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Rio Grande Western Railway (1889-1908)

This page was last updated on June 27, 2016.

(Return to Rio Grande in Utah index page)

(This is a work in progress; research continues.)

Overview

The Rio Grande Western was organized essentially for one purpose, to convert the old D&RGW from narrow gauge to standard gauge. This was accomplished is stages.

Robert G. Athearn described the situation in the late 1880s (Athearn, p. 166):

By 1887 it became apparent to Rio Grande management that unless it offered the bigger roads an efficient and easily made interchange, one or more of them would build across Colorado to seek a western outlet from the Salt Lake region. The Rio Grande held an advantage in the fact that except for the Union Pacific, it was the only road offering service between Denver and Ogden. It could connect the AT&SF [at the east end of its line] with the Central Pacific [at Ogden] and form a link in a new transcontinental system.

The great drawback to the plan was the Rio Grande's narrow gauge tracks.

There was but one answer: to standard gauge the whole mainline.

In Colorado, D&RG did not complete its standard gauge connection, via Tennessee Pass and Glenwood Springs, until mid November 1890, by-passing the original narrow gauge route to the south over Marshall Pass.

On November 17, 1890 the first standard gauge through train from Denver entered Salt Lake City. On November 14, 1890, the D&RG in Colorado had completed its 63-mile connection between Rifle and Grand Junction. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 18, 1890; Athearn, pp. 134-173)

Between July 12, 1889 and mid 1901, the Rio Grande Western was independent of the Denver & Rio Grande. (Wilson, p. 95)

Timeline

LeMassena summarizes 1889 for the RGW on page 89:

March 16, 1889
Bases for standard gauge rails being put into D&RGW's Salt Lake City roundhouse. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 16, 1889)

May 1889
D&RGW completed laying rails to allow both narrow gauge and standard gauge locomotives to be repaired in Salt Lake roundhouse, using four rails (narrow gauge inside of the standard gauge rails). (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 16, 1889) Project was begun in March. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 16, 1889)

May 16, 1889
D&RGW roundhouse now has narrow and standard gauge tracks, four-rail type. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 16, 1889)

On May 16, 1889 the Rio Grande Western Railway was incorporated as a reorganization of D&RGW to finance the conversion of the 395 miles in Utah from narrow gauge to standard gauge. (Utah corporation, index number 565)

June 24, 1889
Rio Grande Western Railway was incorporated to finance conversion of the D&RGW to standard gauge. The company was formally organized on May 16, 1889, and was a consolidation of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railway, in Utah, and the State Line & Denver Railway, in Colorado. The State Line & Denver was organized by Palmer as a connection between the D&RGW at State Line and the soon-to-be-completed Colorado Midland at Glenwood Springs. (Utah corporation index 565; LeMassena, p. 89) The reorganization took place on July 1, 1889, using the name Rio Grande Western Railway instead of the planned Utah & Colorado Railway. (Wilson, pp. 93, 94)

July 6, 1889
Dodge says Denver & Rio Grande Western name changed to Rio Grande Western on June 20, 1889. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 6, 1889)

September 24, 1889
The old 45 pound steel rail from the SLC-Ogden line being laid as standard gauge the Bingham line. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 24, 1889)

October 4, 1889
RGW received its first standard gauge locomotives. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 5, 1889)

October 5, 1889
Four new standard gauge freight engines for Rio Grande Western arrived yesterday morning in Ogden. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 5, 1889)

October 11, 1889
The four new engines, numbers 111, 112, 113 and 114, were brought to Salt Lake City by Southern Pacific engine 248 yesterday, arriving at about 5:30pm. Engines are reported to have cost $8,500.00 each. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 11, 1889)

October 13, 1889
No. 111 run out yesterday just before noon, on 98 pounds pressure; it will take the northbound freight today. No. 112 will run out tomorrow. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 13, 1889)

October 15, 1889
No. 112 out yesterday, 114 today, and the 113 tomorrow. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 15, 1889)

October 15, 1889
RGW passenger train No. 8 blown over a quarter mile north of Farmington tank, morning of 13th; an 11 car train, including the buffet-sleeper Provo. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 15, 1889)

October 17, 1889
Engines 115, 116, 117 and 118 towed down from Ogden yesterday afternoon. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 17, 1889)

October 18, 1889
Engines 119 and 120 arrived in Ogden yesterday afternoon. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 18, 1889)

October 20, 1889
Engine 121 has arrived - last of the first group. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 20, 1889)

November 1, 1889
Name of the Baldwin engineer who brought out the RGW engines was one P. J. Cutler, who left last evening for the east. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 1, 1889)

November 5, 1889
Engines 33 and 34 arrived Sunday evening 3rd from New York Locomotive Works, Rome, New York. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 5, 1889)

November 7, 1889
Engine 33 ran a trial trip to Ogden and return on Monday, the 4th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 7, 1889)

November 14, 1889
Engines 35 and 36 arrived in Salt Lake on the 12th; 37 and 38 are now in Ogden, to be brought down. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 14, 1889)

November 20, 1889
RGW passenger depot in Salt Lake is to be moved. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 20, 1889)

November 23, 1889
The RGW has 24 standard gauge engines; narrow gauge engines 107 and 108 are in the shops for overhaul. The editor of the paper suggests to folks that they go out west of the D&RGW shops and "...compare the old Jordan and Salt Lake RR machines ... built by Porter, Bell & Co., and the National Locomotive Works years ago,..." with the huge new RGW engines alongside. He further says the old narrow gauge engines are "...fit only for the scrap-heap." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 23, 1889)

November 26, 1889
The depot has been moved, and is now being set on new foundations. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 26, 1889)

November 27, 1889
RGW building a new roundhouse, and so forth, at a site four miles below Castle Gate, for 'helpers'. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 27, 1889)

November 28, 1889
The Rio Grande Western depot, having been moved halfway across the block recently, was placed in position on its new foundation yesterday afternoon. (Salt Lake Herald, November 28, 1889)

December 1889
Prior to being converted from narrow gauge to standard gauge, the D&RG line between Crevasse and Grand Junction (17 miles) was leased to RGW for ease of operation,  to allow Grand Junction to serve as a more efficient connection between the two now-independent lines. (LeMassena, p. 89) The earlier State Line & Denver had been organized for this exact purpose, to build a line from State Line to Grand Junction, and to continue on to Glenwood Springs and a connection with the projected Colorado Midland.

The line between Salt Lake City and Provo was still narrow gauge during mid December 1889, without provision for standard gauge equipment. Standard gauge engines were being shipped from Salt Lake City to Provo over the standard gauge OSL&UN (UP). (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 15, 1889)

When the new standard gauge line was completed between Whitehouse and Crevasse in 1890, it was completed by the Rio Grande Western Railway, which was the reorganized D&RGW. The 17 miles of line from Crevasse to Grand Junction was converted from narrow gauge to standard gauge by D&RG, then leased to RGW for operation in December 1889. Crevasse then became the new junction point, and legal point of separation, between D&RG and RGW, as opposed to the old junction point at State Line on the old narrow gauge line. (LeMassena, p. 89)

December 5, 1889
Four new baggage cars for RGW arrived yesterday in Salt Lake City, and the rest of the rolling stock is on the way. (Salt Lake Herald, December 5, 1889)

December 7, 1889
New RGW coaches 201-204 arrived at Salt Lake; built by St. Charles. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 7, 1889)

December 8, 1889
Two new 65-foot turntables have been received, for Salt Lake City and for Pleasant Valley Junction. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 8, 1889)

December 12, 1889
More of the new passenger equipment has arrived, being baggage & mail cars 1 and 2, and baggage cars 51 through 58, also St. Charles build. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 12, 1889)

December 15, 1889
Another reference to the old Jordan Valley engines presently sitting dead on the west side of the shops, near the wye. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 15, 1889)

December 15, 1889
RGW engines 111-114 have been shipped to Provo over the Union Pacific, for use on the new standard gauge line east of Provo to Castle Gate. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 15, 1889)

December 21, 1889
An item on RGW improvements, among other things says "The depot has just received the first coat of green paint, and the remodeling of the interior is in progress. The addition to the freight depot has been commenced,..." (Salt Lake Herald, December 21, 1889)

1890
The original narrow gauge line between Whitehouse in Utah and Crevasse in Colorado, was removed in 1890. (LeMassena, p. 91)

1890
RGW converted the one-mile Diamond Quarry Spur from narrow gauge to standard gauge, from Diamond Junction to Diamond Quarry. (LeMassena, p. 91) Diamond Quarry was a stone quarry at the mouth of Diamond Creek, just west of Thistle. The spur was completed in 1887. (LeMassena, p. 87)

January 2, 1890
Paper says there are no more narrow gauge engines in service between Provo and Pleasant Valley Junction. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 2, 1890)

January 7, 1890
RGW engines 131-135 have been received and put together; there is now 25 of them on the line. Passenger engines 39-42 expected soon; yesterday four mail cars and six second class coaches received. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 7, 1890)

January 7, 1890
Four narrow gauge engines in shop being overhauled. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 7, 1890)

January 12, 1890
The building to the south of the RGW depot, by 100 feet, is nearly completed, and will be used for freight, baggage, express, etc. (Salt Lake Herald, January 12, 1890)

January 21, 1890
U.P. has borrowed five or six RGW engines to be used on line between Silver Bow and Pocatello during the current snow trouble. They left Ogden on morning of 21st, to go to Pocatello via Granger. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 21, 1890)

March 2, 1890
The RGW has gotten back from the D&RG its engines 37 and 38. "Engine No. 7. the switch 'dinkie', is in the hospital and looks better prepared for the scrap heap than for any further service." Narrow gauge engines 72, 785 (sic) and 105 are in the shop being overhauled. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 2, 1890)

March 6, 1890
RGW line from Salt Lake City to Ogden was changed to standard gauge. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 8, 1890)

March 8, 1890
The new standard gauge line between Salt Lake City and Ogden was completed on the 6th, and regular trains began running yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 8, 1890)

March 10, 1890
RGW line between Pleasant Valley Junction and Winter Quarters mine was changed to standard gauge. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 11, 1890; LeMassena, p. 91)

March 11, 1890
Standard gauge line finished into Winter Quarters coal mines, and they now load into standard gauge cars. (ed. note: Is the entire line between Salt Lake City and Winter Quarters now all standard gauge?) (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 11, 1890)

March 13, 1890
"The Rio Grande Western is rebuilding four of its narrow gauge engines for broad gauge service between P. V. Junction the coal mines. No. 108 is the first engine to be turned out thus, and she looks first rate,... No. 110 is now in the erecting shop undergoing the transfer..." No's 78 and 101 are being repaired for local narrow gauge service, and dinkie No. 7 is going to Scofield as a stationary boiler. standard gauge engines 51 and 52 are in Salt Lake, and 53 & 54 in Ogden, to come down. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 13, 1890)

April 16, 1890
"The new coaches of the Rio Grande are running. An entire train, together with a new engine, was photographed at the depot yesterday." (Salt Lake Evening Times, April 16, 1890)

April 16, 1890
"The new day coaches recently brought to Salt Lake by the Rio Grande Western, and which will soon be placed upon the road, are attracting no little attention in railway circles. Yesterday the chief of photographers, Savage, accompanied by Mr. Bennett and Mr. Wolcott, visited the Rio Grande depot, where a special train of five of the new coaches; baggage, mail and express cars; and a new and powerful passenger locomotive, No. 54, had been made up for the purpose of getting a photograph of it. The train, indeed, was a handsome one, and one can readily understand why the railway people should desire photographs of it. The train was backed up in front of the passenger station and the new quarters now being prepared for the auditor and his force, and several very excellent negatives were obtained, which will shortly be put to good use." (Salt Lake Herald, April 16, 1890)

April 22, 1890
Entire class, RGW engines 100-110, to be made standard gauge. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 22, 1890)

April 22, 1890
"Engines 100 to 110 on the Rio Grande are being altered to standard. gauge." (Salt Lake Evening Times, April 22, 1890)

April 23, 1890
A private car for RGW arrived Sunday 20th at Denver, from St. Charles. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 23, 1890)

May 1, 1890
Large photo of RGW depot and train is being sent out to various points. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 1, 1890)

May 8, 1890
Brief mention of RGW car 'A'. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 8, 1890)

May 15, 1890
RGW engine 73 (narrow gauge) tipped over at Bingham, the result of water from a nearby ditch softening the roadbed. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 15, 1890)

May 25, 1890
Four RGW narrow gauge engines now in shop being widened; next three to come is will be widened also. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 25, 1890)

May 27, 1890
Two RGW engines considerably smashed on Soldier Summit last evening. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 27, 1890)

June 1, 1890
Standard gauge to Bingham supposed to be done today. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 1, 1890)

June 2, 1890
RGW operated first standard gauge train into Bingham. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 3, 1890)

(LeMassena, on page 91, says that in 1890, both the Bingham Branch, from Bingham Junction to Bingham (16 miles), and the Wasatch Branch, from Bingham Junction to Wasatch (8 miles) were converted from narrow gauge to standard gauge, with service between Wasatch and Alta being intermittent by way of a narrow gauge tramway.)

