracks, which themselves were on the east side of both the D&RGW tracks and the Union Pacific tracks.

1930-1934
From July 1930 through February 1934, the Provo canning factory is shown as being operated by Pacific Coast Canners. An announcement was made in February 1934 that the cannery would possibly be run if the sewer system was extended to serve the cannery, an ongoing request since July 1930. (Provo Evening Herald, July 22, 1930; February 20, 1934)

October 23, 1930
"Utah county has located within its boundaries, several large modern fruit and vegetable packing plants. At Spanish Fork the Utah Packing corporation is served by a Salt Lake & Utah railroad spur, as is the Pacific Coast Canners, Inc., plant at Provo, and the Pleasant Grove Canning company at Orem. The Springville Canning company, Springville, Utah, also served by the same road, just completed this summer a large addition to their warehouse." (Springville Herald, October 23, 1930)

1932
The Ogden plant was closed in 1932: "In 1927 the Pacific Coast Canners opened for business in the former Goddard pickle factory at Lincoln and 20th with W. F. Rudger as president and general manager. Mr. Rudger moved to Provo in 1932 when this company, like a number of others, became the victim of the depression." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

August 1934
The cannery of Pacific Coast Canners on west Center Street was in full operation during the 1934 season. "We are one of the largest shippers of tomatoes in the United States." (Provo Daily Herald, August 12, 1934)

January 25, 1935
"Cannery Leased -- Pleasant Grove, Jan. 25. -- The H. W. Jacobs company has leased the Pacific Coast Canners' factory at Provo, and will put the building in condition to handle the tomato pack next season. Mr. Jacobs was formerly manager of the Pleasant Grove Canning company." (Ogden Standard Examiner, January 25, 1935)

H. W. Jacobs "took over the factory of Pacific Coast Canners, on Twelfth West, Provo, in January, and expects a good run there. They will can only tomatoes there this season." (Provo Evening Herald, April 22, 1935)

May 12, 1938
"Canning Plant in Provo to Be Sold -- The Provo canning plant was today purchased by the Pleasant Grove Canning company, according to word received from Clifford Wright, manager, who has been in San Francisco negotiating with the Pacific Coast Canners, former owners. During the past four years the factory, located at West Center street, has been leased by the H. W. Jacobs company. According to W. S. Chipman, president of the company, the new owners plan to replace old machinery with new canning units in time to handle this year's pea crop, and will operate during the tomato run." (Provo Daily Herald, May 12, 1938)

June 24, 1938
The Provo cannery was being operated under lease to the H. W. Jacobs company, as a joint venture between Pleasant Grove Canning company and Pacific Coast Canners. The cannery had recently had $23,000 in new equipment installed, and was processing peas, with a planned production of 50,000 to 60,000 cases of peas for the 1938 season. (American Fork Citizen, June 24, 1938)

August 12, 1938
"Pleasant Grove -- H. W. Jacobs will succeed the late Clifford L. Wright as general manager of Pleasant Grove Canning company, the board of directors said Thursday. Wesley N. Jense of Pleasant Grove will be treasurer and assistant secretary, and A. L. Cullimore of Provo, former Grove man, secretary. Mr. Jacobs was Manager from 1916 to 1927 prior to Mr. Wright's selection; he organized the H. W. Jacobs Canning company at Orem, continuing to operate the Orem and Provo plants until his new appointment. (Provo plant leased from Pacific Coast Canners.) J. D. Thorne will be retained as field superintendent, with Thomas Fenton, foreman of the Pleasant Grove plant. Thomas Jacobs will be Orem plant foreman; Thomas Hurst, Provo plant foreman, and Thomas Fenton, Pleasant Grove foreman. Company reports disclosed 1,000 tons each of beans and cherries were canned; the strawberry pack did not run as large as other years. The tomato run begins about August 20." (Provo Daily Herald, August 12, 1938)

North Ogden Canning Company

1900 - 1970 [1924 (1 plant), 1936 (2 plants)]

North Ogden, Weber County, Utah

North Ogden Canning Company incorporated on December 24, 1900. (Salt Lake Tribune, December 25, 1900, "yesterday")

Ogden Canning Company (first)

1888 - 1902

Ogden, Weber County

At the same location, at 21st Street and Reeves Ave., there was Ogden Canning (1902-1904), then Banner Canning (1904-1918), then Van Alen Canning (1918-1928), then Rocky Mountain Packing (1928 to end of 1938 season). (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

1890 season started August 15, 1890. (Salt Lake Herald, August 16, 1890, "yesterday")

Also referred to as "McKinney Canning company." (Ogden Standard, July 2, 1901)

Ogden Canning Company (second)

1911 - 1913

Ogden, Weber County

Ogden Ice Company

1940 to 1946

Ogden, Weber County

Ogden Packing and Provision Company

Ogden, Weber County, Utah

Olson Canning Company

1938 - 1942

Ogden, Weber County

Oscar Jones/Orson Fields

circa 1906, in Roy, 5855 South 3100 West

circa 1914, moved operations to old Wright-Whittier cannery, as Hillcrest Canning Company, closed in 1930's

circa early 1940's, opened another cannery at 820 West 25th Street, renamed in 1950 to Vel-Donna Canning Company, closed in 1951

Pacific Coast Canners, Inc.

1927 - 1932

Ogden, Weber County

Provo, Utah County

June 4, 1926
National Packing Corp., with plants in Ogden and Provo, merged with Herbert Packing company of San Jose, California, and Pacific Coast Canning company of Oakland, to form the Pacific Coast Canners, Inc. (Oakland Tribune, June 4, 1926)

(see National Packing Corporation)

Perry Canning Company

1917 - ? [1919, 1924 (1 plant), 1936, 1961]

Perry, Utah

Gage Beers Rodman was born on January 15, 1886, and died on April 22, 1950 at his home in Los Angeles, at age 64. He came to Ogden in 1910, and along with William Parker and Thomas Leslie, started canning companies that later became part of Rocky Mountain Packing Corporation. He joined Amalgamated Sugar Company in 1932, and moved to California in 1940. (Ogden Standard Examiner, April 24, 1950; obituary)

Plain City Canning Company

(years unknown)

Plain City, Weber County

Renamed from Chief Canning Company. (Terry-3, p. 24)

Pleasant Grove Canning Company

1916-1966

1919 (1 plant), 1924 (2 plants), 1936 (2 plants)

Orem, Utah County (1920-

Pleasant Grove, Utah County (1916-1966)

Production started at the Pleasant Grove factory in August 1916. (Salt Lake Telegram, August 7, 1916)

This is from Orem City's web site:

Pleasant Grove Canning Company

700 North Orem Boulevard

The first major industry to locate in Orem was the Pleasant Grove Canning Company. The plant was built at 325 West 700 North (currently Orem Boulevard) in 1919. This provided close proximity to the railroad that was located along Orem Boulevard. The cannery was owned and operated by the Pleasant Grove Canning Company, which had one other plant, in Pleasant Grove. The canning company was designed to provide an outlet for locally grown fruits and vegetables. Canned products included tomatoes, apples, cherries and strawberries.

