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Union Pacific's Heritage Fleet, Diesel Locomotives

This page was last updated on February 9, 2014.

(Return to Union Pacific Heritage Fleet Index Page)

Road
Number
Type
UP 96 SW10
UP 949, 951 E9
UP 963B E9B
UP 6936 DDA40X

EMD/UP SW10 -- 1 unit
1200 horsepower; B-B trucks; 251,200 pounds operating weight

Road
Number
First
Number
Rebuild
Date
Rebuilt
From
Renumber
Date
UP 96 UP 1243 30 Nov 1982 SW7 1821 2 Jan 1998

General Notes:

a. Rebuilt in 1982 by UP Omaha Shops from UP SW7 1821.
b. Assigned to passenger service, as UP 1243, in January 1993 and retained as part of heritage fleet at Cheyenne, Wyoming
   

EMD/VMV E9AM -- 2 units
2000 horsepower; A1A-A1A trucks; 231,600 pounds weight on drivers; 344,200 pounds operating weight

Road
Number
Builder
Date
Builder
Number
UP 949 May 1955 20486
UP 951 Jun 1955 20488

General Notes:

a. UP 949 was originally retired by UP in September 1972 and sold to C&NW, which renumbered it to C&NW 511; sold to METRA, after that agency's takeover of the C&NW Chicago commuter operations; UP acquired the unit (along with an ex UP sleeper) from Kasten Rail Car Services in trade for an ex MP business car "Houston" to have a second E-unit to operate with UP 951 on special passenger trains; arrived at Cheyenne on September 11, 1990.
b. UP 951 was first retired in June 1980; reinstated in February 1984 to stand-in on UP's special trains for steam 4-8-4 844 while that locomotive was on display at the New Orleans World's Fair; both generators damaged during an Operation Lifesaver special, both generators replaced using generators from retired SW7/SW9 units; returned to service in September 1984.
c. UP 949 and 951 were sent to VMV Enterprises, Paducah, Kentucky, in June 1992 to be completely remanufactured; the remanufacture effort included a new 16 cylinder 2000-horsepower EMD 645 engine (replacing the original twin 12-cylinder 1,200-horsepower 567 engines), with an AR10 alternator and a GP38-2 design electrical system, completed in late April 1993.
d. Lettered with "Union Pacific" on the nose until about 2000.
e. SmartStart and cab air conditioning installed during January 2001.
e. The nose doors on both units were welded shut in 2003 to improve grade crossing safety following 6936's grade crossing accident (in late 2000), labels applied saying "No Entrance"; doors and door handles removed in late 2003.
f. Both units received a full repaint by Mid America Car in Kansas City in July 2005.
g. (click here for Read more about UP 949 and 951 in regular service on Union Pacific)
   

EMD/VMV E9BM -- 1 unit
2000 horsepower; A1A-A1A trucks; 231,600 pounds weight on drivers; 344,200 pounds operating weight

Road
Number
First
Number
Second
Number
Third
Number
Fourth
Number
Fifth
Number
Builder
Date
Builder
Number
UP 963B UP 970B Amtrak 468 Amtrak 1919 Amtrak 669 ARR P-7 Oct 1955 20510

General Notes:

a. UP 963B was built as UP 970B; originally retired in June 1972, and leased to Amtrak as 468; sold to Amtrak in November 1973; rebuilt to Amtrak steam generator car 1919, renumbered later to Amtrak 669; sold to Alaska Railroad; sold to Feather River Rail Society, Portola, California; donated back to UP; arrived at Cheyenne in December 1990.
b. UP 963B (as temporarily numbered UP 970B) was sent to VMV Enterprises, Paducah, Kentucky, in June 1992 to be completely remanufactured; the remanufacture effort included a new 16 cylinder 2000-horsepower EMD 645 engine (replacing the original twin 12-cylinder 1200-horsepower 567 engines, removed when it was rebuilt as an unpowered steam generator car for Amtrak in 1975), with an AR10 alternator and a GP38-2 design electrical system; completed in late April 1993.
c. UP 963B was renumbered from UP 970B on 20 April 1993 while being repainted at VMV upon completion of remanufacture; although the unit is the former UP 970B, the frame number was misread by a railfan (frame number 2070-B4 vs. 2072-B4) and the unit was widely reported as being originally UP 963B. The frame number was later verified as being 2072-B4, making the unit UP 970B. Without any conflicting numbers on UP at the time, the new number was retained to both simplfy records, and to avoid additional costs of unnecessary changing of company records.
d. Fully repainted by Mid America Car in Kansas City in July 2005.
   

