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Salt Lake City Streetcars

Index For This Page

This page was last updated on June 13, 2015.

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(This is a work in progress; research continues.)

Timeline

March 6, 1872
Two cars for the new Salt Lake City street railroad arrived yesterday from the East, where purchased by John W. Young. Iron to arrive shortly. (Deseret Evening News, March 6, 1872)

August 15, 1872
"Local Brevities." "A track is to be laid from the depot to the Temple block strong enough to permit a locomotive to haul the cars of rock upon it. The horse railroad is found to be not sufficiently strong." (Utah Mining Journal, August 15, 1872)

August 21, 1872
"Local Brevities." "Temple street is well cut with railroad tracks, the new one being put down by the Church. These tracks leave no room on that side of the street for teams to pass, and the draymen complain bitterly of the situation of affairs. They are compelled to pay license, and yet the streets are practically closed to them. That street will be almost impassable in the winter to loaded drays." (Utah Mining Journal, August 21, 1872)

September 26, 1872
The Salt Lake City street railroad has added a third car, larger than other two. (Salt Lake Herald, September 26, 1872)

October 29, 1873
Salt Lake City Railroad completed the junction at the intersection of South Temple Street and Second West Street. This junction was referred to as "Warm Springs junction." "One of W. J. Silver's self-acting switches has been put down and works admirably." cars were to be put on the Warm Springs Division "at once." (Deseret News, October 29, 1873, "today")

July 22, 1874
From 'Ogden Junction' of Twenty-First - Steam dummy, for Salt Lake City Railroad, is at Ogden. (Salt Lake Herald, July 22, 1874)

July 28, 1874
The new steam streetcar (also known as a "dummy") for Salt Lake City was tried yesterday afternoon. (Salt Lake Herald, July 28, 1874)

August 7, 1874
The steam dummy is in use on the Warm Springs line of the Salt Lake City street car system, making regular trips. (Salt Lake Herald, August 7, 1874)

September 21, 1876
A new Salt Lake City streetcar, no. 12, built by the Utah Central shops. (Salt Lake Herald, September 21, 1876)

May 23, 1877
"Steam plowing. -- Some years ago a car was driven over the rails in the streets of Salt Lake City, by a steam engine, but by some mismanagement it was found not to give satisfaction, both as to noise and wear." Now it is used as a steam tractor on President Young's farm, near Jordan, on the west side. With it, can plow an acre an hour, two men running it 'easily'. The thing is the property of John. W. Young. (The Utah County Enquirer, Provo, May 23, 1877)

January 1, 1883
The Salt Lake City Street Railroad has 14 cars, four of which were received in 1882; and two more are en route. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 1, 1883)

Electrification

August 8, 1889
The first electric streetcar ran in Salt Lake City. (Salt Lake Tribune, August 9, 1889)

August 9, 1889
Half a column on the trial trip, last evening, of the first electric streetcar in Salt Lake; on First South line, from Utah & Nevada depot to Thirteenth East. (Salt Lake Herald, August 9, 1889)

January 14, 1890
Salt Lake Rapid Transit Company was organized. Initial routes were stated as being: 1) on Fourth South in Salt Lake City, from the Fort Douglas Military Reservation west to the Jordan River; 2) on Seventh South from the Fort Douglas Military Reservation west to the Jordan River; and 3) from the south limits of Salt Lake City by the most convenient route north to Beck's Hot Springs; total route miles were put at about 30 miles, including the above three routes and  routes on other un-stated city streets. (Utah Corporation Index 4333)

April 14, 1890
West Side Rapid Transit Company was organized. (Utah Corporation Index 4335)

July 8, 1890
Popperton Place and Fort Douglas Rapid Transit Company was organized to build along South Temple from East Temple (Main Street) to and within Fort Douglas. (Utah Corporation Index 721, and Index 4340)

November 24, 1890
East Bench Street Railway was organized to build from a point at Seventh East on the south city limits of Salt Lake City, then east along the street running at or near the south line of the city limits to Eleventh East (also known as the Upper County Road), then south along Eleventh East to its intersection with the county road running east and west along the south side of Block No. 45 in 10 acre plat "A", then east along the same county road to the southeast corner of Block No. 10 of five acre plat "C", a total length of about 3-1/2 miles. (Utah Corporation Index 806, and Index 4342)

December 15, 1890
The new electric line to Fort Douglas, connecting with the line in Second South, passing the Salt Lake Brewing Company, thence to Mount Olivet cemetery, and terminating at the U. S. Army's Quartermaster's Office. Track has been laid and wire is now being installed. (Salt Lake Journal of Commerce, December 15, 1890, Volume 4, Number 11)

January 20, 1891
An electrified streetcar line of the Salt Lake City Railroad has been completed to Fort Douglas. (Salt Lake Daily Herald, January 20, 1891)

May 20, 1891
The Salt Lake (Street) Railway company is taking up the 20 pound rail from its First South route, between Second and Eleventh East - replacing it with 35 pound steel - and the old 20 pound rail being sold to W. S. Godbe, who is taking it to Pioche, Nevada, to use on his tramways there. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 20, 1891)