During the 1930's the Pleasant Grove Canning Company was a major economic outlet for farmers' product at a time when there was little other industry around. During the "tomato pack" portion of the canning season, approximately one hundred people were employed at the plant. This had a positive effect on the local economy, infusing money into the economy which helped ease the hopelessness of the depression.

In an average year, the cannery took the tomato crops produced on the Provo Bench, as well as other areas, and processed up to 75,000 cases of tomato paste. The product was then sold to the Campbell Soup Company.

In 1972, the cannery was sold to Booth Distributing, Inc., a restaurant supply business, which used the building as a warehouse through the 1970's. Subsequent owners purchased the cannery but were unable to find a suitable commercial use for the  building. The building fell into disrepair and was demolished in 1993.

The present Cannery Cove Condominiums were built on the cannery site starting in 1997. They were named after the former Pleasant Grove Canning Co.

October 23, 1930
"Utah county has located within its boundaries, several large modern fruit and vegetable packing plants. At Spanish Fork the Utah Packing corporation is served by a Salt Lake & Utah railroad spur, as is the Pacific Coast Canners, Inc., plant at Provo, and the Pleasant Grove Canning company at Orem. The Springville Canning company, Springville, Utah, also served by the same road, just completed this summer a large addition to their warehouse." (Springville Herald, October 23, 1930)

July 12, 1935
At the Pleasant Grove Canning company, "On Tuesday morning the cannery whistle blew for the first time in four years and it was a glad sound. It meant employment for men and women. The canning of Royal Ann, Red Sour and Pie cheries began." (American Fork Citizen, July 12, 1935)

May 12, 1938
"Canning Plant in Provo to Be Sold -- The Provo canning plant was today purchased by the Pleasant Grove Canning company, according to word received from Clifford Wright, manager, who has been in San Francisco negotiating with the Pacific Coast Canneries, former owners. During the past four years the factory, located at West Center street, has been leased by the H. W. Jacobs company. According to W. S. Chipman, president of the company, the new owners plan to replace old machinery with new canning units in time to handle this year's pea crop, and will operate during the tomato run." (Provo Daily Herald, May 12, 1938)

August 12, 1938
"Pleasant Grove -- H. W. Jacobs will succeed the late Clifford L. Wright as general manager of Pleasant Grove Canning company, the board of directors said Thursday. Wesley N. Jense of Pleasant Grove will be treasurer and assistant secretary, and A. L. Cullimore of Provo, former Grove man, secretary. Mr. Jacobs was Manager from 1916 to 1927 prior to Mr. Wright's selection; he organized the H. W. Jacobs Canning company at Orem, continuing to operate the Orem and Provo plants until his new appointment. (Provo plant leased from Pacific Coast Canners.) J. D. Thorne will be retained as field superintendent, with Thomas Fenton, foreman of the Pleasant Grove plant. Thomas Jacobs will be Orem plant foreman; Thomas Hurst, Provo plant foreman, and Thomas Fenton, Pleasant Grove foreman. Company reports disclosed 1,000 tons each of beans and cherries were canned; the strawberry pack did not run as large as other years. The tomato run begins !about August 20." (Provo Daily Herald, August 12, 1938)

June 16, 1960
Utah Canning company and Pleasant Grove Canning company merged to form Utah Packers, Inc. The merger included the three plants of the Pleasant Grove company (Pleasant Grove, Orem and Provo), and the Ogden plant of the Utah Canning company. (Lehi Free Press, June 16, 1960)

August 3, 1967
The Pleasant Grove plant of the Pleasant Grove Canning company was sold in August 1967. Pleasant Grove Canning company had merged with Utah Canning company of Ogden in 1960 to form Utah Packers, Inc. The Pleasant Grove plant had been closed since June 30, 1966 when a boiler explosion stopped the pea canning production in the middle of the season. After the explosion, the building had only been used for warehouse storage. (Provo Daily Herald, July 1, 1966; Pleasant Grove Review, August 3, 1967)

(see Utah Packers, Inc.)

Provo Canning Company

1888-1938?

April 3, 1888
"The gentlemen engaged in the cannery business have organized under the title of The Provo Canning Company. Arrangements are being made for the purchase of a suitable engine, boiler and other requisites. They announce their readiness to contract for 375 tons of tomatoes, and in a few days the buildings will be in course of construction." (Utah Enquirer, April 3, 1888)

June 6, 1888
"Gabriel Huntsman arrived from the south on Sunday with three wagon loads of machinery for the cannery, which has been purchased by the Provo Canning Company. The machinery was unloaded at the factory and will be put in position as soon as the building is prepared to receive it, which will be within a few weeks." (Deseret News, June 6, 1888, citing the Provo American newspaper)

December 2, 1888
"The Provo Canning Company, the latest new industry at the Garden City, will make a very favorable report at the close of its first season's work." (Salt Lake Herald, December 2, 1888)

(There were very brief mentions of the Provo Canning company in newspapers in 1894 and 1897.)

February 25, 1906
"The committee of the Provo Canning company appointed to select a site for the plant has done so, deciding upon ground owned by Mrs. William Strong on Sixth South street between First and Second East streets. The location affords fne trackage facilities and is otherwise well adapted for the purpose. Work on the plant will begin at once." (Salt Lake Herald, February 25, 1906)

This location was served by the Salt Lake & Utah railroad.

May 22, 1906
"The Provo Canning company's new building is now nearly completed with all the machinery and equipments in place. The company will be prepared to turn out 25,000 cans every ten hours, and expects to make a good run on tomatoes, fruit and vegetables this season." (Deseret Evening News, May 22, 1906)

March 19, 1908
Garden City Canning company was consolidated with Provo Canning company. "The Knight company will enlarge the plant and carry on a general canning business." (Deseret Evening News, March 19, 1908)

(see Garden City Canning company)

April 27, 1916
The property of Provo Canning company was shown as delinquent for non-payment of special sewer district taxes, and was to be sold on May 29, 1916. (Provo Daily Herald, April 27, 1916)

Riverdale Canning Company

1902 - 1911

Riverdale, Weber County, Utah

(Read more about William J. "Jake" Parker)

Riverton Canning Company

1919, 1924 (1 plant)

Riverton, Salt Lake County

Served by Salt Lake & Utah Railroad. (Salt Lake Telegram, July 7, 1917)

Robins Canning Company

1941 to 1943

Roy, Weber County

"The Robins Canning Company in Roy, 1941-1943, joined the merry-go-round for three years with J. E. Firth as manager. Place of business, the old W. W. Craig plant in Roy." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

Rocky Mountain Canning Company

1907 -1908

Brigham City, Box Elder County

In 1907, Rocky Mountain Canning company, located one block south of the OSL depot in Brigham City, was one of three canneries in Box Elder County: Brigham City Canning company; Willard Canning company; and Rocky Mountain Canning company. (Salt Lake Tribune, September 3, 1907)

Organized by several stockholders of the Brigham City Canning Company. Operations sold to them in 1908. (Box Elder, p. 71)

February 27, 1908
Brigham City Canning company was incorporated as a combination of the previous Brigham City Canning company, and the previous Rocky Mountain Canning company. (Salt Lake Herald Republican, September 28, 1908)

Rocky Mountain Packing Company

1927 - 1945 (7 factories) (sold to Hunt Foods, Inc., in 1945)

Ogden, Weber County

At the same location, at 21st Street and Reeves Ave., there was Ogden Canning (1902-1904), then Banner Canning (1904-1918), then Van Alen Canning (1918-1928), then Rocky Mountain Packing (1928 to end of 1938 season). (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

"Rocky Mountain Packing Corporation was formed in May 1927." "The seven plants of the corporation are situated in Ogden, Murray, Tremonton, Roy, Ephraim, Manti, and Draper, Utah, and have an annual capacity of 1,100,000 cases of peas, Tomatoes, beans, and other vegetables." (Ogden Standard, June 16, 1927)

Five Utah canning companies were consolidated on Tuesday April 19, 1927, operating seven canneries, to become Rocky Mountain Packing Corporation.