June 3, 1890
First regular standard gauge train to Bingham went up yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 3, 1890)

June 3, 1890
Item on the RGW line out of Thistle into San Pete County. (The Home Sentinel, Manti, June 3, 1890)

June 7, 1890
Bancroft to be out on the line in his car 'Trinidad' when the standard gauge line is completed on the 10th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 7, 1890)

June 9, 1890
Rio Grande Western standard gauge passenger cars at present: eight baggage, eight mail and express, four combines and 16 coaches, apparently all from St. Charles Car Company. (Salt Lake Evening Times, June 9, 1890)

New RGW Timetable in effect 12:01am, 10 June 1890, for initial standard gauge service on the RGW. (Salt Lake Evening Times, June 9, 1890)

June 10, 1890
RGW completed conversion of tracks to standard gauge, between Ogden and Grand Junction. (Johnson, p. 62; Wilson, p. 94; LeMassena, p. 89)

(A description of the new standard gauge route, as published in The Railroad Gazette, January 10, 1890, and November 21, 1890)

late June 1890
W. H. Bancroft resigned as general manager of Rio Grande Western, "a surprise to everyone". Effective July 1, 1890. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 21, 1890) Bancroft returned to Salt Lake City from Denver, to find a letter from D. C. Dodge saying that Bancroft's letter of resignation would be accepted. Bancroft announced that he would leave on July 1, 1890. (Salt Lake Evening Times, June 21, 1890)

(Athearn says on page 147 that Bancroft had been with the D&RG since 1881, and later became Superintendent of the Oregon Short Line.)

(Read more about W. H. Bancroft, one of the most importment men in the history of Utah railroads)

June 19, 1890
RGW engines 104, 105, 106, 107 and 109 to be standard gauge soon; there are a dozen dead narrow gauge engines sitting west of the roundhouse, most of which are to be used on the Sevier valley line. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 19, 1890)

July 4, 1890
"R.G.W. narrow gauge engines 30 and 31 were secured yesterday afternoon by the Union Pacific for use today on the Garfield Beach line." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 4, 1890)

July 10, 1890
The two engines recently wrecked on Soldier Summit (see item for May 27th) are now in the shop for repairs. Two narrow gauge freight engines are being widened to standard gauge. The door openings on four stalls of the roundhouse at Salt Lake City are being widened by four inches and made taller by eight inches, to allow standard gauge cars to pass in for repairs. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 10, 1890)

July 24, 1890
RGW office car 'A' is regularly kept in Salt Lake for Superintendent Welby. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 24, 1890)

August 7, 1890
The old narrow gauge turntable from Salt Lake has had one foot added on each end, and will be installed at Bingham. Engine widening continues. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 7, 1890)

September 18, 1890
"R. R. Doings." "The following circular, which was forwarded to Henry Beal, Esq., of Ephraim."

"Salt Lake City, Sept. 12th 1890

"Sealed proposals will be received by the Rio Grande Western Railway Co., for thirty thousand red pine and black balsam ties, 7"x 7" x 8 feet long to be delivered on the line of the Sevier Valley branch between Manti and Christianburg on or before Jan. 1st 1891. At least half the ties must be green timber and peeled, the remainder may if desired be of fire-killed timber if sound and suitable ties. Contractors are required to name separate prices for green timber and for fire-killed timber.

"Bids for less than 30,000 will not be received and all bids will be closed September 20th.

"The Company reserve the right to accept or reject any bid. Contractors will be placed under forfeit of $50.00 per day for each and every day after Jan. 1st, 1891, that the whole or any part of the number contracted for remain undelivered.

"Ties will be inspected and received monthly; from the price thereof 20 per cent. will be retained as a guarantee until contract is completed. After signing of Contract the Company will receive ties from the Contractor only on this portion of their line until expiration of Contract." "E. J. Yard, Res. Engr." (The Ephraim County Register, September 18, 1890)

September 28, 1890
RGW 34 blew out a boiler check, draining the boiler; 35 to the rescue; at Wood's Cross. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 28, 1890)

October 3, 1890
Rebuilding of RGW 127 to be done this week. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 3, 1890)

October 22, 1890
The 'depot' at Bingham has been old narrow gauge carbodies ever since standard gauge was put in. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 22, 1890)

October 23, 1890
RGW 102 ran over and killed someone at Thistle yesterday. "Making the Engines Over" "Narrow Gauge engines 106, 107, 108, 109 and 110 have all been made over into standard gauge engines, and 30, 104 and 105 will be shortly. No. 30 is to be used for special passenger service, such as hauling officials over the road, and the like." No. 137 will be out soon, and engines 78 and 103 being repaired for Sevier Valley line service. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 23, 1890)

November 8, 1890
The reason for no new depot at Bingham is that the RGW cannot get land at a reasonable price, everyone wanting to gouge the railroad company. The waiting room at Bingham is 'reported as being an old narrow gauge boxcar body; new depots are being built at Castle Gate and P. V. Junction. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 8, 1890)

November 14, 1890
Through service on the standard gauge line Denver to Ogden about to begin. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 14, 1890)

November 17, 1890
First standard gauge through train from Denver arrived in Salt Lake City. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 18, 1890)

November 18, 1890
The first through passenger train arrived Monday evening the 17th, with engine 34 that had been put on at Green River; arrived three hours late! (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 18, 1890)

November 21, 1890
Car 'Nomad' now being built for the RGW; will cost $20,000.00. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 21, 1890)

December 2, 1890
Two sleepers arrived in Denver yesterday for standard gauge service, and six more are expected today. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 2, 1890)

December 10, 1890
Engines 22 and 78 are being repaired for service on the Sevier branch. No. 30 'is having her legs spread for running on the standard gauge.' (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 10, 1890)

December 13, 1890
RGW's narrow gauge line south from Thistle to Ephraim was completed. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 13, 1890)

(LeMassena, on page 89, says that this line was between Thistle and Manti.)

December 13, 1890
The R.G.W. line to Ephraim (Sevier Valley branch) opens today. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 13, 1890)

December 15, 1890
There will be a new depot at Bingham soon, to replace the two old narrow gauge boxcars now used for that purpose. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 15, 1890)

December 28, 1890
"Engine 31 of the Rio Grande Western has been repaired and is ready for service on the Sevier Valley Branch. Its mate, No. 30, will be made over into a standard gauge sister within the next three weeks, unless certain forgings sent for from Philadelphia are further delayed." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 28, 1890)

December 30, 1890
"Railroad Rumbles" "The Rio Grande Western Railway opens its new branch to Manti January 1st for passenger and freight traffic." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 30, 1890)

1891
RGW extended the narrow-gauge, mule-powered tramway in Bingham Canyon two miles, from Bingham to Upper Bingham. (LeMassena, p. 92)

January 1, 1891
Twelve RGW engines were widened in 1890. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 1, 1891)

January 4, 1891
Narrow gauge engine 73 is on the Sevier branch; engine 117 has plow attached; and flanger #3 has been finished. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 4, 1891)

January 23, 1891
Narrow gauge engines 21, 22, 71 and 72 are on the Sevier line; No. 120 was wrecked on Soldier the other day; No. 70 is repaired and about to be run out; No.51 is having her stack painted red, in honor of pulling Palmer's special. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 23, 1891)

January 24, 1891
"Four new passenger engines are due at the Rio Grande Western roundhouse January 27th from New York locomotive works at Rome, N. Y." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 24, 1891)

"The Rio Grande Western yesterday began tearing up the third rail between this city and Ogden. This leaves a third rail only between Salt Lake and Thistle, which will remain for some years yet." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 24, 1891)

January 30, 1891
RGW No. 108 is switcher at Grand Junction; 30 and 120 in the shops; and 35 now has red stack, too. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 30, 1891)

February 3, 1891
Brief item on the car 'Nomad,' which comments that the upholstery is in shades of blue and gray, appropriate for a Civil War veteran. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 3, 1891)

February 12, 1891
RGW received engines 55 and 56 yesterday; others being set up at Burnham, and will be run through on a train. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 12, 1891)

February 15, 1891
Rio Grande Western engines 55 and 56, built by Rome and just received, are being renumbered to 39 and 40, as they are of the 30 class and not of the 50 class. Engines 115 and 120 are in for repairs, the result of wrecks. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 15, 1891)

February 15, 1891
The narrow gauge rail will soon be removed from those areas where yet it remains on the R.G.W. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 15, 1891)

February 19, 1891
RGW gets two 'baby' locomotives, received at Denver and run to Utah. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 19, 1891)

February 22, 1891
Standard gauge third rail being laid on the Utah Central to various suburban points, to accommodate the RGW. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 22, 1891)

March 2, 1891
RGW engines 41 and 42.received and in service; Rome built engines. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 2, 1891)

March 29, 1891
"Hog" engines 136, 137 and 138 have been received from Baldwin. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 29, 1891)

April 1891
RGW's Sevier Branch between Thistle and Manti was still narrow gauge. Narrow gauge equipment was being shipped to Thistle from other parts of the system. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 30, 1891)

April 7, 1891
RGW engines 139 and 140 received from Baldwin at Burnham, now being set up, and will be run through to Utah on trains. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 7, 1891)

April 12, 1891
Engines 140 and 141 have arrived from Denver. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 12, 1891)

April 30, 1891
As the narrow gauge rail is at least partly removed between Thistle and Salt Lake City, all remaining narrow gauge cars at SLC will be moved to Thistle on flat cars. There are at present nine engines on the Sevier line. No. 105 is out and ready for work, and 70 and 75 likewise being repaired for the Sevier line; all three will be taken down on flat cars. Engine 114 is in for repairs, and then 121 and 37. "The small engines like No's 6 and 9 will shortly decorate the scrap heap." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 30, 1891)

May 1891
Construction of the extension of the Sevier Branch south of Manti reached 15 miles south of Manti and graders were at work all the way to Salina. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 9, 1891)

May 6, 1891
Sevier Railway was incorporated by RGW interests to build from Manti, and a connection with the RGW from Thistle, south to Parowan by way of Salina and Marysvale, with branches to the gypsum beds near Salina, to the Clear Creek coal lands west of Marysvale, and east up Salina Canyon, through Castle Valley, to a connection with the RGW near Green River Station. (Utah corporation index 909, 4355)

May 8, 1891
"Alta News." (extract) "The tramway is expected to be operating in about two weeks. The Rio Grande western is broadening the gauge from Bingham Junction to Wasatch, and will have the work done within the next two weeks. It is now completed two miles east of Sandy." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 8, 1891)

May 9, 1891
RGW narrow gauge track is 15 miles south of Manti, and graders are at work all the way to Salina. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 9, 1891)

May 11, 1891
Tintic Range Railway was incorporated by RGW interests to build from Spanish Fork or Provo, or some point between, to the Tintic Mining District. (Utah corporation index 910, 4354; Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 12, 1891)

May 12, 1891
Articles of incorporation for Tintic Range Railway filed yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 12, 1891)

May 17, 1891
"Ore Coming from Alta." "It will probably be two weeks yet before the R. G. W. company get their track broad gauged and ready to operate between Bingham Junction and Wasatch. They are laying thirty-pound steel on this road and have it down about five and a half miles from Bingham Junction." "J. W. King, who has been the tramway agent at Alta the past eight years,..." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 17, 1891)

May 17, 1891
RGW 52 is in for repairs and overhaul. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 17, 1891)

May 21, 1891
The RGW is burning old narrow gauge boxcars to salvage their iron scrap. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 21, 1891)

May 28, 1891
RGW 114 in for overhaul, also; and still two narrow gauge engines being widened out. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 28, 1891)

June 1891
Wasatch Branch, formerly the Wasatch & Jordan Valley, was changed to standard gauge. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 10, 1891)

June 2, 1891
"The Rio Grande Western announce the completion of the broad-gauging of their branch line from Sandy to Wasatch, and hereafter no freight destined to points on the branch need be transferred at Sandy." (Salt Lake Daily Herald, June 2, 1891)

June 3, 1891
An advertisement item, on the RGW Alta Branch, "...which has now been made broad gauge,..." "At Wasatch tramway connection is made for Alta." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 3, 1891)

June 4, 1891
An R. G. W. advertisement: "Open to Sandy and Wasatch." "In effect June 1, the Alta Branch of the Rio Grande Western, which has now been broad gauged, will be opened for freight and passenger traffic to Sandy and Wasatch." "At Wasatch direct tramway connection is made for Alta." This appears over the names of J. H. Bennett, General Freight and Passenger Agent, and A. E. Welby, Superintendent. (Salt Lake Daily Herald, June 4, 1891)

June 9, 1891
Supt. Welby received his car 'B' yesterday; car 'A' will now be used by other officers of the road when needed. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 9, 1891)

June 10, 1891
RGW has completed standard gauge line to Wasatch from Bingham Junction. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 10, 1891)

June 11, 1891
A letter to the editor shows RGW engine No. 108 on the run to Wasatch. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 11, 1891)

June 22, 1891
The Sevier Valley branch of the RGW will be widened soon. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 22, 1891)

July 1, 1891
The Sevier Vallley line of Rio Grande Western was to be "broadened" on July 15, 1891. (Salt Lake Journal of Commerce, July 1, 1891, Volume 4, Number 24)

July 10, 1891
All narrow gauge cars on the Sevier branch to be unloaded by the 14th so that they can be moved to Thistle on the evening of the 14th. The track to be widened on the 15th, and the line reopened as a standard gauge on the 16th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 10, 1891)

July 14, 1891
"The R. G. W. Railway will change the gauge of track on the San Pete and Sevier branches July 15th from narrow to standard. Work will begin at 5 a.m. Each foreman will have four miles of track to change and will have 24 men under his direction." (The Ephraim County Register, July 14, 1891)

July 14, 1891
"Will Not Run" "To All Agents: on account of changing the Sanpete Division and Sevier Valley Railway from narrow to standard gauge, there will be no regular trains operated on these lines in either direction on July 15th, and you will not sell any tickets or check any baggage to, from or between any points south of Thistle Junction or north of Salina, inclusive, upon that date.