January 1, 1892
Salt Lake Rapid Transit Co., organized in January 1890, now has 30 miles of track, part of which is the Popperton Place & Fort Douglas road. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 1, 1892)

January 10, 1892
First run over the Popperton Place & Fort Douglas to be on January 12th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 10, 1892)

February 20, 1892
J. G. Jacobs is manager of the West Side Rapid Transit Company. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 20, 1892)

June 22, 1894
Valuations published for the following street railways:

December 22, 1900
Salt Lake Rapid Transit president J. S. Cameron returned from the east where he ordered, from Colorado Fuel and Iron, 250 tons of sixty-pound steel rail to replace the line's old iron rails. (Salt Lake Tribune, December 22, 1900)

Consolidated Railway & Power Company

July 30, 1901
Consolidated Railway & Power Company was organized, as a consolidation of four existing street railway routes, including the following:

November 15, 1901
Description of the route of the West Side Rapid Transit Co.:

March 24, 1902
Salt Lake & Jordan Valley Railroad organized as a reorganization of the West Side Rapid Transit Co., to construct a railway line from Salt Lake City to Bingham. Rumored to be controlled by L. L. Nunn and Thomas Kearns. Operated a street railway from Second South and First West, to the "Cannon Farm" at about Eighth West (900 West) and California Avenue (about 1350 South). Owned by L. L. Nunn for "some time". (part from Salt Lake Tribune, March 25, 1902)

West Side Rapid Transit was organized in April 1890, and completed a short piece of trackage along First West; not included as part of the merger that created Consolidated Railway & Power in 1901.

August 11, 1902
Franchise granted to Salt Lake & Suburban Railway. (Salt Lake Tribune, August 12, 1902) Organized in Dover, Delaware on July 9, 1902. (Salt Lake Tribune, July 10, 1902)

July 31, 1902
Franchise of Consolidated Railway & Power Co. to operate the route of the reportedly competing Salt Lake & Suburban Railway, was extended from Murray to Bingham Junction, then to Sandy, within a year. To acquire six new cars to operate new service. (Salt Lake Tribune July 31, 1902)

January 10, 1903
Salt Lake City council allowed the Salt Lake City Railroad to decide about car fenders. (Street Railway Journal, Volume 21, Number 2, January 10, 1903, page 93)

October 17, 1903
Item about Consolidated Railway and Power construction. (Street Railway Journal, Volume 22, Number 16, October 17, 1903, page 741)

Utah Light & Railway Company

January 2, 1904
Utah Light & Railway Company was organized as a consolidation of Utah Power & Light Company, and Consolidated Railway & Power Company. (Utah Corporation Index 4644)

A descriptive memoranda of the railway property was completed at the time of the organization of Utah Light & Railway Co., and showed the following:

August 4, 1904
"J. G. Jacobs is the original builder of the West Side Rapid Transit. In the beginning it was known as the Salt Lake & Utah Valley road. It was built in 1891 and the intention was to run it to the lake and establish a resort at the terminus. At the beginning it was run the full seven miles. Soon after that the panic came and the property passed into the possession of L. L. Nunn. Now it runs only to the Cannon farm in the southwestern part of the city." (Salt Lake Herald, August 4, 1904)

March 1, 1905
Report of conditions and operations for 1904. (Edwards Notes: Salt Lake Tribune?, March 1, 1905)

October 27, 1906
E. H. Harriman closed the deal for the purchase of Utah Light & Railway Company, the street car system in Salt Lake City. Management and operation was to be turned over to the Oregon Short Line Railroad, Harriman's steam railroad in Utah, with the same directors and officers. Harriman was reported to having purchased three-fifths of the stock of Utah Light & Railway Company. (Inter-Mountain Republican, October 28, 1906, "yesterday")

December 1906
E. H. Harriman bought controlling interest in Utah Light & Railway, the street car company in Salt Lake City, operated as a subsidiary of Oregon Short Line. Most of the stock came from the LDS Church, at a reported price of over $10 million. (Arrington: Great Basin, p. 408)

March 16, 1907
Item about new carbarns for Salt Lake City. (Street Railway Journal, Volume 29, Number 11, March 16, 1907, page 429)

April 27, 1907
Historical sketch of predecessor companies. (Edwards Notes: Salt Lake Tribune, April 27, 1907)

July 18, 1907
The Salt Lake City council approved Utah Light & Railway's request for unhindered permission and access to start a $3 million upgrade of all of its tracks and routes. The council, however, did deny the railway's request that it use the tracks for freight service between Midnight and 6 o'clock. The railway's attorney pointed out that the city benefited directly in the amount $40,000 in the reduction of city business-related fares from 5 cents to 4 cents, as well as another $10,000 for other city-related purposes. This included both railway and power fees. (Salt Lake Herald, July 19, 1907, "yesterday")

March 24, 1908
Seventeen new cars to arrive. (Edwards Notes: Salt Lake Tribune, March 24, 1908)

1909
Historical sketch and description of improvements made by Harriman interests. (Edwards Notes: Salt Lake Tribune, January 3, 1909)

March 23, 1909
Murray City granted a franchise for Utah Light & Traction to operate through the city. (Utah PSC Case 6-A)

September 9, 1909
Edward H. Harriman died (Wikipedia). His interest in Utah Light & Railway was held by Oregon Short Railroad.