Closing dates:

Rocky Mountain Packing Corporation was a consolidation in 1927 of five canning companies, operating seven canneries. By 1939 Rocky Mountain was operating five canneries in Murray, Tremonton, Manti, Ephraim and Ogden, having closed the plants at Draper and Roy. A look at the 1939 aerial photo of Ephraim shows that the cannery was on a spur along 1st North, between 2nd and 3rd West. The view in the Tribune photo is looking due east along 1st North. I am stumped as to why the Salt Lake Tribune would have a photo of the cannery in Ephraim. (Posted to Rails Through The Wasatch, Facebook, July 23, 2018; comments relating to posting a photo from the Salt Lake Tribune collection at Utah State Historical Society)

Rocky Mountain Packing started its 1938 pea campaign on June 18th, and was the first packer in Utah to use the new freezing process that was finding favor on the Pacific coast. The company would be operating five pea viners, and about one-sixth of the crop would be frozen. Along with peas, the company would freeze lima beans, string beans, and other vegetables. About 1 million pounds of frozen vegetables were produced. (Ogden Standard Examiner, June 14, 1938; January 8, 1939)

"Will Freeze Foods -- The Rocky Mountain Packing corporation, which only freezes products at its Ogden plant, is the only concern which will handle strawberries. Products which will be quick-frozen on a commercial basis this year include raspberries, cherries, peaches, apricots, peas, several varieties of beans, spinach and broccoli. Many of these were handled on an experimental basis last year. The California Packing corporation will enter the quick-freezing field this year with peas." (Ogden Standard Examiner, May 29, 1939)

July 25, 1945
"Salt Lake City, July 25 (AP) -- Hunt Foods, Inc„ fruit and vegetable canners on the Pacific coast, have acquired an interest in the Rocky Mountain Packing corporation, General manager J. J. Gimlin announced today. The coast corporation has plants in Washington, Oregon and California. Rocky Mountain owns five plants in Utah, at Murray, Tremonton, Manti, Ephraim and Ogden." (Ogden Standard Examiner, July 25, 1945)

July 25, 1945
Hunt Foods, Inc., bought controlling interest in Rocky Mountain Packing company. "Firm Buys Utah Cannery Stock -- Hunt Foods, Inc. Pacific coast fruit and vegetable canner, has purchased a large stock interest in the Rocky Mountain Packing Corp, which has five plants in Utah, located at Murray, Tremonton, Manti, Ephraim and Ogden, J. J. Gimlin, vice president and general manager, Rocky Mountain Packing Corp, said Wednesday." (Salt Lake Telegram, July 25, 1945)

September 21, 1945
Hunt Foods formally merged with Rocky Mountain Packing company as part of a larger merger of Hunt Foods, Inc., with California Conserving Company. The merged company kept the Hunt Foods, Inc. name. (Salt Lake Telegram, September 21, 1945)

Bought the two canneries in Murray, one of which was the Twin Peaks Canning Company. (Murray p. 295)

In mid February 1951, Hunt Foods announced the the Sanpete plants would operate during 1951. "Hunt Foods Inc. plants at Ephraim and Manti will operate at full capacity this season. Ephraim plant will handle peas and Manti plant will handle corn. Approximately 140,000 cases of peas and 90,000 cases of corn will be canned by the two plants. This will call for 1100 to 1200 acres of peas and 1000 or more acres of corn." (The [Nephi] Times-News, February 22, 1951)

By mid April, the final acreage under contract was 750 acres of peas, and 750 acres of corn, with the additional note that both the Ephraim and Manti plants would operate during the 1951 season, but at a reduced capacity. The pea season ended on August 7th, with 65,000 cases of peas being canned and shipped from the Ephraim plant. The best yield was 2-1/2 tons of peas per acre. The corn season would begin at the Manti plant on August 10th, and would continue through the end of September. (Manti Messenger, April 13, 1951; August 10, 1951)

May 1, 1952
On late April the Ephraim and Manti plants of Hunt Foods were reported as being for sale, and the contracts to growers were on hold pending the outcome of "certain" negoiations. On May 1st, Hunt Foods announced that the two plants would no longer operate because the company wanted to concentrate on fruit tomatos products. The eight permanent employees at each plant were told that after May 15th, they were free to seek other employment, or be transferred to the company's plants in Murray or Tremonton. (Manti Messenger, April 25, 1952; May 2, 1952)

The Ephraim plant had operated since 1914, and the Manti plant had operated since 1929. (Ogden Standard Examiner, May 4, 1952)

August 1, 1952
Concerning the closing of the Ephraim and Manti plants, and how important they were to the local economy. "But even in recent years employment at the two plants has averaged 80 men and 80 women during the canning season with some 6 to 8 persons being employed on a year-round basis. Last year approximately $100,000 was paid in wages and salaries. In addition 14 local trucks and 10 local tractors were hired by the company to do various jobs in planting, growing and harvesting the peas and corn. This does not include hirings by individual growers. The plants consumed around 500 tons of coal, mostly from local mines, and each plant paid approximately $2500 for water and electric power to each Manti and Ephraim last year. Farmers were paid about $63,000 for peas and about the same for corn." (Manti Messenger, August 1, 1952; describing the efforts to raise the $75,000 needed to purchase the plants from Hunt Foods.)

April 1, 1954
Hunt Foods anounced that they would not contract for tomatoes at the Tremonton for the 1954 season, but that the pea crop would be contracted as previous years. The company also stated that the Tremonton plant was for sale. (The Garland Times Leader, April 1, 1954)

During the 1955 season, Hunt Foods took in peas and tomatoes at the Tremonton plant, and peas and tomatoes and apricots at the Murray plant.

July 1, 1958
Hunt Foods' Tremonton plant started its pea campaign early due to warm weather, and was processing 100 cases per day. The peas were coming from 650 acres in the Bear River Valley, which were producing about 2-1/2 tons per acre. Double shifts were to begin at the plant in the first week of July. (Ogden Standard Examiner, July 1, 1958)

October 1, 1958
Hunt Foods of Utah was included in a consolidation of all of Hunt Foods' subsidiaries on October 1, 1958 that formed a new parent company, Hunt Foods and Industries, Inc. (Ogden Standard Examiner, October 9, 1958)

February 28, 1959
Hunt Foods announced that it would close its Murray and Tremonton plants. The Tremonton plant was to be used as a warehouse. (Ogden Standard Examiner, March 1, 1959, "yesterday")

The Murray plant was located at 4800 South and West Temple, just south of the Union Pacific Murray depot, on the east side of the tracks. It has its own spur.

