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Rio Grande Western Railway (1889-1908)

Standard Gauge Locomotives

By George E. Pitchard

This page was last updated on August 27, 2004.

(Return to George Pitchard Archive index page)

Introduction

Starting in 1889, and running through 1907, the Rio Grande Western had on its roster 127 standard-gauge locomotives (not including the 'set-out' former narrow-gauge engines; all of these 127 engines were purchased new for the R.G.W., none being acquired second-hand. Most survived to become D.& R.G. engines when the R.G.W. was merged, officially and properly, into the D.& R.G. on July 31, 1908; several of the heaviest 2-8-0 engines survived into the last days of D.& R.G.W. standard-gauge steam operations in late 1956.

This roster-story is not so lengthy/exhaustive as the narrow-gauge one was; we believe, however, that it conveys useful information not readily available, or to be had by 'backing-out' the R.G.W. engines from any existing, published, D.& R.G.(W.) roster.

The arrangement is by class, more or less chronologically, according to when the first engines of the class were received. Information available to the compiler hereof dictates a somewhat-higher level of detail for the Baldwin engines than the others. Cost figures, where given, are from a D.& R.G.(W.) card-file record of "Locomotives Retired," and therefore should represent the 'book value' of the loco when vacated, an amount which should include sundry 'additions and betterments' over the years; the figures are included here mostly as a curiosity. Most of the 'Disposition' data given here are from that same "Locomotives Retired" record.

Baldwin 2-8-0, 111-153, 1889-1892
RGW
Number:
10/34E- c/n, & date: Cost: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
111 -964 10270, 9/89   630 8/28/09 600 scrapped 10/31/1929
112 -965 10272, 9/89 9,553.88 631 1/08/09 601 retired 10/26, scrapped 12/26
113 -966 10273, 9/89 9,530.24 632 12/24/08 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
114 -967 10278, 9/89 9,522.12 633 1/31/09 - scrapped 3/31/17 at Salt Lake City
115 -968 10279, 9/89   634 4/28/09 604 scrapped 10/26/1929
116 -969 10280, 9/89   635 7/24/09 605 sold 7/51 Victor-American Fuel Co.
117 -970 10284, 9/89   636 4/30/09 606 scrapped 11/1934
118 -971 10285, 9/89   637 6/25/09 607 scrapped 12/1934
119 -972 10286, 9/89 9,463.48 638 4/30/09 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
120 -973 10289, 9/89 9,462.70 639 4/01/09 625 scrapped 8/24 at Salt Lake City
121 -974 10294, 9/89 9,463.35 640 2/26/09 610 retired 10/26, scrapped 12/26
122 -975 10384, 10/89   641 6/23/10 611 scrapped 10/31/1929
123 -976 10385, 10/89 9,522.36 642 12/21/08 612 retired 12/24, scrapped 8/25 at Salt Lake City
124 -977 10386, 10/89 9,458.06 643 10/31/10 - scrapped 3/31/17 at Salt Lake City
125 -978 10387, 10/89 9,459.06 644 2/18/09 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
126 -979 10388, 10/89 9,459.56 645 6/28/09 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
127 -980 10390, 10/89 9,459.06 646 8/18/09 613 retired 10/26, scrapped 12/26
128 -981 10391, 10/89 9,459.72 647 6/30/10 603 sold 1/28 List Const. Co., $3,500.00
129 -982 10392, 10/89 9,459.56 648 12/09/08 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
130 -983 10393, 10/89 9,460.56 649 2/18/09 609 retired 10/25, scrapped 3/26 at Salt Lake City
131 -1013 10468, 11/89   650 3/24/09 608 scrapped 11/1934
132 -1014 10471, 11/89 9,821.58 651 6/28/09 - scrapped 1/31/1916 at Salt Lake City
133 -1015 10475, 11/89 9,774.13 652 12/09/08 602 scrapped 12/1928
134 -1016 10476, 11/89 9,773.93 653 2/18/09 - scrapped 3/31/1917 at Salt Lake City
135 -1017 10479, 11/89   654 2/26/09 614 scrapped 12/1934
136 -1230 11585, 2/91   655 4/01/09 615 retired 10/29, scrapped 10/26/29
137 -1231 11584, 2/91 10,178.44 656 8/06/09 616 retired 10/26, scrapped 12/26
138 -1234 11591, 2/91 10,206.94 657 7/07/09 617 scrapped 12/1928
139 -1235 11592, 2/91   658 6/05/09 618 scrapped 12/1934
140 -1236 11668, 3/91 10,196.86 659 6/10/10 619 retired 10/26, scrapped 12/26
141 -1237 11669, 3/91   660 6/19/09 620 retired 12/29, scrapped 12/28/29
142 -1238 11771, 4/91 10,189.72 661 1/31/09 - sold 12/31/1916 to Indian Valley RR No. 1, $4,500.00
143 -1239 11777, 4/91 10,189.72 662 7/27/09 626 scrapped 8/24 at Salt Lake City
144 -1255 12025, 7/91 10,236.13 663 4/30/09 623 scrapped 8/24 at Salt Lake City
145 -1256 12026, 7/91 10,236.13 664 4/01/09 624 scrapped 8/24 at Salt Lake City
146 -1263 12036, 7/91 10,236.13 665 8/18/09 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
147 -1264 12033, 7/91 10,236.13 666 9/10/09 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
148 -1265 12034, 7/91 10,236.13 667 3/30/09 - scrapped 2/3/1916 at Salt Lake City
149 -1266 12417, 1/92 10,189.02 668 6/30/10 - sold 12/31/1916 to Indian Valley RR No. 2, $4,500.00
150 -1267 12421, 1/92 10,189.02 669 2/10/09 - scrapped 2/24/1915 at Salt Lake City
151 -1268 12423, 1/92   670 2/12/09 621 retired 12/24, scrapped 8/25 at Salt Lake City
152 -1269 12431, 1/92   671 11/26/09 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
153 -1270 12426, 1/92   672 12/28/10 622 retired 12/24, scrapped 8/25 at Salt Lake City