October 1909
"Rehabilitation of the Utah Light & Railway Property" A description of the improvements made by Harriman, including a cross section of a street, a track layout drawing of the block of new car house and shops (now known as Trolley Square), and an elevation detail drawing of the end arches and roof trusses of the new car house. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 34, Number 14, October 2, 1909, page 517)

1910
St. Louis Car Company shipped 12 new "semi-convertible" cars to Utah Light & Railway. The cars were 34 feet, 4-1/2 inches long over the corner posts, with an overall length of 45 feet, 4-1/2 inches. A photo shows car number 602. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 36, Number 27, December 31, 1910, pages 1284, 1285)

December 10, 1910
"New Shops of Utah Light & Railway Company" A description and numerous elevation and floor plan drawings of the new car house and shops. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 36, Number 24, December 10, 1910, pages 1138-1142, copied November 2, 1981)

(The original Salt Lake City RR shops at 1st South and 2nd East were later closed; Freed Motor Co. car dealership, moved to the site in November 1932, from location at 164 East Broadway, selling DeSoto, Plymouth, and Reo trucks, see Salt Lake Tribune, February 24, 1935)

December 31, 1910
Semi convertible cars for Utah Light and Railway, with photo of no. 602, from St. Louis Car Company. (Street Railway Journal, Volume 36, Number 27, December 31, 1910, pages 1284, 1285, copied November 2, 1981)

October 14, 1911
Item about wheel grader, with photo partially showing cars 101 and 102, both open single truck cars. (Street Railway Journal, Volume 38, Number 16, October 14, 1911, page 873)

June 15, 1912
Article, with photo and plan of Salt Lake City sand house. (Street Railway Journal, Volume 39, Number 24, June 15, 1912, page 1035)

July 10, 1912
Extension to Holiday was placed into service. (Edwards Notes: Salt Lake Tribune)

March 30, 1913
The first streetcar operated on Capital Hill. (Edwards Notes: Salt Lake Tribune, April 1, 1913)

August 28, 1913
Streetcar service to Bountiful to be extended to Centerville. (Edwards Notes: Salt Lake Tribune, August 28, 1913)

December 27, 1913
Service to Centerville started. (Edwards Notes: Salt Lake Tribune)

January 1914
W. H. Bancroft, who was 74 years old at the time, resigned his positions with Oregon Short Line, but retained his position as president of UL&Ry, and vice president of SPLA&SL. (Electric Railway Journal, February 7, 1914, page 338)

August 6, 1914
Salt Lake Light & Traction Company organized by O. J. Salisbury and A. H. Parsons. (Utah Corporation Index 10792)

Utah Light & Traction Company

September 12, 1914
Item about financial matters of the Utah Light and Traction. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 44, Number 11, September 12, 1914, page 500-501)

Utah Light & Railway Company, Salt Lake City, Utah. -- The Utah Power & Light Company has applied to the Salt Lake City Commission for permission to purchase the Utah Light & Railway Company, which owns and operates an electric railway and electric light and power system in Salt Lake City and adjoining towns, as well as a gas, electric and power system in Ogden. This is merely a formal step. As noted in the ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL of Sept. 6, the Salt Lake Light & Traction Company has been incorporated by officials of the Utah Power & Light Company to take over the Utah Light & Railway Company, and if the plan is successful this new company will own the 98 per cent interest in the common and preferred stocks of the Utah Light & Railway Company, which is now owned by the Union Pacific interests through the Oregon Short Line. The stockholders of the Utah Light & Railway Company are to vote on Sept. 18 on the question of approving the sale of their properties. The Utah Power & Light Company, the issued stock of which is owned by the Utah Securities Company, is to own all the outstanding stock of the Salt Lake Light & Traction Company and will finance the acquisition of the Utah Light & Railway Company by means of its own treasury and securities now on band. The acquisition will give full control of the electric business in both Salt Lake City and Ogden to the Utah Power & Light Company.

