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Little Cottonwood Transportation Company
Alta Scenic Railway

This page was last updated on May 23, 2011.

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Locomotives

Gauge: 3-foot narrow gauge.

Road
Number
Builder Builder
Number
Lima
Class
Description Builder
Date
Date To
LCT
Date To
Alta Scenic
Notes
LCT 1 Lima 2194 B 24-2 Class B, 24 Tons, Two-trucks Jul 1909 1916 1925 1, 2
LCT 2 Lima 540 B 50-2 Class B, 50 Tons, Two-trucks Dec 1897 1917 1925 1, 3
LCT 3 Lima 1672 A 20-2 Class A, 20 Tons, Two-trucks Apr 1906 Jul 1917 1925 1, 4
LCT 4 Lima 1673 A 20-2 Class A, 20 Tons, Two-trucks Apr 1906 Nov 1917 1925 1, 5

General Notes:

a. All four locomotives were 2-Truck Shay locomotives, built by Lima.
b. LCT no. 1 was built new for Santa Barbara Tie & Pole Company at Embudo and Hodges, New Mexico; to W. A. Zelnicker Supply Company (dealer), St. Louis, Missouri; to LCT no. 1 in 1916. (drawing in "Chili Line, The Narrow Gauge Trail To Santa Fe" by John A. Gjerre, 1969, page 47, Lima Class 29-2)
c. LCT no. 2 was built new for Colorado & Northwestern no. 25; to Denver Boulder & Western no. 25 in 1909; to Morse Brothers.Machine Company (dealer), Denver, Colorado in 1917; to LCT no. 2 in 1917.
d. LCT no. 3 was built new for Silver City, Pinos Altos & Mogollon no. 3 (also known as Commanche Mining & Smelting); sold in 1913 to W. A. Zenicker Supply Company (dealer), St. Louis, Missouri, moved to Birmingham Rail & Locomotive, Birmingham, Alabama for conversion from 24-inch gauge to 36-inch gauge; shipped to Utah on July 3, 1917. (Plans and photos as SC,PA&M 3 in Model Railroader magazine, May 1971, pages 56-59; see also Railway & Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin no. 57, 1942) (BR&L information from Thomas Lawson letter to Don Strack, August 30, 1980)
e. LCT no. 4 was built new for Silver City, Pinos Altos & Mogollon no. 4 (also known as Commanche Mining & Smelting); sold in 1913 to W. A. Zenicker Supply Company (dealer), St. Louis, Missouri; moved to Birmingham Rail & Locomotive, Birmingham, Alabama for conversion from 24-inch gauge to 36-inch gauge; shipped to Utah on on November 26, 1917. (BR&L information from Thomas Lawson letter to Don Strack, August 30, 1980)
f. Individual locomotive specifications:
  Road
Number
Cylinders Drivers Empty
Weight
  LCT 1 8x8 inches 26-1/2 inches 51,000 pounds
  LCT 2 12x12 inches 32 inches 72,800 pounds
  LCT 3 8x8 inches 26-1/2 inches 40,500 pounds
  LCT 4 8x8 inches 26-1/2 inches 40,400 pounds

Notes:

1. According to Koch's Shay book, all four LCT locomotives passed to Alta Scenic Railway, same numbers.
2.

LCT no. 1 was converted from wood fuel to coal fuel in November 1925 (not on LCT or Alta Scenic at the time); sold to Pioche Pacific Transportation Company no. 3, at Pioche, Nevada, and then to Bristol Mines Company (same location); sold in the 1940s to Robert Caudill; as of 1971 it was on display at either the Last Chance Museum or the Last Frontier Hotel, both in Las Vegas; during the late 1990s, the locomotive was still on display near the Gold Strike Casino (later known as the Hacienda Hotel & Casino) in Boulder City, Nevada; the locomotive was sold to Brad Milne for use on the West Side Narrow Gauge Restoration; moved in November 2003 to Washington state for restoration to become West Side Lumber Company no. 16 and eventual movement to Tuolumne, California for operation.

Photo at Boulder City at Steamlocomotive.info

Photos in 2002 at Trainweb.org/TomFassett

Photos of the move in 2003 to Washington State, at Wsrestoration.com

3. LCT no. 2 was sold back to Morse Brothers (dealer), Denver, Colorado and reportedly scrapped by them in 1925. (see the note for no. 4, below)
4. LCT no. 3 was sold in April 1928 to Utah Iron Ore Corporation no. 3, in Iron Springs (near Cedar City), Utah; possibly changed from 36 inches gauge; numerous parts sold by Lima during time at Utah Iron Ore, between 1928 and 1934; further disposition unknown.
5. LCT no. 4 further disposition unknown after service as Alta Scenic no. 4; Pitchard states that according to local rumor, one of the engines was wrecked on the hill, and that the remains are in the canyon yet. Perhaps it is LCT no. 4. (see a letter and photo in Trains magazine, January 1952, page 48, showing a long-abandoned, wrecked Shay in Little Cottonwood Canyon in 1933; in the accompanying letter, H. S. Johnson, saying that it was LCT no. 2, wrote that it was there at least until 1938, when the county road in the canyon was improved to allow better access to the new Peruvian ski lodge.)

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