"Neither will you receive for shipment any live stock, perishable or fast time freight shipments which, according to our regular schedules, should pass over this branch upon July 15th.

"Please post two copies of this notice conspicuously in your station, and acknowledge upon the attached receipt." /signed/ J. H. Bennett, G. F. & P. A., R. G. W." (The Home Sentinel, Manti, July 14, 1891)

July 15, 1891
The San Pete Division, between Thistle and Manti was changed to standard gauge on a single day. (Poor's, 1892, p. 543)

July 16, 1891
Sevier Branch from Manti to Salina was changed to standard gauge on a single day. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 16, 1891)

July 19, 1891
"The remaining narrow gauge engines will be broadened as soon as possible. No. 104 is just out of the shop thus remodeled, and looked first rate. She went to Thistle yesterday afternoon." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 19, 1891)

August 7, 1891
RGW laying 58 pound steel rail on the Tintic branch. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 7, 1891)

August 9, 1891
Three new freight engines received from Baldwin at Burnham, for RGW. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 9, 1891)

August 16, 1891
Engines 144-148 received by RGW at Grand Junction yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 16, 1891)

August 17, 1891
Sevier Branch reached Salina. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 18, 1891)

(Poor's 1896 report, p. 329, says that the Sevier Railway completed the 25.7 miles between Manti and Salina in July 1891.)

(Wilson, p. 97, says that the "Sevier Valley Railway" was completed from Manti to Salina in 1891.)

(LeMassena, p. 92, says Sevier Railway was built between Manti and Salina (26 miles), as standard gauge, in 1891.)

August 18, 1891
Opening of the Sevier Branch, to Salina, yesterday, by special excursion. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 18, 1891)

August 19, 1891
RGW engine 39 pulled special excursion to Salina out of Salt Lake City, but at Thistle was traded for two of the best ex-narrow gauge engines; "Up the road from Thistle are large quantities of narrow gauge cars of all kinds stored on sidings, good, bad and indifferent, and what to do with them is at present a problem. The road would like to sell them, and probably the Rio Grande Southern and the Utah Central will take many of these cars." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 19, 1891)

August 20, 1891
Superintendent Welby's car is the "B". (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 20, 1891)

August 25, 1891
David H. Moffat resigned as president of D&RG over foreign bondholder's displeasure with Denver management of company. (Athearn, p. 175) Replaced by Edward T. Jeffery. (Athearn, p. 176)

(LeMassena, page 67, says that the costs of completion of the standard gauge route, along with D&RG's financing of the Rio Grande Southern in southwest Colorado, forced D&RG to not pay a dividend in 1891, angering the bond holders against Moffat's plans for the railroad, and he resigned because of it.)

September 5, 1891
"Narrow gauge engines 75 and 103 are being made over into the standard gauge at the Rio Grande Western shops. Passenger engines 34 and 36 and freight engine 134 are being repaired." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 5, 1891)

September 10, 1891
Tintic Range Railway completed to Payson. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 11, 1891) Being laid with 58-pound rail. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 7, 1891)

(Wilson, p. 97, says that the Tintic Range Railway was completed from Springville to Eureka in 1891.)

(LeMassena, p. 92, says Tintic Range Railway built from Springville to Eureka, as standard gauge, in 1891.)

September 11, 1891
Tintic Range Railway completed to Payson yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 11, 1891)

September 17, 1891
D. W. Brunton, of Taylor & Brunton sampling works, is in town; his company is to put up new works below the Germania smelter, the building to be 40 by 127 feet, the central part being 40 feet square and three stories high, and it will be located between the R. G. W. and U. P. tracks. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 17, 1891)

September 23, 1891
"Coach A, Colonel Dodge's car, is being overhauled and the kitchen . remodeled. The intelligent designer had placed the range and the refrigerator together like Siamese twins, so that the heat played the 'old scratch' with the contents of the refrigerator. The Colonel has-got tired of this and sighs for a change which is being effected." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 23, 1891)

September 23, 1891
"Making Over Engines" "Narrow gauge engines 75 and 103 are being made over into the standard gauge in the R. G. W." Mechanic Dailey "...has also cleaned up the yard of old narrow gauge engines and other truck,..." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 23, 1891)

September 23, 1891
"Foreman Langston of the car shops went to Thistle yesterday to inventory the narrow-gauge stock in store down there, and get a revelation as to what he shall do with it." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 23, 1891)

October 11, 1891
"The Oregon Lumber Company has bought 20 narrow gauge flats from the Thistle yards for use on their logging railroad up in Oregon. The Rio Grande Western is selling off the remains of its narrow gauge equipment as fast as possible. The Utah Central is after some of the narrow gauge engines and cars." The sale of 1,000 tons of 40 pound steel rails, and 88 narrow gauge freight and flat cars, which was to have been yesterday the 10th, has been postponed, at the request of the Utah Central, consignee of the lot. Said sale was because the U.C. owes the freight charges and at this point, six months storage: $19,666.82 on the rail, and $15,259.37 on the cars. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 11, 1891)

October 11, 1891
RGW engine 36 to come out of shop tomorrow, and the 35 soon. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 11, 1891)

November 1891
The tracks of Rio Grande Western in Springville were moved from their alignment along Springville's Main Street, to a new alignment four blocks west. (Ogden Standard, November 8, 1891, "accomplished the other day")

November 10, 1891
"The Rio Grande Southern has bought all of the Western's narrow gauge rolling stock except the small amount that is to be set on standard trucks for service on the branches. This is a great relief to the Western, and the long encumbered yards at Thistle are now being cleared out. The stock is loaded on flats and hauled to Grand Junction, where it is transferred to the Denver & Rio Grande narrow gauge. Thus disappears the last vestige of the narrow gauge that for so long ran into this city from Denver. Everything is broad gauge nowadays." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 10, 1891)

November 13, 1891
Item on the sale of John W. Young's rail and cars, a copy of which item is provided here (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, 13 November 1891):

RUMBLES OF THE RAILROADS

Sale of Stored Material - Note and Personal Mention.

The Rio Grande Western held the long expected sale at its yards yesterday of the rails and cars consigned to John W. Young, and on which he has never been able to pay the charges for freight and storage. The itemized property is as follows:

One thousand one and a half tons of steel railroad rails weight forty pounds to the yard, and consigned by the New York Equipment Company from Scranton, Pa., to J. W. Young at Salt Lake City, Utah; also eighty-eight narrow gauge railroad freight cars, consigned by the New York Equipment Company from Canton, O. to J. W. Young at Salt Lake City, Utah. Said property has been held at the place to which it was consigned and transported by said railway company for over six months and has not been accepted or taken away by tie consignee, and will be sold to satisfy the carriers' lieu. The rails will be sold by the ton to an amount sufficient to pay freight and charges for storage and care to the amount of $19,008.82 besides costs of sale.

A sufficient number of cars will be sold to pay freight and charges of storage and care to the amount of .$15,259.97, besides costs of sale.

Station Agent J. H. Riley conducted the sale, and mounting a pile of rails announced in a fine contralto voice that he; was ready for bidders. There were half a dozen of these, and first some one offered to take the 1001 tons for $20,112 the blanket price. Then another party thought he would take 1000 tons; and he was followed by others who would give the $20,112 for 950 tons, and so on down the scale until James P. Woodman and Simon Bamberger offered the sum for 785 tons, and beneath this no one would go. So the 785 tons were knocked down to the successful bidders, leaving the remaining 210 tons subject to attaching creditors, and to be sold out for their benefit "at some future time not hereinbefore mentioned."

The amount of indebtedness of John W., Young to the attaching creditors is said to be $30,000, and just how far 210 tons of rails will go in satisfying all these judgments can be easily figured out. The rails are forty pounds steel, and at the price bid, cost Messrs Woodman and Bamberger a little over $25.50 per ton.

The eighty-eight gondola care were next put up, metaphorically speaking, for they remained on the rails. Auctioneer Riley's voice at this juncture was so sweet and seductive that Right of Way Agent S. H. Babcock of the Rio Grande Western was almost moved to tears, and in a husky voice, in a moment of forgetfulness, exclaimed that he would rake in the whole lot at $25 per-car, or $2200. This left the Railway Company $13,000 in the broth, but the cars were sold for that figure. Mr. Bamberger stood ready to take the cars at $5 each, but did not have any show. The cars were worth perhaps $150 each, and- the man who sold them to John W. Young had painted the old things all up, and made them look very slick. He doubtless thought for the time that he had made a nice thing out of it, but he has learned by this time how futile are the hopes of this world, 'Pillars of earthly pride decay,' et cetera.

The Hot Springs road is expected to take the 785 tons of forty pounds steel, and it will give them good service. Someone wishing to create trouble, asked if Agent Riley had secured an auctioneer's license from the city to sell off those goods. If he didn't, the police would be shortly in hot pursuit of the violator of the law. Mr. Babcock is-supposed to have bought the cars for the Rio Grande Southern.

November 14, 1891
"Railroad Material Sold," being the sale of 88 cars and some hundreds of tons of rail, consigned to John W. Young, who has not paid the freight charges thereon. The cars were shipped by the New York Equipment Co., from Canton, Ohio, and as a period of six months has gone by without the payment of the freights, the cars have been sold, to the R. G. W., at $25.00 each. The rail, of 40-pound section, was sold at $27.50 per ton, for 785 tons of it, to Simon Bamberger. (Salt Lake Daily Herald, November 14, 1891)

November 17, 1891
Rio Grande Western engines 38 and 51, freight engine 119, and 'Chippy' 103 are in the shops for repairs and so forth; "No. 103 is being widened out." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 17, 1891)

November 26, 1891
Item referring to the loop west of Goshen as being more scenic than Marshall Pass; also, proposed new timetable as of January 1, 1892 to show service to Tintic district and Eureka. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 26, 1891)

December 1891
Tintic Branch was four miles from Eureka, with the tunnel at Homanville not yet completed, and graders at work beyond Eureka, to Mammoth and Silver City. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 2, 1891)

December 2, 1891
Letter from Eureka says track is four miles from town; still at work on a tunnel in Homansville canyon; and grading beyond Eureka to Mammoth and Silver City is in progress. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 2, 1891)

December 7, 1891
"Chair car 300 of the RGW is being placed on standard gauge trucks for service on the Tintic Branch." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 7, 1891)

Engines 51, 124 and 132 are in for overhaul; the 103 is being widened; and the 54 is waiting for work. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 7, 1891)

December 23, 1891
The old 'Spanish Fork' station, on the RGW, is now 'Vista'; the new 'spanish Fork' station is on the Tintic Branch. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 23, 1891)

December 24, 1891
RGW no. 30 out of the shop yesterday; the engine is one of two bought in Denver at a sheriff's sale; the Great Salt Lake & Hot Springs would like to buy the no. 30, but the RGW is not selling. Engine 51 will be out of the shop next week. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 24, 1891)

December 31, 1891
The depot at Eureka has been built, and side tracks now being put in. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 31, 1891)

1892
RGW completed a new three-mile spur between Jennings Junction and the Jennings stone quarry. Jennings Junction was located east of Pleasant Valley Junction, later known as Colton. (LeMassena, p. 101) The Jennings spur was extended in 1900 to reach the Potters Quarry. (LeMassena, p. 109) The combined spurs were removed in 1917 after the closure of both stone quarries. The entry for the 1917 removal referred to Kyune as being the point of connection, shown as Jennings Junction above. (LeMassena, p. 131)

1892
RGW completed a new two mile line between Eureka and Mammoth Junction to serve the new Mammoth Mill. The new line included an additional mile of joint (with OSL) trackage to reach the mill itself. (LeMassena, p. 101)

1892
RGW completed a one-mile spur, jointly owned with OSL, to serve the new Salt Lake City Union Stock Yards in North Salt Lake. (LeMassena, p. 101)

January 1, 1892
RGW "widened" ten engines; most narrow gauge equipment sold to RGS, only two chair cars being retained for future use; the old private car 'Trinidad' was sold to the GSL&HS road; and six new standard gauge passenger cars added. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 1, 1892)

January 17, 1892
The conversion of RGW engine no. 103 to standard gauge not yet completed. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 17, 1892)

February 4, 1892
RGW No. 103 came out of shops yesterday, and goes to the Sevier branch. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 4, 1892)