Utah Light & Traction was organized as a subsidiary of Utah Power & Light, to consolidate its interests in Utah Light & Railway and Salt Lake Light & Traction. (R. W. Edwards Notes)

September 18, 1914
From Poor's Manual of Railroads, 1917, pages 256-257, Union Pacific entry:

Utah Light and Traction Co. -- The Oregon Short Line RR. Co., owned for a number of years $995,000, face value, of the bonds 99.47% of the preferred, and 95.42% of the common stock of the Utah Light and Railway Co., which owned and operated street railways and an electric light and power system in Salt Lake City; and in addition to its investment in stock, the Oregon Short Line had advanced from time to time money for the reconstruction, extension and improvement of the electric properties, so that on Sept. 18, 1914, its total investment aggregated $9,931,119. The electric properties were prosperous and in good condition, but had not proved of value to the Union Pacific System as a traffic connection or otherwise than as an investment. Advantage was therefore taken, in September, 1914, of an opportunity to settle the entire stock, bonds and debt of the Utah Light and Railway Co., held by the Oregon Short Line, for $930,010.09 in cash and $11,661,000, face value ($12,591,010 total), of 30-year first and refunding mortgage 5% bonds, secured by a mortgage (subject only to $3,816.000 underlying bonds) on tho street railways, the electric light and power system and all other properties of the Utah Light and Railway Co. The bonds and mortgages were executed by the Utah Light and Traction Co., which took over the properties of the Utah Light and Railway Co., and the bonds were guaranteed as to principal and interest by the Utah Power and Light Co. The bonds received were taken into account and are included in the assets as reported in the general balance sheet, at the amount of the investment in the old company, less the cash payment of $930,010.09. As an incident of the transaction, the Oregon Short Line RR. Co. agreed to purchase additionol first and refunding 5% bonds of the Utah Light and Traction Co., similarly guaranteed, which should be thereafter iss'ued against expenditures made prior to Sept. 1, 1915, for certain limited betterments and additions to tbe mortgaged properties. Pursuant to this agreement, $475,000 additional bonds have been acquired, making the aggregate amount of said bonds held Dec. 31, 1916, $12,136,000 face value. (accessed February 4, 2014 via Google Books)

September 18, 1914
An internal history of UL&T showed September 18, 1914 as the date that the property and interests of Utah Light & Railway Co. were taken over by Utah Light & Traction Co. (History of Utah Light & Traction Company, dated Septemeber 25, 1939)

October 24, 1914
The sale of Utah Light & Railway: "Local and eastern Capitalists associated with Utah Light & Railway Company of Salt Lake City, and Electric Bond & Share Company, of New York, have purchased from the Harriman system a controlling interest of the Utah Light & Railway Company and have organized the Utah Light & Traction Company to take over the property, the Utah Light & Railway Company passing out of existence by the transaction." (Electrical Review and Western Electrician, October 24, 1914, page 829, accessed via Google Books)

January 2, 1915
Utah Light & Traction Company leased all of its power generation and distribution systems to Utah Power & Light Company. (Utah PSC Case 6-A)

February 27, 1915
Item about control of Utah Light and Traction. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 45, Number 9, February 27, 1915, page 435)

1917
In a petition before the Utah Public Utilities Commission to raise rates, Utah Light and Traction Co., showed the following mileage and number of cars for 1910 to the first six months of 1917:

Year Miles
of Track
Quantity
of Cars
1910 116.47 91
1911 121.35 91
1912 132.09 95
1913 142.63 101
1914 145.18 112
1915 145.26 112
1916 145.74 112
1917
(6 months)
145.89 118

August 1917
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to change its schedule of rates and fares. The company had 165 cars in service and it was paying license fees on 112 cars. The following thirteen cars were obsolete and not in use: numbers 7-10 (4 cars); 84-87 (4 cars); and 150-154 (5 cars). Car numbers 119-132 (14 cars) were stored and not regularly being used. (Utah PSC Case 6-A)

March 23, 1918
Item about Utah Light and Traction's own newspaper. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 51, Number 12, March 23, 1918, page 589)

September 21, 1918
News item about Utah Light and Traction falling revenue. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 52, Number 12, September 21, 1918, page 523)

September 1919
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to abandon part of its Center Street Line between Second North and Clinton Avenue, due to the city wanting to pave Second North. The Center Street Line ran from the D&RG depot at Third South and Fourth West, east to Main Street, then north to Center Street, then northerly to Warm Springs, then northerly to Beck Street to North Salt Lake. Application withdrawn for an unspecified reason. (Utah PSC Case 169)

August 7, 1920
Annual report of Utah Light and Traction comparing 1918 and 1919. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 56, Number 6, August 7, 1920, page 289)

January 18, 1921
The Utah Public Utilities Commission dismissed Utah Light & Traction Company's application to abandon and dismantle the line along Seventh South, from the east bank of the Jordan River, including the bridge over the river, to Eleventh West, then south to Indiana Avenue, then west to Cheyenne Street. The line was originally built by the Salt Lake Rapid Transit Company. The franchise was granted on May 6, 1890, and the franchise was extended on April 18, 1894. (Utah PSC Case 326)

September 3, 1921
Article, with photos and map, of Utah Light and Traction. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 58, Number 10, September 3, 1921, pages 347-351)

1922
OSL sold its interest in Utah Light & Traction Company, the street car line in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Poor's, 1929, p. 1051)

September 5, 1925
Item, with photo, of early mule-driven car for parade. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 66, Number 10, September 5, 1925, page 374)

September 19, 1925
Item, with photo, of Utah Light and Traction car specially painted to advertize Saltair. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 66, Number 12, September 19, 1925, page 451)

February 27, 1926
Item about Utah Light and Traction and Bamberger bus service petitions. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 67, Number 9, February 27, 1926, page 378)

August 11, 1926
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue service on the Third East Line, which runs along Seventh South, from State Street to Third East, then south along Third East to Ninth South.