Probably the first standard-gauge engines ordered, about June 29, 1889, these were the first standard-gauge engines to begin arriving, as on October 4, 1889, the first four, numbers 111-114, arrived at Ogden, and on October 10, 1889 were brought to Salt Lake City behind Southern Pacific engine 248. The first 'revenue' use of one of these engines seems to have been on October 13, 1889, when the No. 111 took a freight train from Salt Lake City to Ogden. The initial lot was 20 locomotives; smaller lots were added over the next couple of years, with the last lot of five locomotives coming along in February 1892, bringing to 43 the total number of these Baldwin class 10/34E 2-8-0 engines on the R.G.W., easily the largest single class on the road. As built, these engines had 20x24" cylinders, 46" drivers, and an engine weight of 'about' 113,000 lbs., per the Baldwin spec sheet for these engines, which was dated June 29, 1889. Initially painted black, no striping, with letters and numbers in lemon yellow, having "RIO GRANDE WESTERN" on tank collar, a 'large' number on tank sides, but no number on back of tank, number on sand box and on front number plate; Westinghouse air brake; and tender to hold 3,450 gallons of water.

Assigned class 113 at the beginning, somewhere between September 1, 1890 and March 1, 1891 it is changed to class 133-1/2; the rosters show engine weight as being 133,600 lbs, cylinders and drivers as noted above. But, then, between November 1, 1891 and January 1, 1892, the engine weight in the rosters goes back to 113,000 lbs., and in January of 1892, these engines again are assigned to Class 113.

Experience evidently showed that 46-inch drivers were not quite large enough for a standard-gauge, as in early 1894 began a program of rebuilding these engines with 50-inch drivers; cylinders remain at 20x24-inch, but engine weight increases somewhat, to 118,500 pounds. No. 117 was the first engine so remodeled, it being the only engine shown as rebuilt in the July 1, 1894 roster; over the next several years (by January 1, 1900), all but three engines, Nos. 116, 147 and 149, get the facelift. The roster at January 1, 1900 shows the 40 engines rebuilt to have an engine weight of 120,100 lbs., with some slight variation in the number of flues in various of the engines in this class, and with considerable variety shown in tenders on these engines.