June 23, 1959
"Seven Utah plants will not open this summer and other canners are expressing reluctance to schedule a normal operation because of the current marketing situation. This outlook was reported by canning firm officials today as the 1959 season started to get under way with the annual pea harvest. Plants which will not operate this year include the two large Hunt Foods plants in Tremonton and Murray, two Kaysville Canning Co. plants, Royal Canning Co. plant, the Eddington Canning Co. plant in Springville, California Packing Corp.'s Franklin, Idaho plant and the Smith Canning Co. plant in Brigham City. "The tomato and pea acreage in Utah has declined significantly during the past two years because of adverse economic conditions which have made canning operations a highly risky business," said W. C. Druebl, manager of California Packing Corp.'s Mountain States Division." (Ogden Standard Examiner, June 23, 1959)

February 10, 1960
The following comes from the Ogden Standard Examiner, February 10, 1960:

"Firm Gives Tremonton $168,000 Food Plant -- Tremonton -- The old Hunt Foods plant here was given to the city of Tremonton today. Deeds to the plant and other property, valued at $168,000, was presented to Mayor Reed Giles by D. J. Isom, former division manager of Hunt Food's Utah plants. The plant was closed at the end of the 1957 [sic] season. It had been purchased from the Rocky Mountain Packing Corp. in 1946 and used to pack peas and tomato sauce. The gift includes all of the company plant and property, located in Tremonton including machinery, equipment, fixtures, water rights and other property. They gift was made without restriction, Mr. Isom said, and the city has freedom to make use of the properties or sell or lease them. Hunt plants in Ephraim and Manti were given to those cities following their closing in 1958."

May 12, 1960
"The city council Monday night voted to sell all viner equipment at the city-owned Hunt Food Cannery to California Packers for a total of $1,200." (Tremonton Leader, May 12, 1960)

Rose Preserving Company

1910-1912

Ogden, Weber County

April 24, 1910
Rose Preserving Company filed its articles of incorporation in Utah on April 24, 1910, with James C. Rose as president and George W. Goddard as vice president. The purpose was to take over the Utah Vinegar and Pickle Works of Ogden. (Salt Lake Herald Republican, April 24, 1910)

(see Goddard Packing company)

(Roy, Utah canneries; six separate locations)

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Roy Canning Corporation

1924 (1 plant)

Roy, Weber County

Roy Packing Company

1922 - 1929 (two plants in 1924)

Roy, Weber County

"The plant is in the very center of the finest tomato growing district of Utah, that of the sand ridge territory." (Ogden Standard Examiner, February 29, 1924)

Roy Packing Corporation

1898-1917

1921-1936

Roy, Weber County

Consolidated along with four other companies, operating seven canneries, to become Rocky Mountain Packing Corporation.

The Roy plant of Rocky Mountain Packing Corp. was still active in November 1936. (Salt Lake Telegram, November 3, 1936)

(No later reference in available online newspapers, to a Roy plant of Rocky Mountain Packing company)

Roy Stamping and Canning Company

1900 - 1901

Hooper, Davis County (very close to Roy, Weber County)

Located adjacent to the D&RG mainline just south of the Weber/Davis County line. (D&RG Val Map)

At about 6000 South, 2750 West, on a modern map.

January 12, 1900
Roy Stamping and Canning Company incorporated "today." To be located at Hooper, Davis County. (Deseret Evening News, January 12, 1900)

Organized in May 1900. (Davis County Book of Deeds P, p. 243)

March 4, 1900
Roy Stamping and Canning company being completed at a site six miles south of Ogden. (Salt Lake Tribune, March 4, 1900)

June 1, 1900
Production of cans at Roy Stamping and Canning company was to start on July 1st, with 35,000 cans to be made per day, and canning operations were to start at the end of August. (Salt Lake Tribune, June 1, 1900)

Placed into receivership in March 1901. (Salt Lake Herald, March 21, 1901)

Property sold to Utah Canning Co. in June 1901, for a reported $10,500. In business less than a year; located in Davis County; sold at sheriff's auction on courthouse steps in Farmington. New owner plans to use the stamping equipment for its own production, and to pack tomatoes. (Salt Lake Herald, June 7, 1901; Salt Lake Tribune, June 14, 1901)

June 1, 1901
Roy Stamping and Canning Company, and all of its machinery and property, was sold at Sheriff's sale, per an order of the court. (Davis County Clipper, May 31, 1901)

June 7, 1901
Sold to David Eccles (Utah Canning company) for $10,500, the amount of the judgement that caused receivership. Utah Canning announced that they would use the factory to make cans for its own use, and to can tomatoes during the upcoming season. (Salt Lake Herald, June 7, 1901; Salt Lake Tribune, June 7, 1901; June 14, 1901)

July 9, 1901
Property sold to O. D. Hadlock. Under lease until the court cleared the final sale. Hadlock organized the Star Canning Company to operate the cannery during the 1901 season. (Deseret Evening News, July 9, 1901; Salt Lake Tribune, January 1, 1902)

The factory was located adjacent to the tracks of the Rio Grande Western railway. (Salt Lake Herald, January 9, 1902)

(see also Star Canning Company)

Royal Canning Company (later Corporation)

1927 - 1961

Ogden, Weber County

June 23, 1959
"Seven Utah plants will not open this summer and other canners are expressing reluctance to schedule a normal operation because of the current marketing situation. This outlook was reported by canning firm officials today as the 1959 season started to get under way with the annual pea harvest. Plants which will not operate this year include the two large Hunt Foods plants in Tremonton and Murray, two Kaysville Canning Co. plants, Royal Canning Co. plant, the Eddington Canning Co. plant in Springville, California Packing Corp.'s Franklin, Idaho plant and the Smith Canning Co. plant in Brigham City. "The tomato and pea acreage in Utah has declined significantly during the past two years because of adverse economic conditions which have made canning operations a highly risky business," said W. C. Druebl, manager of California Packing Corp.'s Mountain States Division." (Ogden Standard Examiner, June 23, 1959)

Salt Lake Canning Company

1897 to 1934

Salt Lake Valley Canning Company

Salt Lake City (1894 - 1895)

Ogden (1895-1917) (name change)

Ogden, Utah

There was a Salt Lake Valley Canning company in Salt Lake City as early as 1894. (Davis County Clipper, September 20, 1894)