Utah Light & Traction was ordered to extend the Seventh South Line along Seventh South from Third East to Fourth East, then south along Fourth East to Ninth South. (Utah PSC Case 895)

September 20, 1926
Utah Light & Traction Company discontinued streetcar service on the Centerville Line, between the Salt Lake/Davis county line and Centerville on Monday September 20, 1926. Utah Light & Traction shut down its Bountiful substation at 2:20 p.m. on Wednesday September 22, 1926. The station had operated for 12 years. (Utah PSC Case 863, approval dated September 13, 1926; Davis County Clipper, September 24, 1926, page 5, "Bountiful Briefs")

October 16, 1926
Item about Utah Light and Traction replacing Centerville street car service with bus service. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 68, Number 16, October 16, 1926, page 747)

April 16, 1927
Article, with photos, of Utah Light and Traction work car no. 03. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 69, Number 16, April 16, 1927, page 697)

June 10, 1927
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service and remove tracks from South Temple between E Street and Virginia Street. The line was constructed in 1907. Salt Lake City is paving South Temple. Utah Light & Traction's share of the cost would be $39,247.00, a third of the cost. (Utah PSC Case 965)

August 6, 1927
Article about Utah Light and Traction rebuilt cars, with photos and specifications. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 70, Number 6, August 6, 1927, pages 230-234)

September 14, 1927
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue North Yard Line, between North Temple and West Ninth North. (Utah PSC Case 977)

September 21, 1927
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service on the Murray-Midvale-Sandy Line along State Street south of Forty-Eighth South. (Utah PSC Case 982)

October 1, 1927
Item about Utah Light and Traction bus service to Sandy. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 70, Number 14, October 1, 1927, page 610)

October 2, 1927
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service on the Seventh South Line, along Seventh South from West Temple to Eighth West. The application was submitted because of heavy maintenance charges due to crossings over the steam roads. (Utah PSC Case 978)

October 15, 1927
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service on the Holladay Line south of Thirty-Third South. The line was constructed in 1912 and ran along the east side of Highland Drive from the intersection of Eleventh East and Twenty-First South to Forty-Eighth South, then along the north side of Forty-Eighth South to its end at Holladay. (Utah PSC Case 979)

On the same day the Public Utilities Commission gave Utah Light & Traction permission to operate a bus route along Highland Drive from Thirty-Third South to Holladay. (Utah PSC Case 981)

March 23, 1928
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval, in Case 1014, to discontinue streetcar service on four different routes, all constructed in 1904 to 1914. A description of the lines to be abandoned was included in an April 30, 1928 "Release of Mortgage", as follows:

The Public Utilities Commission denied the traction company's request to discontinue service on the West Temple Line, which was single track along West Temple from Ninth South to Twenty-First South; 1.72 miles (9,093 feet) of single track.

The April 30, 1928 "Release of Mortgage" also included descriptions of the following lines:

July 9, 1928
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service on the Fourth East Line. Along Seventh South from State Street to Third East, then south along Third East to Ninth South, then east along Ninth South to Fourth East, then south along Fourth East to Twenty-First South.

The Public Utilities Commission also approved the traction company's request to start electric coach service along Main Street from South Temple to Seventh South, then east along Seventh South to Fourth East, then south along Fourth East to Twenty-First South. Utah Light & Traction wanted to substitute electric coach service for streetcar service along the Fourth East line because Salt Lake City is paving Fourth East and it would cost Utah Light & Traction $170,000.00 for its share of the paving and to pay for the rehabilitation of the streetcar tracks. (Utah PSC Case 1038)

July 28, 1928
Item, with photo, of test of Salt Lake City trackless trolley in Cokes, New York on July 23, 1928. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 72, Number 4, July 28, 1928, page 167)

August 8, 1928
Utah Public Utilities Commission denied Utah Light & Traction Company's application to discontinue operation of the Mill Creek bus line. The bus operates along Thirty-Third South from Highland Drive to Twenty-Third East, then to the Mill Creek Ward House. (Utah PSC Case 980)

August 9, 1928
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to extend streetcar service along West Temple from Twenty-First South to D&RGW's Park City Branch, and to operate over D&RGW's tracks to Roper Yard at Fifth West and Twenty-First South. (Utah PSC Case 1056)

August 25, 1928
Item, with photo, about Salt Lake City trackless trolley test in Salt Lake City on August 20, 1928. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 72, Number 8, August 25, 1928, page 315)

September 8, 1928
Article, with photos, of Salt Lake City trackless trolley (photo of numbers 300 and 301). (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 72, Number 10, September 8, 1928, page 427)