Class 113 had been changed to class 119 for the rebuilds in late 1894, but in 1895 both classes 113 and 119 became class 20, in the RGW's new method of classifying by cylinder diameter, rather than by engine weight. In its turn, class 20 became class 120 when the D&RG took over in 1901, and the RGW engines were again classified in a system largely based on engine weight.

With the finalization of D&RG ownership of the RGW, and the absorption of the RGW by the D&RG in 1908, renumbering of most RGW equipment was decided upon, and carried out over the next couple of years; these 43 engines, RGW 111-153, were renumbered to D&RG 630-672, the actual renumbering commencing in December of 1908 and not being completed until the end of December, 1910. Twenty-seven of the 43 engines survived to be renumbered 600-626 in the general renumbering of 1924, and were assigned class C-26.

Of the 27 engines that made it to the 1924 renumbering, 21 were scrapped (or sold, in one case) in the 1920s; the six remaining after 1929, numbers 605, 606, 607, 608, 614 and 618, were all save one scrapped in 1934; the lone survivor, No. 605, was sold in July of 1951, to the Victor-American Fuel Co. As a class, then, these engines lasted just a bit under 62 years.

See: Salt Lake Tribune, October 5, 11, 13, 15, 17, 18, 20, 1889; January 7, 1890; March 29, 1891; April 7, 12, 1891; August 16, 1891; February 14, 1892; October 26, 1894; December 1, 1894.

Rome (New York Loco Wks) 4-6-0, numbers 33-42 and 51-54, 1889-1891
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: Cost: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
33 536, 9/89 9,443.04 540 12/11/08 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Grand Junction
34 537, 9/89 9,405.83 541 12/05/09 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
35 538, 10/89 9,404.84 542 1/08/09 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
36 539, 10/89 9,410.60 543 4/30/09 - sold 11/18/1916 to Deep Creek RR No. 1, $4,500.00; scrapped 9/1930
37 540, 10/89 9,357.51 544 6/19/09 - scrapped 2/1924 at Salt Lake City
38 541, 10/89 9,356.00 545, 2/04/09 500 scrapped 3/1926 at Grand Junction
39 672, 2/91 9,452.57 546 8/06/09 - sold 8/11/1917 to Western Pacific RR No. 126, $4,000.00
40 673, 2/91 9,452.57 547 4/16/09 - scrapped 2/11/1916 at Salt Lake City
41 674, 2/91 9,461.17 548 12/23/08 501 scrapped 3/1926 at Grand Junction
42 675, 2/91 9,461.17 549 2/12/09 - sold 8/11/1917 to Western Pacific RR No. 127, $4,000.00
51 568, 3/90 8,923.55 503 5/05/09 - scrapped 1/14/1916 at Burnham shops
52 569, 3/90 8,989.23 504 -/-/09 - scrapped 2/3/1916 at Salt Lake City
53 570, 3/90 9,006.19 505 -/-/09 - scrapped 12/22/15 at Salt Lake City
54 571, 3/90 8,947.56 506 12/12/08 - scrapped 1/10/1916 at Burnham shops

The second lot of standard gauge engines to be received, the first two of which, numbers 33 and 34, arrived in Salt Lake City on November 3, 1889; No. 33 was the first to run, being run to Ogden and back on a trial trip on Monday, November 4, 1889.

Four additional engines made up the whole of the initial lot of six engines, the last of which, numbers 37 and 38, had been received by mid-November of 1889.

Early in 1890, four additional Rome 4-6-0 engines were received, numbers 51 through 54; these were slightly lighter/smaller than the 33-38, and a trifle cheaper, too. Finally, in February of 1891, a final lot of four Rome 4-6-0 engines was received, of the same class as Nos. 33-38, though the first two arrived numbered 55 and 56; they were quickly renumbered 39 and 40.

The earliest available roster, dated September 1, 1890, shows the 33-42 as having 18x24" cylinders, 54" drivers, and an engine weight of 129,500 lbs., and assigned class 107; by March 1, 1891, the class was changed to 129, and in November-December 1891, the engine weight is revised downwards, to 107,000 lbs., and so in January, 1892, these engines are reassigned class 107!