February 14, 1892
Five new freight engines for RGW received at Burnham. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 14, 1892)

February 27, 1892
RGW engines 33, 109, 110 and 122 in for repairs. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 27, 1892)

March 10, 1892
"Railroad Rumbles." "Mr. J. H. Bennett is out over the line on a special, accompanied by Savage, the artist, who is photographing points of interest, specially making a photo of the double circle at Tintic, which is a great engineering feat, that eclipses the Georgetown loop of Colorado, thereby scoring another success for the Rio Grande Western." (Salt Lake Daily Herald, March 10, 1892)

March 10, 1892
"J. H. Bennett of the Rio Grande Western and Photographer Savage are down on the Salina Branch taking views." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 10, 1892)

March 12, 1892
"Railroad Notes." "General Passenger Agent Bennett, of the Denver & Rio Grande, returned yesterday from a five days' photographing trip in the Eureka District." (Salt Lake Daily Herald, March 12, 1892)

March 12, 1892
"Photographer Savage and Mr. Bennett of the Rio Grande Western returned yesterday from the new Tintic line, where they have secured what they believe to be the best views ever taken in this territory." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 12, 1892)

March 24, 1892
RGW engine 111 being used as stationary boiler in shops, while old boilers are taken out and new ones installed. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 24, 1892)

March 26, 1892
"Tintic Branch Scenes" "Mr. Bennett of the Rio Grande Western has fine new photos in his office of scenes along the line of the Tintic Branch. He and Savage were down there not long ago, and fine negatives were taken of the loop and adjoining country. Mr. Bennett had four trains stationed on the loop so that they appeared one above the other, the train on the trestle making a fine showing. The country is very romantic, and it has been suggested to the road that side excursions be run this summer from Provo and Salt Lake to Eureka over the Tintic branch, and it is probable that this will be done." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 26, 1892)

May 7, 1892
On Tuesday, the Merrimac Hotel at Thistle was destroyed by fire; it served as the R. G. W.'s eating house at that point. (The Home Sentinel, Manti, May 7, 1892)

May 13, 1892
RGW engine 63 arrived at Pueblo yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 13, 1892)

June 2, 1892
RGW engines 39 and 152 collided north of Lehi yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 2, 1892)

June 22, 1892
RGW Engine 63 received in Salt Lake City yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 22, 1892)

September 2, 1892
Item on RGW 40, just out of the shops with new 60-inch drivers in place of the original 56-inch drivers; the first of several such rebuilds. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 2, 1892)

September 27, 1892
RGW 41 and 52 will next get larger drivers. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 27, 1892)

October 15, 1892
RGW 52 in process of rebuild; the 38 next. No. 123 just overhauled. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 15, 1892)

November 5, 1892
Item on RGW switcher No. 4, which hit a streetcar yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 5, 1892)

November 6, 1892
RGW engines 64, 65 and 66 have arrived at Grand Junction; to run between Grand Junction and Helper, and Rome engines with new drivers Helper to Ogden. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 6, 1892)

November 16, 1892
"Narrow-gauge engine No. 14 has been loaded on a flat for shipment to Grand Junction, for use beyond on the narrow gauge." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 16, 1892)

1893
RGW completed a two-mile spur between Mammoth Junction and Silver City, along with seven miles of yard trackage at Silver City, all to serve the new Tintic Standard Mill at Silver City. (LeMassena, p. 101)

1893
RGW completed a one-mile spur from Copper Plant Junction, north of Salt Lake City, to the newly completed copper mill and smelter of the Salt Lake Copper Co., located at about 1500 North in Salt Lake City. (part from LeMassena, p. 101)

April 2, 1893
The R. G. W. has just received four new Pullman sleepers, of twelve section and two drawing room plan, for use on the line. (Salt Lake Daily Herald, April 2, 1893)

April 19, 1893
The RGW s overhauling 11 engines at present, as well as baggage car 53, coach 211, and caboose no. 9, which has been practically rebuilt, with three more cabooses to get the same. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 19, 1893)

May 5, 1893
"The depot flower park, just north of the general offices, is coming forth with added lustre in the way of a new and ornamental fence about it." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 5, 1893)

May 21, 1893
RGW engine 34 badly damaged in smash at Provo on 19th Friday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 21, 1893)

May 21, 1893
Work commenced "during the coming week" on Rio Grande Western's new locomotive roundhouse in Ogden. Work was being done by the railroad's own forces. (Ogden Standard, May 21, 1893)

May 31, 1893
RGW car and paint shop being put up south of the roundhouse and west of the coal chutes; to be 40 x 252 feet in overall size; also an addition to the machine shop, 60 x 144 feet. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 31, 1893)

June 10, 1893
RGW to run 'first class coaches' to Wasatch on the Alta line this summer; tramway to Alta to be opened on the 15th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 10, 1893)

June 11, 1893
The R. G. W. announces that the Alta tramway will be open for business on and after June 15, 1893, one trip per day. (Salt Lake Daily Herald, June 11, 1893)

September 10, 1893
Savage has completed "a very handsome set" of pictures along the RGW and in Grand Valley in Colorado, and several 'magnificent' canyon views in the vicinity of Glenwood. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 10, 1893)

September 13, 1893
The RGW does not want the San Pete Valley to get to Manti. San Pete Valley right-of-way is to the west of RGW all the way to Manti, so the RGW built a spur at Ephraim across the San Pete Valley route, and parked several empty boxcars thereupon, with a loco standing by. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 13, 1893)

October 11, 1893
The Tribune prints the new wage schedule of the RGW -- a 10 percent cut all around, effective the 10th -- notice dated 6th, posted on the 7th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 11, 1893)

October 31, 1893
Union Pacific business car 03 was sent over to the RGW yard last night, and goes to Scofield today with Mr. Mageath, Superintendent of the Union Pacific Coal Department. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 31, 1893)

November 27, 1893
RGW switch engine 8 hit streetcar 25 at 5th west and North Temple yesterday morning at 10 o'clock - three persons on car injured. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 27, 1893)

November 27, 1893
Receivers appointed for Utah Central Railway. (Poor's, 1899, p. 262)

(This Utah Central was John W. Young's reorganization of his previous Salt Lake & Eastern railroad, under construction up Parleys Canyon toward Park City.)

Neither the RGW nor the D&RG were badly affected by the financial crisis of the Panic of 1893. (Athearn, pp. 181, 183; LeMassena, p. 101)

January 1, 1894
The RGW added $50,000 in new equipment. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 1, 1894)

June 18, 1894
On Sunday, 17th, Rio Grande Western train 1, engine 66, and train 4, engine 42, both passenger trains, met head-on at a point one mile west of Westwater station. No injuries, and damage to the engines was only minor, as speed was just 10 m.p.h. at the time. (Salt Lake Daily Herald, June 18, 1894)

June 18, 1894
Wreck yesterday of Trains 1 and 2, RGW, just west of Westwater, No. 2 got stopped before the crash, but engineer of No. 1 (Rice) froze -- "It's all my fault; I got my orders mixed." Engines crashed, but stayed on track, though tenders and baggage cars mixed it up all right. Both crews managed to jump before the smash; no injuries. The Herald reported the wreck west of Westwater, on the R. G. W., as involving train 1, engine 66, and train 4, engine 42. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 18, 1894)

July 18, 1894
Palmer's car 'Nomad' has been in RGW shops for past three weeks, and comes out tomorrow. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 18, 1894)

July 29, 1894
The Rio Grande Western is building a new car shop, some 60 by 200 feet in size, just west of the new paint shop recently completed. Engine 66 is out after an overhaul. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 29, 1894)

July 29, 1894
A new wool warehouse of Holthusen & Co., near RGW freight house, is 35 by 100 feet, 2 floors, roof and sides covered in corrugated iron. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 29, 1894)

August 8, 1894
Wreck on RGW yesterday, one mile west of Castilla Springs -- Engine 138, light and westbound, and Engine 42, eastbound, banged into each other quite badly, as Arthur Pickring, fireman on 138, was killed. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 8, 1894)

September 4, 1894
"Hooper" on RGW changed to "Roy", account post office is Roy. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 4, 1894)

September 5, 1894
RGW circular 51, on and after 6th, trains on Wasatch Branch dropped. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 5, 1894)

September 7, 1894
RGW engine 64 getting general overhaul. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 7, 1894)

September 7, 1894
RGW is putting up a new two stall enginehouse in Scofield, of corrugated iron, to replace the one that burned in February. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 7, 1894)

September 16, 1894
RGW enginehouse at Springville, two stalls, burned on the morning of September 13th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 16, 1894)

September 25, 1894
RGW engine 42 out of shop after wreck repairs; no. 125 out of shop after general overhaul. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 25, 1894)

September 26, 1894
RGW engine 64 out of shops after overhaul. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 26, 1894)

October 26, 1894
RGW has been putting larger drivers on some of the 2-8-0 engines, and no. 148 is next. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 26, 1894)

October 29, 1894
New two-stall enginehouse to be built at Bingham Junction, of a frame construction, covered in corrugated iron. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 29, 1894)

November 4, 1894
RGW shops at work rebuilding no. 121, which blew up at Scofield in February of this year. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 4, 1894)

November 23, 1894
Doors of RGW roundhouse in SLC about to be 14 inches wider and two feet higher than at present, so all classes of engines will clear. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 23, 1894)

December 1, 1894
RGW Engine 119 just out after overhaul, and got larger drivers by way of new and much thicker tires. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 1, 1894)

December 18, 1894
R.G.W. engine 65, a compound, is out of the shops after overhaul; and the car shop is building two snowplows and one flanger. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 18, 1894)

January 1895
Sevier Branch south from Salina to Belknap (40 miles) was laid as standard gauge using light narrow gauge rail and was operated with widened narrow gauge locomotives. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 27, 1895)

January 1, 1895
RGW -- new carpenter's shop at SLC, 60 x 290 feet; and a new hotel at Thistle, at cost of $3,000.00 (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 1, 1895)

January 4, 1895
The new snow plow recently built by the RGW in the SLC shops has been mounted on an engine, and the same sent to Thistle, yesterday. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 4, 1895)

January 27, 1895
The RGW branch from Thistle to Salina is still laid with the old and light 'narrow gauge' iron, and being operated with the old narrow gauge engines now widened. As these engines are wearing out, and the RGW has an offer on the rails, it is likely that it will soon be relaid with rails that will hold the regular standard gauge engines. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 27, 1895)

March 3, 1895
J. H. Bennett, on RGW, has chosen to resign, rather than work under the new Traffic Manager, Babcock, who was once a flunkie under Bennett. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 3, 1895)

March 6, 1895
RGW car 'A' is undergoing a thorough overhaul. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 6, 1895)

September 4, 1895
The RGW has just completed a new depot at Lehi. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 4, 1895)

April 12, 1896
The RGW is building a new freight depot on the southwest corner of 2nd South and 4th West (now 5th West). (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 12, 1896)

May 21, 1896
Rio Grande Western track crossed the town line into Richfield on 20th of May, 1896, at 4:20 p.m. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 21, 1896)

May 22, 1896
The R. G. W. will begin regular passenger train schedule to Richfield on June 1st, and will run a special excursion to that place on the 2nd. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 22, 1896)

June 2, 1896
A celebration was held for the first train to arrive in Richfield, on the Sevier Railway. Photos show a locomotive no. 2, decked out with bunting and flags. The glass on the locomotive's headlight was lettered with "6-2-1896".

July 1896
Sevier Railway was completed between Salina and Sevier. (Poor's, 1896 p. 329)

November 1, 1896
Sevier Railway completed to Belknap. (Poor's, 1899, p. 682) (Poor's for 1899, p. 682, says the line was completed to Richfield, rather than Belknap, on November 1, 1896.)

(LeMassena, p. 101, says that the 40 miles between Salina and Belknap were completed as an extension of the Sevier Railway in 1896.)

May 8, 1897
Utah Central Railway sold under foreclosure, for $277,000.00. (Poor's, 1898 p. 262)

(Wilson, on p. 97, says that RGW bought the Utah Central, a narrow gauge line from Salt Lake City to Park City in 1898.)