October 12, 1898
"There are three canning factories in the city [Ogden]. Two handle nothing but tomatoes. The third, the Salt Lake Valley Canning company, handles everything in the shape of fruit in addition to its tomato canning business. They are located at Five Points, and are in a splendid brick building of their own, especially fitted for the canning business. George A. Craig is president of the company, and his brother William Craig is manager. The plant is running at almost full capacity. The other factories are closing down [after the tomato business is ended] but this factory will continue to run for the next six weeks on apples, peaches, pears, plums, etc. not excluding pumpkins. The plant is of the capacity of 750 cases of tomatoes per day, of 61,000 cans, and 250 cases of fruit, in all sizes of cans, from two pounds, or one quart to one gallon cans. The company was organized four years ago [1894], and the intent and purpose was to start a plant in Salt Lake, which was done. It proved anything but successful there and the second year [1895] the whole plant was moved to Ogden and business was conducted in the old building formerly occupied by the Matson, Abbot & Barnes company. They ran the second season there, with a small supply of tomatoes and no fruit, and then they rented the old Colorado and Utah Canning factory, afterwards purchasing the site which they occupy at the present, which was not long ago a soap factory building." (Ogden Daily Standard, October 12, 1898)

May 18, 1899
George Craig sold his interest in the Salt Lake Valley Canning company to his brother William Craig, and will open a soap factory, known as the George A. Craig Soap company. (Ogden Daily Standard, May 18, 1899; Salt Lake Tribune, January 1, 1902)

January 1, 1900
"The Salt Lake Valley Canning company is also located in Ogden in a plant having a capacity of putting up 30,000 cases per year. The past season its product was 16,000 cases of tomatoes and 8000 cases of fruits. This plant started in Ogden three years ago [1897]. (Salt Lake Tribune, January 1, 1900)

March 24, 1917
By March 1917, the Salt Lake Valley Canning company was shown as being delinquent on its corporate taxes. (Salt Lake Tribune, March 24, 1917)

(see William Craig Canning company)

Scowcrofts

1930 - 1939

Ogden, Weber County

Operated as part of Scowcrofts Wholesalers, at 23rd and Wall Ave., from 1930 to 1939. (Terry-3, p. 30)

Smith Canning Company

1922 - circa 1962 [1924 (1 plant)]

Clearfield, Davis County

June 23, 1959
"Seven Utah plants will not open this summer and other canners are expressing reluctance to schedule a normal operation because of the current marketing situation. This outlook was reported by canning firm officials today as the 1959 season started to get under way with the annual pea harvest. Plants which will not operate this year include the two large Hunt Foods plants in Tremonton and Murray, two Kaysville Canning Co. plants, Royal Canning Co. plant, the Eddington Canning Co. plant in Springville, California Packing Corp.'s Franklin, Idaho plant and the Smith Canning Co. plant in Brigham City. "The tomato and pea acreage in Utah has declined significantly during the past two years because of adverse economic conditions which have made canning operations a highly risky business," said W. C. Druebl, manager of California Packing Corp.'s Mountain States Division." (Ogden Standard Examiner, June 23, 1959)

South Ogden Products

1946 - 1967

South Ogden, Davis County

Spanish Fork Canning Company

1906 - (?)

Spanish Fork, Utah County

Served by Salt Lake & Utah Railroad. (Salt Lake Telegram, July 7, 1917)

October 23, 1930
"Utah county has located within its boundaries, several large modern fruit and vegetable packing plants. At Spanish Fork the Utah Packing corporation is served by a Salt Lake & Utah railroad spur, as is the Pacific Coast Canners, Inc., plant at Provo, and the Pleasant Grove Canning company at Orem. The Springville Canning company, Springville, Utah, also served by the same road, just completed this summer a large addition to their warehouse." (Springville Herald, October 23, 1930)

Springville Canning Company

1910, 1911, 1919, 1924 (1 plant)

Springville, Utah County, Utah

Served by Salt Lake & Utah Railroad. (Salt Lake Telegram, July 7, 1917)

September 21, 1912
Mrs. Caroline B. Seymour of New York became manager of the Springville Canning company to supervise its production using her methods found to be successful in the East. She had also made arrangements with the Garden City Canning company in provo for that company to furnish several carloads of Utah peaches for the eastern markets. (Salt Lake Telegram, September 21, 1912)

October 23, 1930
"Utah county has located within its boundaries, several large modern fruit and vegetable packing plants. At Spanish Fork the Utah Packing corporation is served by a Salt Lake & Utah railroad spur, as is the Pacific Coast Canners, Inc., plant at Provo, and the Pleasant Grove Canning company at Orem. The Springville Canning company, Springville, Utah, also served by the same road, just completed this summer a large addition to their warehouse." (Springville Herald, October 23, 1930)

Star Canning Company

1902 - 1917

Roy, Weber County

The factory was located adjacent to the tracks of the Rio Grande Western railway. (Salt Lake Herald, January 9, 1902)

"Before the beginning of the First World War the Star Canning company was started in Roy and was located about one mile south of 6000 south and on the west side of the Union Pacific tracks. Ere long this factory also came into the hands of Jake Parker." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

March 20, 1922
By March 1922, the Star Canning company was shown as being delinquent on its corporate taxes. (Ogden Standard Examiner, March 20, 1922)

Stevens Canning Company

(1943 to ???), 1961

Roy, Weber County

Storey Foods Products

1938 - 1952

Ogden, Weber County

Sunshine Canning Company

1944

Ogden, Weber County

Superior Canning Company

1926 - 1929

Ogden, Weber County

Located at 3180 Pacific Ave. (Terry-3, p. 29)

Syracuse Canning Company

1893 - 1918

Syracuse, Davis County

Twin Peaks Canning Company

1919 (2 plants), 1924 (2 plants)

Murray, Salt Lake County

Brand names were: "Sunny Utah" and "Twin Peaks".

Canned only vegetables. Was not subject to a May 1920 curtailment of the use of sugar for canning fruit. (The Sun [Price, Utah], May 28, 1920)

First canning company in Murray. Started by Uriah George Miller (1874-1958). (Salt Lake Tribune, June 23, 1958; Miller obituary)

Consolidated along with four other companies, operating seven canneries, to become Rocky Mountain Packing Corporation.

Uintah Canning Company

(1906 to 1913), 1919, 1924

Uintah, Utah

Utah Canning Company (first)

Ogden, Weber County

1887-1890 (pioneer Lundy cannery, unincorporated)

In its first season, in 1887, the canning factory operated under the name of "Lundy & McKinney," and was located "at the foot of 9th Street, Ogden." (Ogden Standard, August 7, 1887, "Sell Your Tomatoes")

The canning factory was also known as the "Ogden Cannery works." (Ogden Standard, August 20, 1887)

September 4, 1887
"Not the least important of these establishments is the canning factory which was started at the old vinegar works a few weeks ago by Messrs. Lundy & McKinney. The works are admirably adopted for thois class of work. They are close by the railroad track and are run by steam." (Ogden Standard, September 4, 1887)

(For the 1888 season, Lundy remained at the Pacific Avenue and 29th Street location; McKinney moved about a mile north and started the Ogden Canning Company.)