In August, 1892, No. 40 is the first of this class to be rebuilt, the 54-inch drivers being replaced with 60-inch, and the engine weight being bumped up to 113,000 lbs., and a change in class, for the rebuilds, to class 113. At July 1, 1894, only the 37 remains as delivered, out of the 33-42 series, and by February 1, 1895 it, too, has been rebuilt, shortly after which all ten become class 18, in the RGW's new way of doing things. In 1897 the engine weight is again revised, to 114,800 lbs. At the D&RG takeover, these engines become class 115; in 1908 scheme, renumbered to 540-549; only two make it to the 1924 renumbering, becoming class T-17 engines numbers 500 and 501 - which two are scrapped in March, 1926.

As to the 51-54, these four initially show as class 962, having 17x24" cylinders, 54" drivers, and an engine weight of 124,400 lbs. The same story as with the other Rome 4-6-0 engines, and the Baldwin 2-8-0s, applies here, too - by March 1, 1891, the class is changed to 124; in November-December 1891, the engine weight is revised downwards, to 96,500 lbs., and in January of 1892, they become class 96. In October of 1892, No. 52 becomes the first of this group to be rebuilt with 60-inch drivers, and a slight boost in engine weight to 102,500 lbs, with the consequent change in class to 102. By May 1, 1895, all four, 51-54, have been rebuilt, and class changed to 17, in the cylinder-diameter system. The 1897 revision of engine weights puts these engines at 104,200 lbs. At D&RG takeover, these four become class 104, in 1908 renumbered to D&RG numbers 503-506; none survived to the 1924 renumbering, all having been scrapped in the December 1915 to February 1916 period.

See: Salt Lake Tribune, November 5, 7, 14, 1889; January 7, 1890; February 12, 15, 1891; March 2, 1891; September 2, 1892; October 15, 1892.

Baldwin 4-6-0, 61-66, 1892
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: Cost: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
61 12578, 5/92 10,149.96 550 2/26/09 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
62 12596, 5/92 10,149.96 551 12/09/08 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
63 12601, 5/92 10,748.94 712 5/13/09 521 scrapped 8/24 at Salt Lake City
64 12946, 10/92 10,881.77 713 12/24/08 520 retired 8/24, scrapped 8/24 at Salt Lake City
65 12950, 10/92 10,882.68 714 12/09/08 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City
66 12954, 10/92 10,880.07 552 12/07/08 - retired 12/23, scrapped 2/24 at Salt Lake City

Note: No. 66 changed to No. 552 at Burnham, rest at Salt Lake City.

Received in two parts, the first half of the lot, numbers 61-63, was composed of two 'normal' engines and one Vauclain compound - numbers 61 and 62 were built with 19x24" cylinders, 66-inch drivers, and an engine weight of 119,160 lbs., while No. 63 was built with 14&24x24" cylinders, 66-inch drivers, and an engine weight of 123,300 lbs.; at their first appearance in the roster, at June 1, 1892, engines 61 and 62 are class 119, and engine 63 is class 123. Engines 64-66 were received in early November of 1892, all apparently being compound engines the same as No. 63. In the 1895 change of classes, engines 61 and 62 became class 19, and numbers 63-66, all still compound, become class 24. The 1897 adjustment of engine weights puts 61 and 62 at 124,000 lbs., and 63-66 at 130,150 lbs.

In the first half of 1900, No. 63 was rebuilt with 21&33x24-inch compound cylinders from the Richmond Loco. Wks., retaining its 66-inch drivers, but evidently experiencing an increase in engine weight to 137,000 lbs. In the second half of 1900, the No. 64 got the Richmond treatment, too, ending up essentially the same as the 63. Then, in 1901, somewhat curiously, the 66 is also rebuilt - to a 'simple' engine, with 19x24-inch cylinders, like the 61 and 62, and 66-inch drivers, but an engine weight of 127,850 lbs.