June 24, 1897
"Utah Central Bought", by the RGW, says the item; tracks still in up to Fort and beyond; this item says the U.C. has seven locomotives, and 143 other cars. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 24, 1897)

June 26, 1897
"Hail to the Rio Grande Western." "About the best news received in Park City in many a day was the announcement on Thursday that the Rio Grande Western had purchased the Utah Central road." This, of course, to be of great benefit to Park City, "...and it will result in the building of a depot in Park City, a concession that the Utah Central people studiously failed to grant." (Park Record, Park City, June 26, 1897)

August 30, 1897
Rio Grande Western began laying rail in Provo for its line in Provo Canyon, with Heber as the destination. (Salt Lake Tribune, August 31, 1897, "yesterday")

September 17, 1897
The RGW is building two new cabooses in the shops. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 17, 1897)

October 6, 1897
The RGW presently has engines 8, 63, 142 and 148 being 'very fully overhauled.' (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 6, 1897)

October 10, 1897
Accident on RGW at Thistle on the 8th -- engine 52 backed into engine 9, while the 9 was on the way to the coal dock. 9 was 'very badly damaged', the 52 only slightly. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 10, 1897)

December 29, 1897
Utah Central Railroad incorporated by RGW interests to purchase the property, rights and interests of the Salt Lake & Fort Douglas Railway, the Salt Lake & Eastern Railway, and the Utah Central Railway in and around Salt Lake City and up Parleys Canyon to Park City. The new Utah Central did not include the portions of the original Salt Lake & Eastern that had been graded east and south of Park City towards Kamas, which were transferred to the new Utah Eastern, also organized by RGW. (Utah corporation index 2146)

December 29, 1897
Utah Eastern Railway incorporated by RGW interests to build from Heber east to the Colorado State line. Also to take over the interests of the former Utah Central Railway in Wasatch and Summit Counties, east and south of Park City. (Utah corporation index 2145)

1898
According to LeMassena, p. 101, the newly acquired Utah Central Railroad consisted of the following:

(Mill Creek would likely be today's Sugar House, with the Utah Central line being along and on today's Highland Drive. Wilford was likely the location of the Interstate Brick plant at 3300 South, the location of today's Brickyard Plaza shopping center.)

(This writer was told in 1979 by Robert W. Edwards that the Parleys Canyon extension of the Salt Lake & Fort Douglas, known as Salt Lake & Eastern, was along the bank of the Salt Lake & Jordan irrigation canal, which is the alignment followed by today's McClelland Street, at about 1050 East between 800 South and 1700 South, then along today's Highland Drive. At 2100 South, the canal is located at 1250 East. The canal was completed in July 1882. A good history of the Salt Lake & Jordan Canal is located on Salt Lake City's web site)

1898
Most of the former Salt Lake & Fort Douglas line was removed, from Lincoln Park Junction to Fort Douglas, Red Butte Quarry, and Emigration. (LeMassena, p. 101)

(Since the Fort Douglas line separated from the Mill Creek line at about 900 South and 1000 East, Lincoln Park Junction was likely near today's Lincoln Street at about 950 East. The mainline of the former Salt Lake & Fort Douglas line was along 800 South from its connection in the west with RGW, to 700 East, then along 700 East to 900 South, then along 900 South to "Lincoln Park Junction".)

1898
RGW added a second track to the steepest part of the Soldier's Summit grade, from Tucker to Soldiers Summit. (LeMassena, p. 101)

January 1, 1898
RGW leased the Utah Central Railroad for operation, lease period was for 49 years. RGW owned all of the stock and guaranteed all of the road's bonds. (Poor's, 1900, p. 611)

January 4, 1898
The Rio Grande Western/D. & R. G. city ticket office will be moved in the very near future to 109 West 2nd South, in the Dooley Building. (Salt Lake Daily Herald, January 4, 1898)

January 11, 1898
The Rio Grande Western has begun the use of semaphore signals, the first one, at Thistle, now in use. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 11, 1898)

January 18, 1898
RGW "secured" the deeds to Utah Central. (Salt Lake Tribune, January 1, 1899)

January 27, 1898
"Wreck at Springville." "Springville, Utah, Jan. 26. -- A wreck occurred on the Rio Grande Western at the yards in this city at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon, engine No. 135, pulling train No. 27, a heavy freight train, smashed into engine No. 129, which was attached to freight train No. 26, that was standing in the yard. Just at the east end of the yard limits there is a curve which prevents a long view of the track, and Engineer Stewart of engine No. 135, which was pulling the train going west, did not discover the train on the track until he rounded the curve, then he reversed his engine and whistled for the other train to back out of the way. Engineer Rugg of engine No. 129 could not back his train so they came together with considerable force. And as a result eight freight cars are more or less damaged, some of them smashed into kindling wood. Four of the cars are off the track. The engines were not damaged to any extent. They both lost their pilots, and engine No. 129's front end was smashed in, and the probable amount of damage will foot up to $7000. There was no one injured in the collision." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 27, 1898)

February 1, 1898
"Utah Central Change." "The Road Now Operated by the Rio Grande Western." "With the ringing of the bells last midnight the Utah Central passed into the hands of the Rio Grande Western." That is, at 12:01am, 1 February 1898. At present, the only real change is to be the arrival and departure of Utah Central trains from the R.G.W. depot on Second South. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 1, 1898)

March 4, 1898
RGW timetable No. 34, in effect 12:01 am March 5, 1898. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 4, 1898)

March 22, 1898
John Hickey is the RGW's Master Mechanic -- had been with the N. P. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 22, 1898)

April 13, 1898
The R.G.W. has just received two chair cars, of the very latest pattern. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 13, 1898)

May 23, 1898
The R.G.W. has gotten some new coaches from Pullman, to go along with the new chair cars recently received. All are of the wide vestibule pattern. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 23, 1898)

May 24, 1898
The R.G.W. yesterday added a 60' theatrical baggage car, which has side and end doors, but no platforms. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 24, 1898)

June 7, 1898
Change of station name - "Pleasant Valley Junction" is now known as "Colton," in honor of one of the old officials. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 7, 1898)

July 10, 1898
"All the old Utah Central equipment will soon be relettered 'R.G.W.' and renumbered." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 10, 1898)

July 16, 1898
"Branch Line Improvement." "Equipment of the Park City road to be Overhauled..." "Regarding the equipment of the narrow gauge line, Mr. Welby states that it is now being overhauled and all the old or unserviceable equipment will go to the scrap heap, while the serviceable engines and cars will be gradually put through the shops for repairs, new paint and lettering." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 16, 1898)

July 19, 1898
RGW timetable No 35, in effect Sunday July 17, 1898. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 19, 1898)

August 9, 1898
The RGW has gotten 'some large and beautiful views of Parley's Canyon' from Savage, some of which will be used in advertising materials. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 9, 1898)

September 27, 1898
The RGW has replaced the 45 pound rail between Manti and Spring City with 56 pound steel rail. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 27, 1898)

October 22, 1898
All Rio Grande Western baggage and express cars are being lettered for Wells, Fargo & Co. Express. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 22, 1898)

October 22, 1898
A new Pullman sleeper-buffet car in service on the RGW is "Buda." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 22, 1898)

October 28, 1898
A mixing of engines at Springville yesterday -- engines 36 and 10 were outside the enginehouse, the 137 inside. The hostler, moving 36 about, lost control, hit the 10, shoving it through the enginehouse doors, which more closed at the time, hitting in turn the 137, and putting the 137 through the back wall. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 28, 1898)

November 1, 1898
The RGW has secured a right-of-way across the electric light company's works to the new depot site, in Park City. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 1, 1898)

November 4, 1898
The RGW train down from Park City yesterday made the initial trip over the new trestle in Lamb's Canyon. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 4, 1898)

November 5, 1898
RGW timetable No. 36 in effect 12:01am today. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 5, 1898)

November 28, 1898
"Wants More Cars" on the broad gauge; item says that RGW has 933 broad gauge and 87 narrow gauge freight cars. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 28, 1898)

December 28, 1898
The new R.G.W. depot at Springville has been completed, and was occupied by the agent, for business, on the 26th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 28, 1898)

January 1, 1899
Review of 1898: The RGW bought eight engines, four chair cars, two coaches, one theatrical baggage car and 32 freight cars, and built four caboose cars. The RGW built a new station at Springville. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 1, 1899)

1899
RGW completed an 11 Mile branch from Provo to Upper Falls. From Upper Falls to Heber City, 15 miles, the continuation of the line to Heber was completed by the Utah Eastern Railway, incorporated in December 1897. (LeMassena, p. 107)

1899
RGW completed a five mile branch from Utah Mine, near Scofield, to Clear Creek Mine No. 2. The new line was owned by the newly organized RGW subsidiary, Carbon County Railway. (LeMassena, p. 107)

1899
RGW completed a 17 mile branch from Mounds, on the mainline east of Price, to Sunnyside. The new line was owned by the newly organized RGW subsidiary, Carbon County Railway. (LeMassena, p. 107)

1899
RGW completed a two mile spur from Ogden Sugar Junction to the Ogden Sugar Works. This was jointly owned with OSL. (LeMassena, p. 107)

January 9, 1899
"...last year the Western got several coaches and chair cars,..., and has but lately ordered three palatial dining-cars." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 9, 1899)

January 11, 1899
"The Rio Grande Western has ordered another sixty-foot baggage car similar to the one it bought last year. The car will be part of the Western's quota of through cars for Wells, Fargo & Co. between San Francisco and Chicago." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 11, 1899)

January 25, 1899
100 stock cars being built for the Rio Grande Western by the Illinois Car & Equipment Co., cars being 36 feet 6 inches long and of 30 ton capacity. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 25, 1899)

February 27, 1899
"Local Rails for Nevada;" info from the White Pine (Nev.) 'News' says "...that the Glasgow & Western company has purchased from the Rio Grande Western railroad rails, locomotives and other plant formerly used on the narrow gauge, for the railroad from Wells to Cherry Creek." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 27, 1899)

February 28, 1899
Rio Grande Western chair car 402 has just left the shops. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 28, 1899)

March 17, 1899
"The 'Nomad' is in the local shops of the Rio Grande Western." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 17, 1899)

March 21, 1899
The Railway Age says that Pullman is building three coaches for the Rio Grande Western. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 21, 1899)

March 31, 1899
'Nomad', in overhaul now, is painted Tuscan red, as is all passenger equipment on the Rio Grande Western. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 31, 1899)

March 31, 1899
The RGW has just received a Model G Barnhart steam shovel, which has a scoop capacity of 3 yards. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 31, 1899)

April 6, 1899
"No. 71, the big passenger engine for the desert run, was turned out of the Rio Grande Western shops yesterday, looking new and bright." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 6, 1899)

19 April 1899
"President Palmer is now occupying the 'Nomad,' which has recently been through the Salt Lake shops." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 19, 1899)

April 26, 1899
"The first engine that has received a general overhauling at the Thistle shops of the R.G.W. has just been out upon her first trip. It is engine no. 2, one of the 'set-out' engines." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 26, 1899)

May 8, 1899
"Work in Thistle Shops," a paragraph on Thistle and the shops of the Rio Grande Western there, half of which is of no value; the other half says: "Two set-out engines have lately been given a general overhauling and were turned out in first-class shape, engine No. 2 having taken a train of fourteen loads of stock from the branch, the largest train ever pulled by one of this class. Engine 4 has not yet made her first trip, but it is certain she can do almost if not quite as well. These set-out engines are to be used this coning summer upon the branches." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 8, 1899)

May 21, 1899
The Rio Grande Western is to take part in the "Chicago-Portland Special," in connection with the D&RG and the OSL, on a Denver to Portland branch of the service. The Western is painting up new chair cars 402 and 403, for which "the standard Tuscan red ... has been changed to Van Dyke brown [with] rich gold facings." Cars will be lettered to match the scheme of the OSL cars. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 21, 1899)

May 22, 1899
The RGW has four old engineers, three of whom worked on the D&RG narrow gauge in Colorado prior to 1883, and one, Stewart, who worked on the Utah & Pleasant Valley and stayed on when the D&RGW bought the U&PV in 1882. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 22, 1899)

May 22, 1899
"The 1201, an 80,000 pounds capacity coal car, has been turned out of the Western shops." RGW no. 1201 matches OSL no. 5001, built in Fall 1898. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 22, 1899)

May 24, 1899
There will be a new RGW timetable on June 1st. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 24, 1899)

May 25, 1899
"New Color Standard." "The standard color, Tuscan red, now used for Rio Grande Western passenger equipment, will be succeeded by the Van Dyke brown. Vice-President and General Manager D. C. Dodge made the statement yesterday,..." This change the result of Dodge seeing the chair cars for the Chicago-Portland Special and liking their appearance. "...the Van Dyke brown is almost a black..." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 25, 1899)

May 29, 1899
RGW dining car 'Ogden' arrived last night, the first on the RGW; to go into service Thursday; car is painted Tuscan red, with mahogany interior. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 29, 1899)

May 30, 1899
The other two of the dining cars for RGW, 'Salt Lake' and 'Provo,' have arrived. The Superintendent of Dining Cars is D. S. Fraser; on the cars the following: car 'Salt Lake,' W. C. Brady is Steward, J. C. Eichhorn is chef; on the car 'Ogden,' C. G. Lewis is Steward and P. Linnet is chef; and on the car 'Provo,' H. S. Hubbard is Steward and Frank Rice the chef. "The waiters are all experienced colored men..." "The linen, silver and Haviland china are all marked 'Rio Grande Western Rwy..." At present, cars are still scheduled to go into service on Thursday the 1st of June. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 30, 1899)

May 31, 1899
"Salt Lake' on Exhibition." "The Rio Grande Western dining car 'salt Lake' will be open for visitors between 3 and 5 this afternoon. The tables will be laid and the niches between the windows filled with palms and flowers for the event. All who wish to see the car will be welcomed. It will be at the depot." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 31, 1899)