February 9, 1929
Article, with photos and map, of Salt Lake City trackless trolley, including plans, specifications, and photo of no. 304 and photo of interior of car. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 73, Number 5, February 9, 1929, pages 232-236, 5 pages)

April 5, 1929
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to cut streetcar service back to Warm Springs during off-peak hours and provide streetcar service to Terminal only during rush hours. The motor bus for the Davis County Line was to connect with the streetcar at all times, either at Warm Springs or at Terminal. The motor bus service to Val Verda was to remain unchanged. (Utah PSC Case 1075, application dated November 14, 1928; approval dated April 5, 1929)

In Case 1063 (dismissed by Case 1075) Utah Light & Traction applied to discontinue motor bus service between White's Hill and Highway in Bountiful, via the Val Verda district. Streetcar service north of the north city limits of Salt Lake City was discontinued on September 20, 1926, per order in Public Utilities Commission Case 863. The point on Beck Street at the Salt Lake/Davis county line where passengers transferred from streetcars to motor buses was called Terminal.

Also in Case 1063 Utah Light & Traction stated that the route of the motor bus Davis County Line left the paved highway at White's Hill and that the unpaved route along County Road No. 2 (present day Orchard Drive) was causing wear and tear on the buses. The buses being used on the route were made by Mack and made trip after trip without a single passenger; practically every family along the route owns an automobile. (Utah PSC Case 1063, application dated August 16, 1928; canceled and dismissed on April 5, 1929)

June 14, 1929
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service along Ninth East. Also to start electric coach service along First South from Main Street to State Street, then south along State Street to Third South, then east along Third South to Ninth East, then south along Ninth South to Parkway Avenue (about Twenty-Fifth South). (Utah PSC Case 1112)

December 19, 1929
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service along Fifteenth East from Seventeenth South to Twenty-First South. Also to substitute motor bus service along the same route. Salt Lake City is paving Fifteenth East and Utah Light & Traction's share of the paving costs, along with the costs of rehabilitation of the streetcar line, would be $27,000.00. (Utah PSC Case 1123, application dated December 16, 1929)

August 1, 1930
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to extend electric coach service along Fifth East from Main Street to Seventh East, in order to connect with its car barns. Also to extend electric coach service north along Main Street from South Temple to Second North, then east along West Canyon Road, then north along West Canyon Road to the east entrance of the state capital building. (Supplement to PSC Case 1038)

September 15, 1930
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service on the Warm Springs Line, and to substitute electric coach service along the same route. The route ran west along Second South from Main Street to West Temple, then north along West Temple to North Temple, then west along North Temple to Second West, then north along Second West to Beck Street, then north along Beck Street to Ninth North (Warm Springs). The tracks were to remain in place north along Second West to West High School and streetcar service would be continued during morning and evening hours during the school season. (Utah PSC Case 1174)

December 16, 1930
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service along West Temple between Fifth South to Thirteenth South and to discontinue motor bus service along West Temple between Thirteenth South and Twenty-First South. To replace the streetcar/motor bus service with electric coach service along West Temple from Second South to Twenty-First South.

To start electric coach service along First South from West Temple to Main Street and along Fourth South from West Temple to Main Street. (Utah PSC Case 1254)

April 20, 1931
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service, and to remove its tracks from along West Temple, from Thirteenth South to Twenty-First South. The line was constructed in 1912. Salt Lake City is paving West Temple and Utah Light & Traction's share of the paving, along with the cost of rehabilitation of the streetcar tracks is $42,000.00. The Public Utilities Commission approval was given with the condition that Utah Light & Traction would provide motor bus service or trackless trolley service in lieu of streetcar service. (Utah PSC Case 1208)

May 1931
Diagram of Utah Light and Traction Salt Lake City car barns with tracks converted for trolley bus use. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 75, Number 5, May 1931, page 248)

May 1931
Article about trolley bus maintenance for Salt Lake City. (Electric Railway Journal, Volume 75, Number 5, May 1931, page 249)

May 9, 1932
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue motor bus service between Bountiful High School (at Fourth North and Main Street in Bountiful) and the north city limits of Centerville. Six daily trips were provided along the route, with no service provided on Sundays and holidays. Bountiful High School was the terminal of the Val Verda motor bus service from Fifteenth North and Beck Street in Salt Lake City, which was the connection between the motor bus and the street cars.