At the D&RG takeover, engines 61, 62 and 66 are assigned class 124, while the 63-65 are assigned clas 130. All six survive to be given D&RG numbers in 1908-09, but only two make it to the 1924 renumbering, and are assigned class T-19 - but these two don't last long, being scrapped in August 1924 at Salt Lake City.

See: Salt Lake Tribune, 5/13/92; 6/22/92; 11/6/92; 1/13/1900; 6/5/1900.

Baldwin 4-6-0, 70-73, 1897
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
70 15561, 11/97 715 1/21/09 526 scrapped 8/1924 at Salt Lake City
71 15562, 11/97 716 2/18/09 527 scrapped 8/1924 at Salt Lake City
72 15563, 11/97 717 5/15/09 528 scrapped 8/1924 at Salt Lake City
73 15564, 11/97 718 6/02/09 525 retired 11/26, scrapped 12/1926
Baldwin 2-6-0, 200-203, 1897
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
200 15578, 11/97 940 1/02/09 590 retired 10/25, scrapped 3/26, Salt Lake City
201 15579, 11/97 941 4/30/09 - sold 4/16/1917, Barry Equip. Co., $5,500
202 15580, 11/97 942 6/19/09 591 retired 10/25, scrapped 3/26, Salt Lake City
203 15581, 11/97 943 12/18/09 - sold 1/26/1917 to Colorado & Wyoming RR

The first new locomotives in five years, these were also the heaviest engines yet on the R.G.W. The 70-series 4-6-0 engines, Baldwin class 10/32D-581 through -584, spec sheet dated September 13, 1897, had 19x26" cylinders, 67" drivers, and an engine weight of 144,600 lbs.

As befits passenger engines, the 70-73 were painted black, with two coats of engine finishing varnish, and lettered in Gold leaf, "R. G. W. Ry." on the tank collar, "R. G. W." on cab panel, number on front number plate, sand box, and sides & back of tank. On the R.G.W., the 70-73 were assigned class 21. Cost, per the "Locomotives Retired" record, was $11,491.24 each.

The 200-series Mogul engines, Baldwin class 8/34D-11 through -14, spec sheet dated October 9, 1897, had 20x26" cylinders, 61" drivers, and an engine weight of 140,600 lbs. These engines were painted similarly to the 70-73, except that lettering was not in gold leaf. The cost, again as per the aforementioned record, is given as $11,998.77 each.

In the D&RG scheme of things, engines 70-73 became class 145, and, interestingly, gained a half-inch in cylinder diameter; the 200-203 moguls became class 141. All of these engines went through the 1908 change easily enough; two of the Moguls were sold in 1917, the remaining six engines got to the 1924 renumbering, the 4-6-0 engines becoming class T-19, and the two remaining Moguls a part of class G-28; half of the six were scrapped in 1924, the others in 1926.

See: Salt Lake Tribune, 1/8/1898; 1/1/1899; 7/8/1899.

Richmond 2-8-0, 300-303 and 400-403, 1900
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
300 3006, 7/1900 960 12/09/08 900 scrapped 7/1936
301 3007, 7/1900 961 4/01/09 901 scrapped 11 9/1936
302 3008, 7/1900 962 12/19/08 902 scrapped 5/1936
303 3009, 7/1900 963 8/21/09 903 scrapped 6/1936
400 3002, 7/1900 970 2/26/09 970 scrapped 5/1936
401 3003, 7/1900 971 12/09/08 971 retired 12/1929, scrapped 12/31/1929
402 3004, 7/1900 972 12/12/08 972 scrapped 5/1936
403 3005, 7/1900 973 3/30/09 973 scrapped 7/1936

These two groups of Richmond-built 2-8-0 engines were largely the same; both had 22x28" cylinders, and while the 300s had 56" drivers and an engine weight of 183,000 lbs, the 400s had 51" drivers and an engine weight of 179,600 lbs. Both groups were briefly assigned RGW class 28 before becoming D&RG classes 183 and 180, respectively, in 1901. Both groups survived intact through the 1924 renumbering, in which the former 300-series engines became class C-38, and the former 400-series engines, class C-42; all but one of these engines survived into the mid-1930s.