June 1, 1899
"Open for Inspection." "About 150 people visited the Rio Grande Western dining-car 'salt Lake' as it stood on the side track ready to go out. The tables were all set, the chef and assistants in white linen were in the kitchen, while Conductor Brady and assistants were in the main salon. The tables were prettily decorated with roses and carnations and potted plants were placed over each table." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 1, 1899)

June 5, 1899
"The Rio Grande Western's heavy engine 203 is out of the shops." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 5, 1899)

June 19, 1899
Name change on the R. G. W. -- Clear Creek is changed to Tucker; and Mud Creek is changed to Clear Creek. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 19, 1899)

June 26, 1899
RGW declares a dividend of 1-1/4 percent on the preferred stock. The D.& R.G. also declares, but 2 percent for them. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 26, 1899)

July 8, 1899
RGW engine 202 and 12 Pullmans made 65 mph between Provo and SLC. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 8, 1899)

July 15, 1899
The "Colorado - Utah Line" legend is to go on all RGW cars as they are repainted in brown with gold lettering. Mail and express car no. 3 is the first car so done; it has 'Wells, Fargo & Co.' and 'Express,' curved, in the space between doors on the sides, with 'Baggage' at one end, and 'U. S. Mail' at the other. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 15, 1899)

July 15, 1899
"It is expected that trains will run into the new R. G. W. depot one week from tomorrow. A gang of men will be up Monday to lay the new tracks, etc." (Park Record, Park City, July 15, 1899)

July 19, 1899
Baggage car 57 and coach 208 are next to get the "Colorado - Utah Line" treatment, and are now in the paint shop; Mail & Express no. 3 is done. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 19, 1899)

July 29, 1899
The RGW's Sunnyside branch has 10 miles graded and 3-1/2 miles laid with steel rails. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 29, 1899)

August 5, 1899
A wreck yesterday on the Rio Grande Western, at Solitude. Fruit Express, train No. 16, Engine no. 134, engineer Frank McMahon and fireman James H. Whalen, both out of Grand Junction, and both died in the wreck. McMahon had transferred from the Colorado Midland in 1894. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 5, 1899)

August 14, 1899
RGW car 'B' has just come out of the shops. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 14, 1899)

August 23, 1899
"To Change All Cars"- the RGW plans to repaint all passenger equipment to "Colorado - Utah Line" light brown scheme. Colorado - Utah Line cars are now used on trains 9 and 10. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 23, 1899)

August 25, 1899
Wreck at Nolan on the RGW on the 23rd; Extra East and Train No. 17 ran head-on. Robert Matthews, engineer, dead. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 25, 1899)

September 1899
RGW to lay third rail over the narrow gauge Utah Central from Salt Lake City to the cement plant in Parleys Canyon, and will use a standard gauge locomotive to "shuttle" cars from the plant to Salt Lake City. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 3, 1899; September 19, 1899)

September 21, 1899
RGW completed to Heber. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 22, 1899) Work began in February. (Wilson, p. 97)

September 2, 1899
RGW branch from Mounds to Sunnyside mines in Whitmore Canyon to be finished in a few days. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 2, 1899)

September 4, 1899
The RGW, when it took over the Utah Central, did away with the switchbacks and put in the long trestle at the mouth of Lamb's Canyon. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 4, 1899)

September 22, 1899
"Track Reaches Heber" on the Provo Canyon Branch, and Supplement No. 1 to Timetable No.39 will be issued this week; the last rail was laid last evening, and Circular No. 70, signed by Gen. Supt. Welby, gives notice that the Branch will be officially opened October 1, 1899. The stations and mileposts, given in the paper, are as shown below. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 22, 1899)

Station Mile
Provo 0.0
Smoot 1.1
Caryhurst 5.8
Nunn's 9.4
Falls 9.8
Forks 11.8
Wallsburg 18.0
Charleston 21.8
Heber 25.8

October 1, 1899
The Rio Grande Western has completed the extension from Scofield to Clear Creek (formerly Mud Creek), which point the track reached yesterday. Length of extension is seven miles, and the reason for it was the coal mines at Clear Creek. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 1, 1899)

October 8, 1899
"The Rio Grande Western has had three new and very handsome Pullman sleepers assigned to its through trains." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 8, 1899)

October 14, 1899
New RGW Timetable No. 40, in effect 12:01 am 16 October 1899 (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 14, 1899)

November 20, 1899
Carbon County Railway (first) incorporated by RGW interests to operate a railway from Mounds on the RGW to the Sunnyside coal mines, and from Scofield on the RGW to the Pleasant Valley coal mines. (Utah corporation index 2749)

November 21, 1899
"The new dining car of the Rio Grande Western will be named 'Utah."' (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 21, 1899)

November 23, 1899
"The baggage car no. 5, now owned by the Western, was bought by John W. Young, for the Fort Douglas road, of the Utah & Northern. It was built at Eagle Rock, Idaho, in 1883." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 23, 1899)

November 29, 1899
The RGW started Monday, 27th, tearing down old ice houses across the track from the depot in SLC, there being a new ice house at 5th South; new boiler shop is up, and the interior finishing in progress. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 29, 1899)

December 15, 1899
The RGW has finished pulling down the old icehouses; and the 'Nomad' is in for repairs at the shops. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 15, 1899)

December 17, 1899
The Pullman dining car "Utah" to make its first trip today, coming in on train No. 1. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 17, 1899)

December 31, 1899
RGW bought four dining cars; new machine shop in 1898. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 31, 1899)

1900
George Gould's Missouri Pacific began buying stock in D&RG, and D&RG in turn began buying stock of RGW. (Athearn, p. 191)

Gould became Chairman of the D&RG in 1901, and since D&RG also now controlled RGW, Gould directed that Edward Jeffery, President of D&RG, replace Palmer as President of RGW. The two companies became one, although their names remained separate for eight more years. With George Gould's control of Missouri Pacific, D&RG, and RGW, he had a continuous route from St. Louis to Ogden. (LeMassena, pp. 74, 109)

(George Gould was the oldest son, born in 1864, of Jay Gould, born in 1836, one of the most notorious of the Wall Street rail barons. Gould was less active in the last two or three years of his life, but his son George ran parts of his shrinking empire after 1891. Jay Gould died in December 1892 and his empire fell apart, leaving only the Missouri Pacific to be controlled by Gould's family and associates. After trying to build a transcontinental line with the combined MP, D&RG, RGW, and WP, and losing the contest to both heavy debt and E. H. Harriman, Gould himself lost control of MP and was removed as president of MP in 1911. At the same time, his Equitable Trust lost control of WP and D&RG, by this time merged with RGW.)

1900
RGW built a new two-mile line from Roper station east to Sugar House to connect with its Utah Central line to Park City. This new line was owned by the Utah Central Railway. (LeMassena, p. 109)

1900
RGW completed the rebuilding, and conversion from narrow gauge to standard gauge, of the former Utah Central line from Sugar House (Mill Creek) to Park City. (part from Wilson, p. 97)

Nine miles of the line, from Barclay to Gorgoza, over the summit, was built by way of a new alignment and included a new tunnel under the summit. The original narrow gauge line between Barclay and Gorgoza was removed at the same time. (part from LeMassena, p. 109)

1900
RGW completed a new two-mile spur south from Park City to the Ontario Tunnel. (LeMassena, p. 109)

1900
RGW removed the one-mile Diamond Quarry Spur, from Diamond Junction to Diamond Quarry. (LeMassena, p. 109) Diamond Quarry was a stone quarry at the mouth of Diamond Creek, just west of Thistle. The spur was completed in 1887. (LeMassena, p. 87) Converted from narrow gauge to standard gauge in 1890. (LeMassena, p. 91)

1900
RGW completed the construction of a two mile spur from Jennings to Potters Quarry. (LeMassena, p. 109) The three mile Jennings Quarry Spur was completed in 1892, and this two miles of new construction extended the Jennings Spur to Potters Quarry, bringing the total length to five miles. (View a map of the Jennings and Potter Spur)

1900
RGW removed the trackage of the former Salt Lake & Fort Douglas Railway in Salt Lake City, along 800 South to Sugar House (Mill Creek). (part from LeMassena, p. 109)

(Sugar House was an area of eastern Salt Lake City near today's 2100 South and 1100 East where the pioneers had attempted to build and operate a sugar factory. The factory was under construction during 1854 and was closed as a failure in the fall of 1855 after operating only one season. The Mill Creek name possibly came from the creek that was used as a source of power for the sugar factory.)

This activity on the former Utah Central line did away with the former SL&FD line along the streets in Salt Lake City, and replaced the Utah Central (originally Salt Lake & Eastern) line along 800 South to Sugar House (Mill Creek) with a new direct east-west line between Sugar House and the RGW mainline further south of Salt Lake City at Roper. The new connection, along with the rebuilt Utah Central line from Sugar House to Park City, then became the new Park City Branch. When the Park City Branch was cut back to Sugar House in 1956, it became just the Sugar House Branch.

1900
RGW completed a two mile extension of the Jennings Quarry Spur, extended to another stone quarry at Potters. (LeMassena, p. 109)

1900
RGW completed a one mile spur from Springville to a nearby sugar factory (in Spanish Fork?). (LeMassena, p. 109)

January 3, 1900
"Lights Turned On" - electricity is now used to light the R.G.W.'s shops, yard and offices, doing away with the oil lamps used before. The plant was installed by Intermountain Electric Co. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 3, 1900)

January 5, 1900
"The 'Nomad' has emerged from the Rio Grande Western shops." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 5, 1900)

January 13, 1900
RGW engine 63, built as a Baldwin compound, is about to have a set of Richmond compound cylinders put in, they having been received. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 13, 1900)

February 10, 1900
RGW passenger train No. 3 wrecked at Tucker on Thursday, 8th; no serious injuries, but four cars need work. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 10, 1900)

February 16, 1900
The R. G. W. is replacing the old bridge over the Green River with a new steel structure. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 16, 1900)

February 20, 1900
Grading on the Marysvale line, R.G.W., is nearly completed. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 20, 1900)

February 20, 1900
The new bridge over the Green River on the RGW is one of three spans, pin-connected through truss style, by Edgemoor Bridge Co. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 20, 1900)

February 24, 1900
R.G.W. timetable No. 41 in effect 12:01 am Sunday February 25, 1900. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 24, 1900)

March 2, 1900
"The Railway Review has an illustrated article on the double circle of the Rio Grande Western's Tintic branch." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 2, 1900)

March 6, 1900
R.G.W. timetable No. 42 in effect 12:01 am, March 6, 1900. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 6, 1900)

March 8, 1900
The Rio Grande Western is relocating one mile of track between Murray and Bingham Junction. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 8, 1900)

March 13, 1900
An item on R.G.W. 'little 04,' which was brought over from the Rio Grande Southern. Engineers Ben Estes and John Stewart and fireman Ralph Cottrell say that they have found a mark on her that they remember, which they say makes this engine to be old number 78; "The engine came back to go on the Utah Central. Its plate bears the date"1880." (Pitchard noted that the records do not bear out the above mentioned numbers.) (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 13, 1900)

March 18, 1900
The R.G.W. will change time again on the 25th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 18, 1900)

March 23, 1900
"Three cabooses are being built in the Western's shops." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 23, 1900)

March 24, 1900
RGW Timetable No. 43, effective March 25, 1900. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 24, 1900)

April 1900
Residents of Salt Lake City's Eighth South Street petitioned the Salt Lake City Council for their assistance getting Rio Grande Western to move its tracks to Park City, along Eighth South and Ninth South, to a new location outside the city limits. A total of 450 property owners had signed the petition that had already passed the council's finance committee, with the property owners offering to pay the cost of purchasing new land for the new line. The city council approved a resolution that the move would be for the benefit of city residents, and the council directed the city attorney to draft a resolution with the proper language requesting that the railroad company move its tracks. The railroad company admitted that it would benefit from the move by reducing the danger posed to streetcars and other vehicles along the route. On June 8th, the council voted to contribute $3,000 to the cost of purchasing the needed property for the new line, if the residents directly affeceted contributed $2,000, making the total $5,000, which was the railroad's estimate for the purchases needed. In July, the railroad raised its estimate from $5,000 to $8,000, and Judge LeGrand Young, the chief mover of the prosed move, was attempting to have the city pay the additional $3,000. During October 1900, Rio Grande Western had at least one property condemnation suit in the courts, condemning the needed right-of-way for the new line that was to be located along Twelfth South (today's 2100 South). On October 13, 1900, the railroad accepted the city's offered bonus of $5,000 to have a new line built outside the city limits. (Salt Lake Herald, April 4, 1900; April 7, 1900; June 9, 1900; July 11, 1900; October 13, 1900; October 14, 1900)

April 14, 1900
"Car 'A' has just emerged from the Rio Grande western shops." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 14, 1900)

April 23, 1900
RGW Engine No. 5, at Thistle for some time, has come up to go into the shops at Salt Lake for repairs. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 23, 1900)

April 25, 1900
"The diner 'Ogden,' which was on the Utah Central wrecked train, went out on No. 6 yesterday." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 25, 1900)

April 26, 1900
"No. 64, long baggage car, is the first of the new cars to be received by the Western. It has been placed in service." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 26, 1900)