The Commission's decision also approved Bamberger Transportation Company's request that they be allowed to take passengers over the route, at the passenger's request. (Utah PSC Case 1272)

July 9, 1932
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue motor bus service along Highland Drive to Holladay, from a connection with the streetcar at Sugar House, and to substitute Salt Lake City to Holladay direct motor bus service, but on a less frequent schedule. (Utah PSC Case 1284)

October 15, 1932
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue the Upper Road motor bus route, from Fifteenth North and Beck Street in Salt Lake City north to Bountiful high School, at Fourth North and Main Street in Bountiful, by way of Val Verda. Motor bus No. 11 is used on the route because it has softer springs and the road is very bumpy. The Public Utilities Commission approved the application with the condition that Utah Light & Traction continue to provide motor bus service along U. S. Highway 91, north from Salt Lake City to Bountiful. (Utah PSC Case 1290)

December 1, 1932
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to remove the streetcar tracks from U. S. Highway 91 from Fifteenth North and Beck Street north to a point called Terminal, 200 to 300 feet north of the Salt Lake/Davis County line, consisting of 8,400 feet (1.59 miles) of trackage. Utah Light & Traction made the request because the Utah State Road Commission wants to widen the highway from 20 feet to 40 feet. The streetcar tracks have not been used since March 4, 1932. (Utah PSC Case 1297)

August 7, 1933
The Utah Public Utilities Commission dismissed Utah Light & Traction's request to discontinue streetcar service and to remove the tracks from Route No. 17, along Second South west from Eighth West to Orange Street. The tracks were laid in 1911, with the bridge over the Jordan River put in by American Bridge Company in 1910. Car No. 11 is used on the route. Utah Light & Traction wants to discontinue the route because its crossing over the OSL is in need of repairs. (Utah PSC Case 1287)

November 15, 1933
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to substitute gasoline motor bus service for streetcar service, to discontinue streetcar service, and to remove the tracks for Route 12, south along State Street from Ninth South to Regal Avenue in Murray. 5.57 miles of trackage. (Utah PSC Case 1432)

October 19, 1934
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to remove the streetcar tracks from along Second West and Beck Street from First North to Fifteenth North. The route is double track along Second West from First North to Agate Street, then single track along Second West, Beck Street, Everett Avenue, and Hot Springs Street to the terminus at Fifteenth North and Beck Street.

Also to remove the tracks from the single track streetcar route west along Fifth North from Second West to the material yards on Fifth North (at about Fifth West). Access to the material yards is available by other routes.

Electric trolley coach service was allowed along the route, and streetcars were last operated, on September 15, 1930 (Case 1174) and the tracks are no longer needed.

The Utah State Road Commission intends to resurface Second West and Beck Street. Utah Light & Traction was joined in the application by the Utah State Road Commission and Salt Lake City Corporation. (Utah PSC Case 1619)

June 21, 1935
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to remove the streetcar tracks along Twenty-First South from Eleventh east to Fifteenth East. The tracks are no longer used because the streetcar service was replaced by gasoline motor bus service south along Fifteenth east to Twenty-First South, then west along Twenty-First South to Eleventh east. The Utah State Road Commission was making plans to widen, straighten, and resurface Twenty-First South. (Utah PSC Case 1773)

August 3, 1935
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service along Route 1 (Ninth Avenue Line), Route 2 (Sixth Avenue Line), and Route 3 (Third Avenue-Fort Douglas Line). The routes were described as:

August 3, 1935
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to remove the streetcar tracks from the following streets:

Motor bus service was substituted for streetcar service on all of the routes. The application was made because Salt Lake City intends to improve and resurface all of the streets. (Utah PSC Case 1786)

November 15, 1935
The Utah Public Utilities Commission dismissed Utah Light & Traction's request to discontinue gasoline motor bus service along Twenty-First South from Eleventh East and Twenty-First East, and along Fifteenth East from Seventeenth South to Twenty-First South. Street car service was discontinued on March 25, 1930, as allowed in Case 1123 on December 19, 1929. (Utah PSC Case 1663)

July 16, 1936
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service on the combined Route 6 (East Third South) and Route 23 (State Capitol), and to substitute gasoline motor bus service on the same routes. The following description of the routes was given:

August 22, 1936
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to remove the streetcar tracks from former streetcar Route 1 (Ninth Avenue Line) and Route 2 (Sixth Avenue Line). Both routes were being operated with gasoline motor buses and the tracks were no longer needed. (Utah PSC Case 1888)

June 1, 1937
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to remove the streetcar tracks along West Temple, as follows:

July 22, 1937
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service along Routes 5, 8, and 10, all in the southeast sector of Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County, described as follows:

Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to remove the streetcar tracks along South Temple Street east from State Street to E Street, then north to Third Avenue, then east to and through Fort Douglas. Formerly used by part of Route 3 (Third Avenue-Fort Douglas Line). Street railway service had been discontinued and replaced by motor bus service in August 1935. (Supplement to Utah PSC Case 1783)

May 20, 1938
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to complete the following:

August 1, 1939
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue rush-hour streetcar service portion of Route 10, from Eleventh East and Twenty-First South, south along Eleventh East and Highland Drive to Twenty-Seventh South, and to remove the tracks south of Twenty-First South. Utah State Road Commission planned to improve Twenty-First South from State Street east to Eleventh East. (Utah PSC Case 2281)

May 1, 1940
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to remove streetcar tracks from Fifth South from Thirteenth East to University of Utah stadium.