EMD E9B -- 1 unit
2400 horsepower; A1A-A1A trucks; 232,700 pounds weight on drivers; 340,500 pounds operating weight

Road
Number
First
Number
Second
Number
Third
Number
Fourth
Number
Fifth
Number
Builder
Date
Builder
Number
Date
Retired
UP 966B UP 966B Amtrak 466 Amtrak 1920 Amtrak 670 HODX 670 Jun 1955 20506 30 Apr 1999

General Notes:

a. UP 966B was first retired by UP in June 1972; sold to Amtrak and renumbered 466 in September 1972.
b. Purchased (through trade) by UP in 1994 from Heart of Dixie Chapter (HODX), NRHS, Birmingham, Alabama; stored out of service at Cheyenne.
   

EMD DDA40X -- 1 unit
6600 horsepower; D-D trucks; 557,740 pounds operating weight (as of December 2000)

Road
Number
Builder
Date
Builder
Number
UP 6936 Jan 1971 35510

General Notes:

a. UP 6936 operated in regular freight service from 1971 to mid-1980; stored at Yermo, California, until February 1984; operated in regular freight service, along with 25 other 6900-class locomotives, from March 1984 through May 1985; last operating DDA40X in service on UP, removed from regular freight service on 6 May 1985.
b. Transferred to Heritage Fleet at Cheyenne; first used in excursion service on 24 May 1985.
c. Equipped with D87 traction motors (same as GP40X) in fall of 1990 at Cheyenne, Wyoming
d. Life Extension overhaul completed during late 1994 by UP's Jenks Shops at North Little Rock, Arkansas, including remanufactured electrical equipment and new 645E3B engines; sent to Salt Lake City during January and February 1995 for overhaul of trucks, including rebuilt D87 traction motors (briefly stored at Salt Lake City mounted on SD40-2 trucks while awaiting completion of the overhaul), completed in late February 1995.
e. Wrecked (grade crossing accident) on 30 November 2000 at Vacherie, Louisiana, 20 miles north of New Orleans; repaired and returned to service, with the new winged shield emblem on the nose, completed on 2 May 2001.
f. Built on EMD order number 7198.

Following is a story of how UP 6936 was the one saved, as related to the readers of Trainorders.com by John Bromley on August 26, 2004:

How the 6936 was saved

Whenever I think of the 6936, I think of Bob Sullivan, the man who surprisingly saved it. During the short-lived return of the Centennials in the early 80s after they had been stored for some time, Bob was on the power desk in what we called "Operations Control" in the old Omaha hq building. This was way before the Harriman Dispatching Center was built. I received a lot of railfan calls about them, so I would occasionally call Bob for their whereabouts. He would always bitch about what a bunch of junkers they were and expressed high hopes they would soon return to the deadline where they belonged. Their on-road failures were driving him nuts.

During the Centennial frenzy we agreed to give North Platte railfan Jack Thalkin a ride from North Platte to Cheyenne on the 6922, the unit we planned to donate for display in Cody Park. Jack played a key role in developing railroad displays in North Platte. The 6922 was also noted for the being the unit in the famous "Big Then, Big Now" advertisement showing a Centennial and a Big Boy bursting through a UP shield. The 6922 was also the number of a popular HO model of the Centennials.

I set the ride up for Jack through Bob. We also planned to give a photographer for Video Rails a ride from Cheyenne to Laramie with the same set of power. When Jack and I showed up at the departure yard I was surprised to see not only the 6922 as the leader but two other Centennials as well, trailed by three SD40s on our manifest. Good ol' Bob. If one Centennial was good, three would be even better! Jack was so excited I thought he would run out of tape before we even left Bailey Yard.

On the fast ride west, the dispatcher was trying to pass a hot van train around us, but the van couldn't catch us. Finally the dispatcher told us to slow down so the van could get in front us before we blocked the whole railroad all the way to Cheyenne. Finally I saw the headlight of the van back on track 2 in my mirror. When he got abreast of us, the engineer grabbed the radio and called over, "Jeez, you guys got enough power!?"

Anyway one day after that memorable ride, Bob called me and said he was saving the 6936. It was in the best shape of the bunch left and we had been using it to ferry passenger excursions between Denver and Speer near Cheyenne for Sherman Hill steam excursions. Knowing Bob's opinion of the beasts, I was a little surprised and asked him about it. He seemed almost embarrassed and said, "Gee, we ought to save at least one of them!"

And that's how the 6936 came to fame.

See also this on-line article about UP's Centennial locomotives.

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