See: Salt Lake Tribune, 7/10/1900; 7/26/1900; 7/28/1900; 8/14/1900.

Schenectady 0-6-0, 21-23, 1900
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: Cost: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
21 5629, 6/00 10,593.62 805 12/09/08 20 retired 12/31/1928, scrapped
22 5638, 8/00   806 12/14/08 21 scrapped 9/1936
23 5635, 10/00   807 12/09/08 22 scrapped 9/1936

These engines, the arrivals of which were scattered across the latter part of 1900, were the first 'real' switch engines acquired by the R.G.W.; they had 19x24-inch cylinders, 51-inch drivers, an engine weight of 96,000 lbs., and typical slope-back switcher tenders.

Their R.G.W. class was "SW" (for SWitcher, we guess), and became D&RG class 96 in 1901. In the 1924 renumbering, these three engines became all of class S-23, numbers 20-22; one was scrapped in 1928, the other two in 1936.

See: Salt Lake Tribune, 6/28/1900; 7/2/1900; 10/13/1900.

Schenectady compound 2-6-0, 500-505, 1901
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
500 5718, 12/00 950 11/-/08 596 retired 10/27, scrapped 12/31/1927
501 5719, 12/00 951 3/11/09 597 retired 10/28, scrapped 12/31/1928
502 5720, 1/01 952 12/09/08 592 retired 10/25, scrapped 3/26, Salt Lake City
503 5721, 1/01 953 2/12/09 593 retired 10/25, scrapped 3/26, Salt Lake City
504 5722, 2/01 954 12/07/08 594 scrapped 12/31/1929
505 5723, 2/01 955 8/06/09 595 12/31/1928
Schenectady compound 4-6-0, 80-83, 1901
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
80 5724, 2/01 740 12/22/08 530 retired 10/1927, scrapped 12/1927
81 5725, 2/01 741 1/07/09 531 retired 10/1927, scrapped 12/1927
82 5726, 3/01 742 3/23/09 532 scrapped 12/1928
83 5727, 3/01 743 2/06/09* 533 retired 10/1927, scrapped 12/1927

Numbers 501, 504 and changed at Burnham; No. 81 changed at Grand Junction.

The last R.G.W. roster, No. 36, was dated January 1, 1901, so neither of these two classes appeared therein; they do appear on the proofs for D&RG roster No. 1, dated September 1, 1901, and in the actually-issued No. 1, dated April 1, 1902. The 500-series appears as class 154, with compound cylinders of 22-1/2&35x26 inches, 61-inch drivers, and engine weight of 154,400 lbs. These engines were rebuilt 'simple' in July 1907, with 20x26" cylinders; renumbered 950-955 in 1908-1909; in 1924 became part of class G-28, with the remainder of RGW 200-series Moguls. The 80-series appear in 1901-1902 roster as class 161, cylinders 22&34x26 inches, drivers of 67-inches, and engine weight of 161,500 lbs. Rebuilt 'simple' in 1906, with 20x26" cylinders; renumbered 1908-1909 to 740-743; 1924 to class T-24 numbers 530-533.

All of these engines were scrapped in 1926-1929. (Side note: the "Locomotives Retired" list shows the 500s as costing $12,554.77 each, and the 80s as costing $13,203.07 each.)

See: Salt Lake Tribune, 10/13/1900; 1/31/1901; 3/7/1901.

Baldwin compound 2-8-0, 700-704, 1901
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
700 18761, 2/01 990 1/16/09 930 scrapped -/1945
701 18762, 2/01 991 12/14/08 931 scrapped -/1945
702 18778, 2/01 992 12/09/08 932 scrapped -/1946
703 18779, 2/01 993 12/19/08 933 scrapped -/1945
704 18780, 2/01 994 2/26/09 934 scrapped -/1945

The R. G. W. purchased compound engines in three lots, from three builders, in 1901; this lot from Baldwin was the second. Baldwin spec sheet for this lot, being Baldwin class 10-28/50E-80 through -84, show specifications as 17&28x30-inch cylinders, 57-inch drivers, an engine weight of 'about' 192,000 lbs, boiler pressure of 200psi, and a tender to hold 6,000 gallons of water. They were Vauclain compound numbers 1829-1833, and to be painted black, no striping, lettering in Aluminum, "R. G. W. Ry." on tank collar, "R. G. W." on cab panel, number on front plate, sand box, and tank sides & back.