April 26, 1900
"The Denver Times of Tuesday says: 'This morning the Rio Grande Western received a train of new coaches and combination baggage cars fresh from the shops, which will be placed on the through line. They are lettered on the sides in gilt letters, 'Colorado - Utah Line;' in bracket lettering on the sides near the ends are the words, 'Rio Grande Western,' but the catch line is the first mentioned. They are the finest coaches that have yet come to Denver, and were greatly admired by railroad men seeing them at the depot this morning.' " (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 26, 1900)

April 28, 1900
"The new cafe car of the Rio Grande Western will be placed in service on No.'s 1 and 4 on Sunday." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, April 28, 1900)

May 1, 1900
A drawing/picture of the RGW's new bridge over the Green River, shows four spans, one of which is flat-topped, the other three curved; cost of the bridge given as $54,000.00. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 1, 1900)

May 2, 1900
The Scofield mine disaster occurred yesterday, the 1st, at 10:25 am. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 2, 1900)

May 3, 1900
R.G.W. now has 20 vestibuled passenger cars. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 3, 1900)

May 4, 1900
"New Passenger Equipment." "The Rio Grande Western's new passenger equipment is all here and very fine are the cars. First is the cafe car No. 500, which has a coach end for smokers, and a dining room seating sixteen, a cafe and large kitchen in the other end. The two first class coaches 217 and 218 are of the finest type; two combination passenger and baggage No. 98 and 99; two straight baggage cars; two long excursion cars; and two combination baggage, mail and express cars. All of the windows are of the new double style casing with circular top sash. Steel platforms, full wide vestibules and perfect appointments are features." "The long excursion cars each seat eighty people." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 4, 1900)

May 8, 1900
RGW Timetable No. 45 in effect May 13, 1900. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 8, 1900)

May 14, 1900
"Dining-car 'Utah' is in the Burnham shops. Cafe car '500,' which was built for the Tintic run, is filling in on the dining-car run, eight cars being needed." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 14, 1900)

June 3, 1900
"P. Malstran, one of the Rio Grande Western's oldest conductors, was in town yesterday. He has been on the branch for seventeen years, even to the old days of the Wasatch & Jordan Valley and the Bingham Canyon & Camp Floyd." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 3, 1900)

June 5, 1900
"Big 63's Fast Run." "Engine 63 of the Rio Grande Western, lately fitted with Richmond compound cylinders, did herself proud down on the desert one day not long ago. It was pulling No. 6, and the train was an hour late. From Helper to Grand Junction the run was made in 4 hours and 11 minutes, the schedule time being 5:20. It beat its own schedule by nine minutes and made up the lost hour, and this with two water stops and one flag stop." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 5, 1900)

June 11, 1900
"The Coupler Fight" over the Sams coupler. After August 1, 1900 the Union Pacific will not accept as an automatic coupler on cars of foreign roads - and most of the RGW's cars are equipped with the Sams coupler. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 11, 1900)

June 14, 1900
"New coach 218, a beauty, has arrived at the depot and was sent down on No. 8 last night for the Scandinavian excursion today over the Western." "Western baggage car 55, which has been on the sidetrack for several years, has been taken to the shops for general repairs. Car 51 is also in." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 14, 1900)

June 19, 1900
R. G. W. "Directors Arrive," with President Palmer and in his car 'Nomad,' Colonel Dodge in car 'A' and with car 'B' as well. Also in the party was Dr. Wm. A. Bell, of Colorado Springs. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 19, 1900)

June 20, 1900
The RGW directors' special left last evening at 8:10pm as the second section of train No. 4, engine 53, coach 98, car 'A' and the 'Nomad;' Sup't. Welby, Chief Engineer Yard and Sup't. Sharp went along. Earlier yesterday, the directors, with Palmer, went as a special, in a coach and car 'B,' up to Altus, the first broad gauge train to that point. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 20, 1900)

June 24, 1900
The RGW will relay the rail taken from the Park City narrow gauge on the extension from Belknap to Marysvale, starting July 4th. Grade was finished to Marysvale some time ago, and the bridges were completed last night, now just waiting for rail. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 24, 1900)

June 26, 1900
On Sunday, the 24th, the R.G.W. ran an excursion train consisting entirely of vestibuled equipment, the first such train operated. The cars were baggage-smoker no. 98, excursion cars 300 and 301, and coaches 217 and 218, all "painted exactly alike in the new color and lettering..." The color was not given. The excursion was from Salt Lake City to Provo and return. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 26, 1900)

June 28, 1900
"The new Rio Grande Western switcher 21 is here from the Schenectady works. It is very lively in its movements and has no pony truck but merely six drivers. The tank is of the sloping-top design." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 28, 1900)

July 2, 1900
"Schenectady switcher No. 21 of the Western is giving the laugh to the set-out engines like 12 and 3. Even 133 is slow when compared to the new sprinter. The engine is now in service." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 2, 1900)

July 8, 1900
"Rio Grande Western cafe car 500 has been taken off No. 1 and is in the shops. This car was bought for the Tintic Flyers and it may be that it will be put in service on No. 7 and No. 8 at once." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 8, 1900)

July 10, 1900
"The New 401" "Rio Grande Western's Heavy Freight Engines on Way" they being new 2-8-0 engines from the Richmond works, four in the 300 class and four in the 400 class, the difference being that the 300's have 56" drivers, and the 400's have 51" drivers. A cut is given of the 401. The engines have 22x28" cylinders, and an engine weight of 179,800 pounds. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 10, 1900)

July 11, 1900
"The R.G.W. will have a photo taken of 401 and 04 side by side. No. 401 represents the Western of 1900 and 04 the Denver & Rio Grande Western of twenty years ago." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 11, 1900)

July 26, 1900
"Engine 400 of the Western was expected in last night." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 26, 1900)

July 28, 1900
"Cafe car 500 is still on the side track at the Western depot." "The new 300 and 400 class engines are being used in the mountain district between Helper and Tucker." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 28, 1900)

July 28, 1900
"The passenger cars of the Western are still going through the paint shops, emerging in the new dress and color." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 28, 1900)

July 30, 1900
RGW operated first standard gauge train to Park City. The new line was built from Lambs Canyon over Parleys summit, gauge widened from Gogorza to Park City. The last narrow gauge train was operated on the July 29th. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 30, 1900; Park Record, August 4, 1900)

July 30, 1900
"The dining car 'Provo' goes into the shop for repairs upon her return from Denver." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 30, 1900)

August 5, 1900
"Lay Track Tomorrow" "'Tracklaying on the Marysvale extension will commence Monday,' remarked Col. D. C. Dodge last night in car A. 'At least,' he continued, 'all the material and men necessary are being sent down, and we hope to have the work started Monday..." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 5, 1900)

August 8, 1900
"The dining car 'Provo' went to the shops Monday for a general overhauling." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 8, 1900)

August 14, 1900
Tracklaying began yesterday at Belknap, on way to Marysvale. "No. 301 passed through here yesterday." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 14, 1900)

August 18, 1900
A wreck yesterday at Lehi on the R.G.W., as second No. 10, engine 33, hit the rear of first No. 10; damage, about $300. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 18, 1900)

August 24, 1900
"Tracklaying on the Marysvale extension of the R.G.W. is progressing nicely. About four miles are already down below Belknap. The extra rail of the Utah Central has all been taken up between Salt Lake and Barclay's and is being sent to Belknap as quickly as possible." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 24, 1900)

August 28, 1900
The track is within three miles of Marysvale. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, August 28, 1900)

September 4, 1900
Coach 100 about to be rebuilt into a business car for Chief Engineer Yard of the RGW. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 4, 1900)

September 4, 1900
Dodge says that the track to Marysvale should be completed now. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 4, 1900)

September 4, 1900
"Benefit the Stockmen" "The R.G.W. has in contemplation a plan which is original and will be a great boon to the big live-stock shippers. When a train of livestock is shipped the owners usually send several attendants and feeders along to look after the stock. The ordinary caboose is only large enough to accommodate the train crew, and on such trips it is crowded. The Western, as soon as it can do so, will convert passenger cars 70, 71, 101 and 140 into special cars for the stockmen. They will be fitted up with bunks, dining table and kitchen, and in this way the shippers of stock can go along with their train and be comfortable at the same time." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 4, 1900)

September 4, 1900
"The car shops of the R. G. W. will turn out in a day or so the diner 'Provo.' A fine job has been made and the car is greatly improved. A new vestibule has been placed in one end with a diagonal passageway, so passengers can enter the rear end of the car without seeing the kitchen at the other end, and a useless washstand has been converted into cigar lockers. The car comes out in the new color and lettering." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 4, 1900)

September 9, 1900
Henry Schlacks, Supt. of Machinery on the D&RG -- two of his sons are: Joseph T. Schlacks who is now made division master mechanic at Helper; and Charles H. Schlacks, who is general manager of the Colorado Midland. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 9, 1900)

September 11, 1900
"The 'Provo' diner came out yesterday in a beautiful new dress." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 11, 1900)

September 24, 1900
"The diner 'salt Lake' is now in the Rio Grande Western shops." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, September 24, 1900)

October 1900
Sevier Valley Railway completed line from Salina to Marysvale. (Wilson, p. 97)

(LeMassena, p. 109, says that RGW completed six miles of standard gauge from Belknap to Marysvale in 1900.)

October 9, 1900
"Two more cabooses are to be built in the Western's shops." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 9, 1900)

October 9, 1900
The R.G.W. has begun grading at Elgin on the main line for the new Utah Central "cut-off" line, and are putting in a wye at Elgin. (Ed. note: This is the current location of Roper Yard.) (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 9, 1900)

October 12, 1900
RGW Timetable No. 48 went into effect last midnight. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 12, 1900)

October 12, 1900
"The diner 'Ogden' is ready to leave the shops. The 'Salt Lake' will be the next to go through." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 12, 1900)

October 13, 1900
"The car shops of the R.G.W. are record-breakers when it comes to building cabooses." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 13, 1900)

October 13, 1900
"The new passenger engines of the Western will be of the 80 class, and the new freights of the 500 class." "Set-out engine No. 13 is out of the Western shops. It was formerly No. 3 of the Central, and will be used on the Heber or Sevier branch." "Schenectady switcher No. 22 has been placed in service on the Rio Grande Western. No. 23 is being built." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 13, 1900)

October 14, 1900
R.G.W. graders are at work below 12th south near the State street crossing. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 14, 1900)

October 23, 1900
"The diner 'Salt Lake' is now in the paint shop." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 23, 1900)

October 25, 1900
"A comfortable bunk car for the locating engineers is being made of the former Utah Central coach no. 100. A draughting-room, office, berths, dining room and kitchen will be arranged." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 25, 1900)

November 3, 1900
New Pullman cars just placed in service on the Denver -- Ogden run, apparently of 12 section and 1 drawing room design; names are as follows: Islington, Lyonton, Leighton, and Quinten. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 3, 1900)

November 10, 1900
"The Rio Grande Western live-stockmen's special cars are ready to emerge from the shop. They are numbered 350, 351 and 352, and named appropriately Bovine, Toro and Vaca. The cars are in the new standard color and Colorado - Utah line lettering. Inside, they have cook stoves, lunch table, berths and card tables. The cars are to be used for owners and attendants of train loads of cattle going down to the river markets." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 10, 1900)

November 10, 1900
"The business car for the Rio Grande Western engineering department is nearly completed, and the workmanship of the interior shows what clever artisans there are in the local shops. The rear of the car has an office and draughting table with lockers for blueprints and maps. Berths and seats are combined on the Pullman plan, with room for seven persons. A kitchen is in the forward end, with cupboards, sink, range, boiler and other conveniences. The car will be of standard color and lettering, and probably be known as 'C'." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 10, 1900)

November 11, 1900
The RGW is changing over to Tower automatic couplers. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 11, 1900)

December 3, 1900
The R.G.W. orders five compound 2-8-0 engines from Richmond, and 100 box cars from AC&F. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 3, 1900)

December 7, 1900
"The three drover's cars of the Rio Grande Western are ready for service. The first one went out last night with the Payson train." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 7, 1900)

December 11, 1900
"Another Car Order" by the R.G.W., of 50 stock cars, also AC&F. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 11, 1900)

December 11, 1900
"Will be Steep Grade" when the RGW extends its line from Bingham to the mines of the Bingham Copper & Gold Mining Company, three miles up the canyon. "For the first two miles beyond Bingham the present grade of the company's three-foot gauge tramway will be used as far as practicable. Beyond that point the work will be new." "It is to be standard gauge and operated with a Shay engine." (ed. note: This is the Copper Belt Railroad) (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 11, 1900)

December 15, 1900
Rio Grande Western operated its largest coal train to date, thirty-six cars with 1,000 tons of coal was shipped east from the Sunnyside No. 3 mine. (Salt Lake Tribune, December 17, 1900)

December 19, 1900
"Cars A, B and E are in the Rio Grande Western shops. The two first named for a general overhauling and the latter being nearly rebuilt. Car B is having 11,000 pounds of ballast put in and six wheel trucks will be used." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 19, 1900)

December 20, 1900
The R.G.W. is trying out an electric headlight of Pyle-National pattern on engines 29 and 40. The dynamo is located back of the sand done. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 20, 1900)