November 2, 1888
"Canning Season Closed -- The Lundy & Kershaw cannery closed last week after a successful run during the past season. About 10,000 cases of fruit have been put up and a great portion of it disposed of at home to wholesale houses. It is estimated that the business to be done by the canneries next season will be trebled and extensions are accordingly to be made. Messrs. Lundy & Kershaw propose to greatly increase their capacity and room. The present building of 24 feet by 100 feet deep will be enlarged, so as to make a front of 75 feet. More machinery will likely be put in and other improvements made." (Ogden Standard, November 2, 1888)

1888
According to H. L. Herrington, who became president of the Utah Canning in 1918, the company had the following results in the first year of operations, 1888, "The first cases of goods packed were approximately 4,000 cases of tomatoes which were grown on thirty-five acres." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

September 29, 1889
"Utah Canning Factory -- This Cannery, under the management of R. C. Lundy, is also doing a brisk business in their line." (Salt Lake Herald, September 29, 1889)

1890-1892

June 18, 1890
Utah Canning Company (first) was incorporated on June 17, 1890. R. C. Lundy was president and I. N. Pierce was vice president. A. J. Kershaw was the treasurer. (Salt Lake Herald, June 18, 1890)

April 16, 1892
Name changed to Colorado & Utah Canning Company on April 15, 1892, by vote of shareholders. (Ogden Standard, April 16, 1892)

July 19, 1891
Utah Canning company. "Situated just west of the Union Pacific railroad tracks, between Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth it is a durably and attractively built brick structure, 160x160 feet in extent and two stories in height. The distilling department is located on the second floor and is an apartment 20x40 feet, in which the mash tubs with a capacity of 5,000 barrels of vinegar per year. Here the wheat and barley is converted into sugar and alcohol and passes into fermenting tubs below, where it is separated by a patent process and the acetic acid or vinegar produced. The generating room is 30x20 feet and the product at present is about 50 barrels of vinegar per week. The canning department consists of two floors, each 120x80 feet, and fitted up in the most complete manner. When operations are commenced in full, which will be in about a month, they expect to receive and convert about 30 tons of tomatoes alone daily. Sauerkraut will be made this season to the extent of 200 tons. The factory as it is now equipped will turn out about 30,000 cases of caned goods this season in addition to 3000 barrels of vinegar and 3060 barrels of pickles." (Ogden Standard, July 19, 1891)

November 7, 1891
(First mention of a tin stamping factory in Ogden) A Mr. Woodbury of Denver was proposing a tin stamp mill to be located in Ogden. The Chamber of Commerce was unenthusiastic on the subject due to the lack of details. But Robert Lundy was a director of the Chamber and stated that if such a business was not put in at Ogden, he himself would likely do it. A tin stamping mill would likely be located somewhere in the vicinity of the Utah Canning factory, which would consume "something like a million cans the coming season." (Ogden Standard, November 7, 1891)

During February and March 1892, R. C. Lundy made several trips to Colorado to establish locations for canning factories, and to arrange growers contracts.

Colorado & Utah Canning Company

1892-1897

April 15, 1892
Utah Canning company was reorganized on April 15, 1892, as the Colorado-Utah Canning company, increasing the board of directors from five to seven, and increasing the shares of stock. A new canning factory, larger than the one in Ogden, was being built at Littleton, Colorado. (Ogden Standard, April 16, 1892)

"Colorado-Utah Canning Company" was organized in April 1892. Colorado interests were represented on the board of directors by W. A. Cooper and Avery Gallop, both of Denver. (Salt Lake Herald, April 10, 1892)

(August 1892; A. J. Woodbury of Denver had moved to Ogden to build and manage a tin-stamping factory. The machinery had arrived and was being set up temporarily in wood planing mill. -- Salt Lake Herald, August 23, 1892)

August 11, 1893
Colorado & Utah Canning company was in receivership on August 11, 1893 due to a shareholder suing the company concerning contracts made with farmers in Colorado, to furnish the plant in Colorado with products. (Ogden Standard, August 12, 1893)

During 1893 to 1895, Colorado & Utah Canning company was under the control of at least three different receivers due to separate court cases for claims of default against the company.

April 25, 1894
Colorado & Utah Canning company opened a factory in Salt Lake City "working up pickles and kindred products." (Salt Lake Herald, April 25, 1894)

July 27, 1895
All assets of the Colorado & Utah Canning Co. were sold to W. S. Benton for reported $60,000. W. S. Benton had been a plaintiff in an April 1895 suit against the canning company. (Salt Lake Tribune, July 27, 1895)

Utah Canning Company (second)

1897-1960

January 28, 1897
Utah Canning Company (second) was incorporated in Utah on January 28, 1897. (Deseret Evening News, January 28, 1897)

Financed by David Eccles and his First National Bank of Ogden.

November 9, 1901
Planned in December 1901 to make its own cans, using machinery to be installed in a new building. The new addition had two stories and a basement. (Ogden Standard, July 17, 1901; November 9, 1901)

March 4, 1902
Work began in March 1902 on a two-story addition, 55 feet by 105 feet; top floor to be used for storage of cans, lower floor to be used as warehouse space for canned products. (Ogden Standard, March 4, 1902)

By 1904 Utah Canning was one of the largest of seventeen canneries in the state.

Fenruary 26, 1907
In February 1907, added more space to the factory, 27 feet by 54 feet. (Salt Lake Herald, February 26, 1907)

September 1909
First referece in available online newspapers for "Pierce's Pork and Beans." (Ogden Standard, September 8, 1909)

April 19, 1913
By April 1913, Utah Canning Co. had 50,000 square feet of factory and warehouse space, being one of the largest in the state. (Ogden Standard, April 19, 1913)

1918
In 1918 it was reported that the Utah Canning company had the largest individual factory in the state and the largest output of any one cannery in Utah. It was also reported that it was the only cannery that operated year-round. The beans used in its pork and beans product were imported until just recently, when local growers began furnishing the needed smaller-sized beans. (Ogden Standard, February 8, 1918)

June 16, 1960
Utah Canning company and Pleasant Grove Canning company merged to form Utah Packers, Inc. The merger included the three plants of the Pleasant Grove company (Pleasant Grove, Orem and Provo), and the Ogden plant of the Utah Canning company. (Lehi Free Press, June 16, 1960)

The new merged company was called Utah Packers, Inc. (Salt Lake Tribune, June 10, 1960)

The merger was approved by the shareholders of both companies on July 14, 1960. (Salt Lake Tribune, July 15, 1960)

After the Ogden cannery closed after the 1964 season, the building was sold to Utah By-Products in early 1965. The most obvious change after the sale was the removal of the large warehouse that had "Utah Canning Co." painted in large letters along the top of the building, on its east face.

The Utah Canning Co. plant at 29th Street and the railroad tracks was built in 1898, with several later additions. It remained in operation after a merger with Pleasant Grove Canning Co., in 1960 when it became Utah Packers, Inc. Many recall the large building with "Utah Canning Co." lettering.

The canning building at 2915 Pacific Avenue in Ogden was sold to Utah By-Products, which in May 1965 received a building permit for $76,000 in changes and improvements. The Utah Canning building was torn down in 1966 after Utah By-Products company bought the plant. They remained on that site until 1977 when Ogden City forced them out of town due to numerous complaints to the city council about obnoxious odors and the facility being a public nuisance.

Clearfield, Davis County (1925 - (?))

Utah Fish Canning Company

(see also Geneva Canning Co.)