May 1, 1940
Utah Light & Traction Company petitioned the Utah Public Utilities Commission to discontinue streetcar service and remove tracks, poles and overhead wires from the following routes:

September 10, 1940
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to change Route 18 and Route 19 from streetcar service to electric trolley coach service.

November 1940
In Case 2426 (no date, circa November 1940) the Public Utilities Commission heard the dispute between Airways Motor Coach Lines and Utah Light & Traction Company over routing of each company's buses along Twenty-First East in the vicinity of Twenty-First South. Airways was operating a bus route from downtown Salt Lake City south along State Street to Twenty-First South, then east along Twenty-First South to Twenty-First East, then south along Twenty-First East to Thirty-Third South, then east along Thirty-Third South to Twenty-Third East, then south along Twenty-Third East to Holladay-Cottonwood. (Utah PSC Case 2426)

March 20, 1941
Utah Light & Traction Company received Utah Public Utilities Commission approval to discontinue streetcar service on the last streetcar route. (Utah PSC Case 2449)

Utah Light & Traction had a total of 27 routes, all operated by gasoline buses, except as follows.

Also to remove tracks, poles and overhead wires from the following already abandoned routes:

Last Streetcar

May 1941
The last run of the last remaining streetcar route was planned, including a photograph that is on file with Utah State Historical Society.

Due to the increasing war effort during the spring and summer of 1941, and with America's entry into the war in December 1941, the last streetcar operation was not until August 1945. At that time, after a cloudburst on August 19th that washed out parts of the last track along Thirteenth East, and with only one route and eight streetcars, Salt Lake City's streetcar operations came to an end. More research is needed to further document this event.

October 7, 1942
Utah Light & Traction Company petitioned the Utah Public Utilities Commission for permission to expand its sole remaining streetcar line, Route 5, serving East First South and Thirteenth East streets. The petition was in response to a recent order of the Office of Defense Transportation (ODT) requesting full use of street railway lines. The expansion of streetar service, replacing paralleling bus routes used during off-peak hours, would allow two bus routes to be shortened and connecting with the streetcar route at Ninth South and Thirteenth East, releasing two buses for use elsewhere, saving 120,000 bus-miles. Additional street cars would be put into service along the route, with three connecting buses to be operated from Ninth South and Thirteenth East, along Thirteenth East, along Ninth South to Nineteenth East, and along Ninth South to Twentry-first East, all terminating at Twenty-first South. Streetcar service was to be expanded from the current hours of 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (Deseret News, October 7, 1942)

October 24, 1942
Streecar service was expanded on Route 5 to run on 15-minute intervals, with connecting buses at East High School running on 30-minute intervals along the three routes to Twenty-first South: Thirteenth East; Ninth South/Nineteenth East; and Ninth South/Twenty-first East. During rush hours, the streetcars would operate on a 5-minute interval. There were eight streetcars available to operate on the new expanded schedule. Due to a shortage of men, the traction company had decided to employ and train women as bus operators. (Deseret News, October 24, 1942)

July 13, 1944
Utah Light & Traction Company sold all of its transportation interests and transferred all of its rights to operate streetcars, electric trolley coaches, and gasoline motor buses to Salt Lake City Lines. Utah Light & Traction retained all of the electrical distribution system, including the overhead power distribution system for the Salt Lake City Lines' streetcars and electric trolley coaches. (Utah PSC Case 2814)

From the agreement between Utah Light & Traction and Salt Lake City Lines:

November 25, 1944
The Public Utilities Commission gave its approval for Utah Power & Light Company to assume the electric power interests of Utah Light & Traction Company. (Utah PSC Case 2814)

In case 2652 (file not examined), the Commission approved the consolidation of Utah Power & Light's and Utah Light & Traction's electric properties.

August 1945
Last street car route removed from service. Regulators had given their approval in March 1941, but the streetcars remained in operation due to World War II.

Salt Lake City Lines

February 27, 1946
Salt Lake City Lines received Public Utilities Commission approval to purchase the stock, equipment, and interests of the Airways Motor Coach Lines.

Airways was incorporated in Wyoming, owned twenty-three buses, and provided all bus service south of Twenty-First South, east of Redwood Road, and west of Wasatch Boulevard to the south line of Salt Lake County. The shops were located at 29 East 900 South, between Main Street and State Street, on Ninth South.

Salt Lake City Lines was engaged in bus and electric coach operation in Salt Lake City. No mention was made in either application or approval of streetcar service.

The purchase price was $125,000.00 with the purchase agreement signed on February 4, 1946. The sale was finalized on March 1, 1946. (Utah PSC Case 2941)

Sources

Initial chronology based on notes taken during a review of "Robert W. Edwards" microfilm at University of Utah library, research completed on October 28-29, 1981.

One major source are the files of the Utah Public Utilities Commission. (Read more about the Utah Public Utilities Commission)

Portions come from newspaper research completed by George Pitchard during the mid 1980s.

Research is on-going; new information is added on a regular basis, with sources cited as needed.

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