The earliest rosters, 1901-1902, show these engines as class 199, with an engine weight of 199,000 lbs.; they were rebuilt 'simple' in March 1907, with 21x30" cylinders. Renumbered 1908-1909 to 990-994; 1924 to numbers 930-934, class C-40; all scrapped 1945-46.

Richmond compound 2-8-0, 600-604, 1901
RGW
Number:
c/n, & date: 1908
D&RG
Number:
Date changed: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
600 3184, 7/01 980 2/26/09 940 scrapped 6/1936
601 3185, 7/01 981 12/30/09 941 scrapped 7/1936
602 3186, 7/01 982 10/28/09 942 scrapped 7/1936
603 3187, 7/01 983 1/02/09 943 scrapped 6/1936
604 3188, 7/01 984 4/16/09 944 scrapped 6/1936

The third of three lots of compound engines, from three builders, to be acquired in 1901, these Richmond engines arrived with 23-1/2&36x30-inch cylinders, 56-inch drivers, and an engine weight of 186,000 Lbs. Assigned D&RG class 186 in 1901 (immediately after, if not upon, arrival), these engines, too, were rebuilt 'simple' in March 1907, with 21x30-inch cylinders; renumbered 980-984 in 1909; to 940-944 in 1924, and put in class C-40; all scrapped in June and July of 1936.

See: Salt Lake Tribune, 12/3/1900.

American Locomotive Co., Schenectady Works, 2-8-0, 1180-1199, 1906
RGW
Number:
c/n: Scrapped:
1180 40125 No. 1180 was sold January 9, 1956 to Geneva Steel.
1181 40126 10/1949
1182 40127 8/1953
1183 40128 8/1953
1184 40129 9/1956
1185 40130 12/1956
1186 40131 7/1954
1187 40132 4/1949
1188 40133 3/1950
1189 40134 6/1955
1190 40522 4/1950
1191 40523 7/1954
1192 40524 9/1956
1193 40525 7/1954
1194 40526 11/1956
1195 40527 10/1956
1196 40528 6/1955
1197 40529 6/1954
1198 40530 1/1955
1199 40531 2/1955

These engines were part of an order for forty, divided 20 each for the D&RG and the R.G.W.; both roads got their 20 in two lots of ten each, all built in 1906. As delivered, these engines had 23x28" cylinders, 57" drivers, and engine weight of 220,400 lbs, and were assigned class 220 on both roads. Having been ordered with a D&RG-compatible number series, these engines were in no need of renumbering in 1908, and neither were they renumbered in 1924, though the class was changed, to C-48. A couple of these engines were scrapped in 1949, but most made it into the mid-1950s, and a few were active in the last days of D&RGW standard-gauge steam, in late 1956.

Baldwin 0-6-0, 836-840, April 1907
RGW
Number:
c/n: 1924
Number:
Disposition:
836 30695 55 sold 9/1943 to Columbia Steel Co., Geneva, Utah
837 30696 56 sold 3/1943 to Columbia Steel Co., Geneva, Utah
838 30697 57 sold 7/1943 to Columbia Steel Co., Geneva, Utah
839 30699 58 scrapped 7/1952
840 30725 59 scrapped 8/1952

These 0-6-0 locomotives, switchers, were the last engines received as "R.G.W." engines; while not usually listed as such in other publications, these engines are listed in the R.G.W. portions of both D&RG roster No. 9, January 1, 1912, and No. 10, April 1, 1916. Assigned class 149, these engines had 20x26" cylinders, 51" drivers, and an engine weight of 150,000 lbs. To numbers 55-59, class S-33, in 1924; three sold in 1943, two scrapped in 1952.

These engines were of Baldwin class 6/34D; the serial numbers within that class are at hand; they were 6/34D-607 through -611.

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