1918, 1923-1937

(near RGW Geneva [Battle Creek] siding, just north of the modern-day Lindon boat harbor, on the northeast shore of Utah Lake)

Utah Fruit Juice Company

1919, 1924

(location unknown)

Utah Packing Corporation (Del Monte)

1919 (5 plants), 1924 (5 plants), 1934 (5 plants), 1936 (7 plants), 1961 (6 plants)

Labels were "Del Monte" and "Sunkist".

Organized in 1918 as subsidiary of California Packing Company.

Bought all five of Jake Parker's operations in 1918.

(Read more about William J. "Jake" Parker)

West Ogden plant of Del Monte:

The site was first occupied in 1900 by Adams Nursery and Tin Can Manufacturers, which was reorganized in 1903 as Wasatch Gardens and Orchard Canning Company. The Adams company built the brick building that still stands at the original location. They installed can manufacturing equipment and later installed equipment for the canning of vegetables and fruits, being the first factory for the canning of fruits in the state of Utah.

The plant was purchased in 1914 by Jake Parker, and became the center of operations that included the five largest canneries in the state. In 1918 he sold all five plants to the Utah Packing Company, which was a subsidiary of the California Packing Company. After selling his canning interests in Utah to Utah Packing, Parker remained in the food canning business, and in 1933 built the American Provision plant that later became the Swift meat packing plant just north of the 24th Street viaduct.

The Starr Canning Company property, located at about 2300 North west of the UP tracks in Roy, was sold to the Utah Packing Company in March 1917.

The property in South Weber was sold to the Utah Packing Company by the Morgan Canning Company in January 1918, which purchased it in March 1917. (Davis County Grantee's Index, Book 2, and Book of Deeds C, p. 222)

Utah Packing Company bought the cannery in Spanish Fork in June 1925. (Spanish Fork, p. 111)

"While the principal industry of Spanish Fork has always been agriculture, the city has also become a primary livestock center. The canning industry was also important; in 1925, the Utah Packing Corporation established a factory and began to contract with local farmers for the growing of peas, beans, and tomatoes." (Elisha Warner, The History of Spanish Fork, 1930)

In spring 1928 bought the two canneries of the Morgan Canning Company, in Morgan and in Smithfield, along with that same company's green bean cannery in Hyrum.

In February 1935 the Utah Packing Company sold the property containing the former Starr Canning Company, along with property in South Weber, to the California Packing Company. (Davis County Book of Abstracts 5, p. 197, and Book of Deeds 1-N, p. 7)

Reorganized in 1936 as the Mountain States Division of California Packing Corporation. (Terry-3, p. 20)

June 23, 1959
"Seven Utah plants will not open this summer and other canners are expressing reluctance to schedule a normal operation because of the current marketing situation. This outlook was reported by canning firm officials today as the 1959 season started to get under way with the annual pea harvest. Plants which will not operate this year include the two large Hunt Foods plants in Tremonton and Murray, two Kaysville Canning Co. plants, Royal Canning Co. plant, the Eddington Canning Co. plant in Springville, California Packing Corp.'s Franklin, Idaho plant and the Smith Canning Co. plant in Brigham City. "The tomato and pea acreage in Utah has declined significantly during the past two years because of adverse economic conditions which have made canning operations a highly risky business," said W. C. Druebl, manager of California Packing Corp.'s Mountain States Division." (Ogden Standard Examiner, June 23, 1959)

June 27, 1967
Shareholders approved changing the name of the company from California Packing Corporation to Del Monte Corporation. (New York Times, June 28, 1967, "yesterday")

Ceased Utah operations in 1968. (Terry-3, p. 21)

Utah Packers, Incorporated

1960-1972 (4 plants; 3 plants after 1965; 2 plants after 1966)

(see Pleasant Grove Canning company)

June 16, 1960
Utah Canning company and Pleasant Grove Canning company merged to form Utah Packers, Inc. The merger included the three plants of the Pleasant Grove company (Pleasant Grove, Orem and Provo), and the Ogden plant of the Utah Canning company. (Lehi Free Press, June 16, 1960)

June 16, 1960
Utah Canning company and Pleasant Grove Canning company merged to form Utah Packers, Inc. The merger included the three plants of the Pleasant Grove company (Pleasant Grove, Orem and Provo), and the Ogden plant of the Utah Canning company. (Lehi Free Press, June 16, 1960)

The new merged company was called Utah Packers, Inc. (Salt Lake Tribune, June 10, 1960)

The merger was approved by the shareholders of both companies on July 14, 1960. (Salt Lake Tribune, July 15, 1960)

March 29, 1963
Utah Packers announced that its Pleasant Grove plant would be idle for the 1963 season. It was the smallest of the companies canning plants, and was only used to process and pack chili sauce, which the company had sufficient supply of. In previous seasons, the Pleasant Grove plant had been used to pack beans, which had been moved to its Ogden plant. The Provo plant was used to freeze peas and corn, and the Orem plant was used to pack tomatoes and cherries. (Ogden Standard Examiner, March 29, 1963)

After the Ogden cannery closed after the 1964 season, the building was sold to Utah By-Products in early 1965. The most obvious change after the sale was the removal of the large warehouse that had "Utah Canning Co." painted in large letters along the top of the building, on its east face.

The Utah Canning Co. plant at 29th Street and the railroad tracks was built in 1898, with several later additions. It remained in operation after a merger with Pleasant Grove Canning Co., in 1960 when it became Utah Packers, Inc. Many recall the large building with "Utah Canning Co." lettering.

The canning building at 2915 Pacific Avenue in Ogden was sold to Utah By-Products, which in May 1965 received a building permit for $76,000 in changes and improvements. The Utah Canning building was torn down in 1966 after Utah By-Products company bought the plant. They remained on that site until 1977 when Ogden City forced them out of town due to numerous complaints to the city council about obnoxious odors and the facility being a public nuisance.

August 3, 1967
The Pleasant Grove plant of the Pleasant Grove Canning company was sold in August 1967. The Pleasant Grove plant had been closed since June 30, 1966 when a boiler explosion stopped the pea canning production in the middle of the season. After the explosion, the building had only been used for warehouse storage. (Provo Daily Herald, July 1, 1966; Pleasant Grove Review, August 3, 1967)

(Although not mentioned in local newspapers, the 1971 packing season was apparently the last for both of Utah Packers' remaining plants, in Provo and in Orem. The Ogden plant had been closed since early 1965. The Pleasant Grove plant had been closed since an explosion and fire in June 1966.)

May 16-17, 1972
The Provo plant of Utah Packers, and all its contents were sold at auction on May 16th. The Orem plant and all its contents were sold at auction on May 17th. (Orem Geneva Times, May 11, 1972)

Utah Products Company

1910, 1911

Murray, Salt Lake County

Van Alen Canning Company

1919 (2 plants), 1924 (2 plants), 1934 (2 plants)

Ogden, Weber County, Utah [1918, name change - 1926 (Terry-3, p. 21)]

At the same location, at 21st Street and Reeves Ave., there was Ogden Canning (1902-1904), then Banner Canning (1904-1918), then Van Alen Canning (1918-1928), then Rocky Mountain Packing (1928 to end of 1938 season). (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

Tremonton, Box Elder County, Utah

Consolidated along with four other companies, operating seven canneries, to become Rocky Mountain Packing Corporation.

Varney Canning Company

1931 - 1942

Roy, Weber County

Vel-Donna Canning Company

(years unknown)

Ogden, Weber County

Organized by Oscar Jones in the early 1940's.Located at 820 West 25th Street, renamed in 1950 to Vel-Donna Canning Company, closed in 1951

W. R. Eddington Canning Company

1936

(location unknown)

Wasatch Gardens and Orchard Canning Company

1903 - 1914

Ogden, Weber County

December 24, 1909
Jake Parker, manager of Star Canning, took a 10-year lease on the "Wasatch Canning factory," to take effect on January 1, 1910. (Ogden Standard, December 24, 1909)

Wasatch Orchard Company

(see Wasatch Gardens and Orchard Canning Company)

Weber County Canning Company

1919

(location unknown)

Weber Canning Company

(years unknown)

(location unknown)

Weber Packing Corporation

1924 - 1932, 1936

Ogden, Weber County

"In 1912 Joseph Wright and Horace Wittier had built a cannery on the east side of Roy on the main highway from Ogden to Salt Lake City, which is now Utah State highway 126. They operated this plant for two years at that location after which time (in 1914) they constructed a plant at 33rd and Pacific Ave. in Ogden where they continued in the canning business until 1923. The building left vacant by the Wright-Wittier Canning Company at 33rd and Pacific was vacant for one year at which time it was re-occupied by the Weber Packing Corporation (1924), with Fred M. Nye as president. After eight seasons it too closed its doors." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

West Point Canning Company

1925 - 1936

West Point, Davis County

West Weber Canning Company

1912 - ?

West Weber, Weber County

Western Food Products

1924 (1 plant)

(location unknown)

William Craig Canning Company

(sometimes referred to as William Craig and Son Company, or just William Craig Company)

(Read more about William Craig)

1917 - 1934 (3 plants)

Salt Lake Valley Canning Co. (1897-1917)

William Craig Canning Co. (1917- 1934) (opened factory in Roy, 1917-1930)

The following comes from William Terry's "The Canning Industry In Weber County," 1983:

In the Ogden City directory, 1897, we find that a cannery by the name of the Salt Lake Valley Canning Company had been built at 360 Walnut Street (between 3rd and 4th streets). This location was a convenient spot close to a source of cans as well as a fairly large number of small farms in the area. In the same directory William Craig is mentioned as living at 364 Walnut and as president of a canning company.

In a small publication called, "The Junction City" (no date given but we suspect that it was published circa 1912), we find articles praising the merits of different types of businesses in Ogden. Concerning the Salt Lake Valley Canning we read:

"Wm.W. Craig, president and manager - No locality in the intermountain states equals the Great Salt Lake Valley Canning Company in the production and canning of choice fruits and vegetables. And this plant established by Wm.W. Craig is one of the earliest and one of the best established canneries … When you have seen the system and neatness with which the produce from the long train of farm wagons is received, prepared and packed, you will always ask for the "pure foods" from the Salt Lake Valley Canning Company."

The name of the company was changed to the Craig Canning Company in 1917 and was listed on Hudson Ave. (now Kiesel) near 3rd street. This same year Craig opened a branch factory in Roy, undoubtedly influenced by the great demand for canned foods during World War I.

The Roy branch operated until after the 1930 canning season, the Five Points plant closed at the end of the 1934 campaign.

In 1921 all of the officers of the company were members of the Craig family. In 1922 Henry D. Olson became vice president and treasurer. In 1924 George W. Goddard became president with H. D. Olson as vice president and Wm. Varney as treasurer. H. Dobson was listed in the Ogden directory as principal owner and general manager in 1930. In 1933 J. Ellis became the manager. In 1934 the Craig Canning Company closed its doors.

William H. Craig died on June 14, 1921. The administrator of his estate, A. P. Bigelow, sold the Craig interests in the Craig Canning company to George W. Goddard, H. D. Olson, and William Varney. This sale was contested March 1932 by Goddard in the interest of the estate's heirs and beneficiaries. (Ogden Standard Examiner, March 7, 1932)

Roy factory closed at end of 1930 season; re-opened in 1941 by Robins Canning Company.

Willard Canning Company

1902 - 1922 [1919 (2 plants), 1924 (1 plant)]

Willard, Box Elder County

In 1907, Willard Canning company was one of three canneries in Box Elder County: Brigham City Canning company; Willard Canning company; and Rocky Mountain Canning company. (Salt Lake Tribune, September 3, 1907)

Woods Cross Canning and Pickling Company

1892 - 1912

Woods Cross, Davis County

(RESEARCH: Check Davis County: Nov 1899, Deeds P, p. 168, SW24, 2N, 1W)

Woods Cross Canning Company

1912-1961

1919 (4 plants)

1924 (4 plants)

1936 (4 plants)

Woods Cross, Davis County; property now part of West Bountiful; closed in about 1947, property sold to adjacent (south) Phillips Petroleum in September 1951.

Layton, Davis County; canning operations slowly moved to more modern Clearfield plant, Layton site used as warehouse; closed and property sold in May 1949, buildings demolished, except brick warehouse

Clearfield, Davis County

Organized in January 1912 as a consolidation of the Woods Cross Canning and Pickling Company, the Clearfield Canning Company, and the Layton Canning Company. (Davis County Book of Deeds A, p. 9; Book of Deeds D, p. 332; Book of Deeds E, pp. 55, 68, 94)

(RESEARCH
Davis County, Aug 1927, Abstracts 4, p. 30, Deeds 1-H, p. 451, SE20, 4N, 1W
Davis County, May 1928, Abstracts 4, p. 74, Deeds 1-E, p. 36, NW1, 4N, 2W
Davis County, Sept 1935, Abstracts 4, p. 32, Deeds 1-N, p. 90, SE20, SW21, 4N, 1W )

Wright-Whittier Canning Company

Roy, Weber County (1912 - 1914)

Ogden, Weber County (1914 - 1923)

"In 1912 Joseph Wright and Horace Wittier had built a cannery on the east side of Roy on the main highway from Ogden to Salt Lake City, which is now Utah State highway 126. They operated this plant for two years at that location after which time (in 1914) they constructed a plant at 33rd and Pacific Ave. in Ogden where they continued in the canning business until 1923. When the Wright-Wittier company moved to Ogden (in 1914) it left the Roy building vacant for a few years. When the combination of the two Jones brothers was dissolved (in 1920) Oscar Jones moved his operations to the abandoned (Wright-Wittier) building on the highway. Oscar Jones called his cannery at this location the Hillcrest Canning Company. (Hillcrest operated until the end of the 1928 season.)" (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

"The building left vacant by the Wright-Wittier Canning Company at 33rd and Pacific was vacant for one year at which time it was re-occupied by the Weber Packing Corporation (1924), with Fred M. Nye as president. After eight seasons it too closed its doors." (William Terry, The Canning Industry In Weber County, 1983)

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