December 27, 1900
The RGW orders more cars, 100 each of box, flat and gondola cars and 40 Goodwin dump cars; "And last, but not least, one more palatial dining car has been ordered. This will make four diners and one cafe car owned by the company. The cafe car is still at Salt Lake, out of service, but a place will be found for it soon." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 27, 1900)

December 30, 1900
Review of 1900: "The Rio Grande Western three-mile extension at Bingham will be known as the Copper Belt Railroad and will be operated by J. G. Jacobs." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 30, 1900)

1901
Copper Belt Railroad leased (and converted to standard gauge) the three-mile long old RGW narrow gauge tramway from Bingham to the Old Jordan and Commercial mines in Bingham Canyon. Copper Belt later, in 1905, acquired title to the line in exchange turning over its stock to D&RG (not RGW). (LeMassena, p. 111)

January 4, 1901
"Railroad Notes." "Car A is out of the western's shops and goes East . today. Car B will be out by the 12th, looking like new with its standard color and lettering. It has been equipped with new six-wheel trucks and ballasted with five tons of steel." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 4, 1901)

January 8, 1901
Nathaniel W. Raphael vs. the Wasatch & Jordan Valley Railroad Co., the Rio Grande Western Railway Co., and the Union Trust Co. of New York -- complaint alleges that on May 1, 1879, the W. & J. V. RR. conveyed to said Trust company (to secure $1,200,000 in mortgage bonds), all of the main line (33 miles) and tramway lines (11-1/2 miles) from Bingham to Alta via Sandy; further alleges the property was foreclosed for default and came into possession of the R.G.W. through collusion and fraud. Plaintiff asks that sale to D.& R.G.W. Rwy. Co. and all subsequent actions be set aside! Paper comments that "The line from Sandy to Wasatch and Alta, however, is worthless, and has been abandoned by the company for a long time, as far as operation of it as a railroad is concerned." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 8, 1901)

January 15, 1901
Castle Valley Railway (second) incorporated by RGW interests to build east from Salina, over Salina Pass, to a point in Castle Valley. (Utah corporation index 3028)

January 31, 1901
"Railroad Notes." "Engines 500 and 501 of the Rio Grande Western are in service between Helper and Grand Junction. They are of the last order, and all the new engines will soon be mere." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, January 31, 1901)

February 12, 1901
"Will Lay Track Next Week." "It is expected that the steel gang will commence laying track on the Twelfth South street cut-off of the Park City line next week, as the work at Bingham will be finished. It will only take a week or ten days to finish the cut-off, and in a very short time the track will be taken up from Eighth and Ninth South and along Eleventh East streets." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 12, 1901)

February 14, 1901
A sketch published of the RGW shops and roundhouse layout. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 14, 1901)

February 26, 1901
"Work will be commenced in a few days on track laying for the Utah Central cut-off. The steel is piled up at Roper, where the cut-off leaves the main line." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 26, 1901)

February 26, 1901
"Several mail and baggage cars are being considerably altered in the Western's shop." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 26, 1901)

February 27, 1901
"Talks with Travelers." "It has been raining for several weeks between Thistle and Manti," said Engineer Beless of the Rio Grande Western yesterday..." "Heavy engines are running to Manti, but be low there the smaller set-out engines are used." "The old Vauclain compounds are being altered over into Richmond compounds, with the high-pressure cylinder on one side and the low-pressure cylinder on the other." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, February 27, 1901)

March 1, 1901
Track on the cut-off is nearly done, as it is now laid as far as Ninth East. Once done, the present line along the canal will come up. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 1, 1901)

March 2, 1901
"Features of New Line." The cut-off to be completed tonight; meets present line in back of the prison, about 1/2 mile east of 11th East street. New line crosses 11th East 1/2 block below Smoot's corner. The line is laid with 65 pound steel. "The present narrow gauge track to Mill Creek will be torn up and a broad-gauge line substituted." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 2, 1901)

March 6, 1901
New R.G.W. dining car "Colorado" has arrived. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 6, 1901)

March 7, 1901
Two of the new 80 class passenger engines have arrived at the Rio Grande Western roundhouse (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 7, 1901)

March 11, 1901
Contrary to item of March 2nd, connection of cut-off has not yet been made; is not known yet when will be done. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 11, 1901)

March 11, 1901
R.G.W. train 4 last night had dining car "Colorado" and car A. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 11, 1901)

March 19, 1901
RGW completed a new section of the Park City Branch, connecting with the old branch at the Utah state penitentiary in Sugar House. The new line ran along 12th South (now 21st South). Construction began in November 1900. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 13, 1900)

March 19, 1901
"Last Trains Today" over the old 8th South line; once the morning passenger train to Park City (Train No. 42) passes, the line will be cut, and the new line connected, behind the prison. The old line, along 8th South and down 11th East as far as Garfield Ave, will be taken up at once. Trains have heretofore stopped at Liberty Park, but now, quite obviously, will no longer do so. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 19, 1901)

March 23, 1901
The Salt Lake City Land and Water Commissioner reported to the city committee on irrigation, that the Rio Grande Western has stopped the removal of its old line along Eighth South and Ninth South at a point just north of the crossing of the city canal at Garfield Avenue, providing a short spur north of the Sugar House station. The commissioner recommended that the full city council request that the railroad shorten its line between Garfield Avenue and Sugar House by a few rods, and remove the bridge across the canal. (Salt Lake Herald, March 23, 1901)

March 26, 1901
Item dated at New York on 25th: Sale of the R.G.W. to the D&RG (which is to say Gould) is confirmed. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 26, 1901)

March 31, 1901
R. G. W. board has approved sale of road to D. & R. G. company. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 31, 1901)

May 1901
D&RG bought RGW and Utah Fuel Company for $15 million. (Athearn, p. 195) George Gould in full control of entire Rio Grande "System". (Athearn, p. 196)

June 14, 1901
All six seats on RGW board are replaced by Gould interests and D&RG president Jeffery replaced Palmer as president of RGW. (Wilson, pp. 108, 109)

July 1, 1901
D&RG gained full control of RGW by stock transfer. (LeMassena, pp. 76, 111)

July 18, 1901
"New Trademark" for the RGW, in the form of the familiar D&RG one, of Curecanti Needle, except the RGW has Castle Gate, 'Rio Grande Western Ry." around the outside circle, and the banner says 'Great Salt Lake Route'; "The first electrotype of the new design is printed herewith." (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 18, 1901)

July 30, 1901
The new herald, as above, has been applied to the City Ticket Office window. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, July 30, 1901)

1902
D&RG owned 99.8 percent of RGW, and RGW ceased to operate separately from D&RG. (LeMassena, p. 111)

1902
RGW resumed work on the Castle Valley Railway line from Salina, over Salina Pass to Nioche, as a short cut to beat UP's OSL in a connection with the planned San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad. (LeMassena, p. 111)

1902
RGW completed a one-mile spur to serve the U. P. coal mine, above Scofield. (LeMassena, p. 111)

March 3, 1902
Western Pacific Railway organized to build from Salt Lake City to Oakland. (Athearn, p. 200) Construction work began in the fall of 1905, after Gould saddled the Rio Grande roads with debt of construction of WP. (Athearn, p. 207, 208)

May 19, 1902
'New Engine Here', being No. 809; in item reference is made to Engine No. 102, old Utah Central engine, now in snow plow service. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 19, 1902)

May 22, 1902
RGW car 'B' is in for overhaul, repainting, etc.; will emerge from the shops as the car 'Wasatch'. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, May 22, 1902)

June 18, 1902
RGW Coach 213 has been rebuilt with a Pullman vestibule, the first of such rebuilds, but not the last. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 18, 1902)

June 29, 1902
RGW engine 12 still in service, in this case helping to block the OSL from crossing an RGW track in SLC. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, June 29, 1902)

October 2, 1902
RGW's car 'Nomad' is now being rebuilt at Burnham, will come out as the car 'Denver' when done. Cars on the Utah end are 'Utah', 'Salt Lake', 'Provo', 'Wasatch' and 'Ogden'. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, October 2, 1902)

December 4, 1902
RGW cafe car 500 is now dining car 'Pueblo'. (Salt Lake Daily Tribune, December 4, 1902)

1903
RGW interests organize the Castle Valley Railway in January 1901 to build from Salina, on the Marysvale Branch, east to the Castle Valley. Twenty miles of the route were completed in 1903, from Salina to Nioche, including four new tunnels. (Utah incorporation index 3028; LeMassena, p. 111) During 1904, the line was washed out in several places and would remain only partially completed for several years. (LeMassena, p. 115)

According to LeMassena, Rio Grande to the Pacific, pages 263-264, the Castle Valley Railway was organized "to build a cutoff between Farnham (on the main-line) and Salina (on the Marysvale Branch), thence perhaps to Milford (on the SPLA&SL railroad), all in Utah. The 1902 Annual Report contains this intriguing comment:

The Castle Valley cutoff on the RGW was commenced last spring. The surveys and location were completed and a contract was let for 21 miles of grading. The cutoff will extend from Farnham to Salina, a distance of 116 miles, and when completed will afford a route 38 miles shorter than the present one to Southwestern Utah. Important coalfields in the vicinity of Salina Canyon and in contiguous districts can be opened up and the coal made avail-able for commercial use to meet the growing demands for Utah fuel. The construction of the cutoff will be prosecuted from time to time according to the requirements of the various classes of traffic which it is believed can be developed in the territory to be traversed.

LeMassena goes on to say, "The 1903 Report stated that 21 miles of the CV had been completed; that it was not contemplated to extend the CV during the current year; and that $400,000 of RGW bonds were issued to pay for the work. Never again was the CV mentioned in a D&RG Annual Report, and its actual status is open to inquiry. Was it to be a cutoff, affording a shorter route to the coast? If so, its severe gradients and curvature were not of main-line calibre. Was it to open up coal deposits? If so, the line was built in the wrong location. If it were important, why were its objectives and completion so indefinite? The timing of the CV's birth, and the peculiarities of its brief active existence, are highly suggestive that the CV may have been used by Gould to cover his preliminary Western Pacific activities."

1903
RGW added a second track to its 10 miles of mainline between Salt Lake City and Bingham Junction (later known as Midvale). (LeMassena, p. 111)

November 3, 1903
RGW bought the "Dalton & Lark Railroad" from Bingham Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company. The mining company had begun construction of the spur in October 1901 at Reese on the RGW's Bingham Branch and continued to the lower portal of the mining company's Dalton & Lark Drain Tunnel. The spur was completed in January 1902 and was operated by the mining company with a Shay locomotive. (26 ICC 809; Engineering & Mining Journal, July 24, 1902, p. 59; Destiny, p. 273) The line was four miles of standard gauge railroad. (LeMassena, p. 111)

1905
RGW built the Hooper Branch from Hooper Junction (later known as Roy) west to Hooper, five miles of new construction. (LeMassena, p. 115)

January 1, 1905
D&RG (not RGW) took control of Copper Belt Railroad. (26 ICC 927) The Copper Belt had been completed in February 1901 (construction began in November 1900) by the owners of the Bingham Copper & Gold Mining Company. In April 1901 the mining company was reorganized as the Bingham Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company, partly to finance the organization (on May 18, 1901) and purchase of the Copper Belt Railroad. (Engineering News, July 24, 1902, p. 59; Engineering & Mining Journal, May 4, 1901 p. 572; USGS Professional Paper 38, p. 99)

November 1905
RGW completed Garfield Branch, from Garfield Junction (later Welby) on the Bingham Branch to the site of the Garfield smelter. Construction had begun in August. Sixteen miles of new construction. (Salt Lake Mining Review, August 15, 1905, p. 31; October 30, 1911, p. 18; LeMassena, p. 115)

1906
RGW built the new "Low Grade" line in Bingham Canyon, 12 miles of new construction. To connect its existing trackage at Bingham with the new line, the road converted to standard gauge, two miles of trackage from Bingham to Copper Belt Junction, further up the canyon. (LeMassena, p. 115)

1906
RGW added a second track to seven miles of its mainline between Colton and Soldier Summit, on the east side of the hill. (LeMassena, p. 115)

1906
RGW made an agreement with Continental Mines & Smelters for that company to lease and reconstruct the Alta Branch. The reconstruction work was never undertaken and the lease was revoked. (LeMassena, p. 115)

May 1906
Rio Grande Western purchased land for its new joint shops (with Western Pacific) in Salt Lake City. The property was a portion of the "old Church Farms". (Deseret News, May 8, 1906) Location was within sections 23, 24 and 26 of T1SR1W. (The location is between today's 200 South and 400 South along 700 West in Salt Lake City)

September 1906
Newspapers announced that Gould was about to build west from the D&RG at either Salina or Marysvale. The new road would cross the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake near Milford, then strike for the Pioche country. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, September 6, 1906, p. 1, "Gould To Build South Of Price")

January 2, 1907
RGW operated the first train over the new "Low Grade Line" into Bingham Canyon. (Salt Lake Mining Review, October 30, 1911, p. 18) Surveys had begun in July 1905 (Salt Lake Mining Review, July 30, 1905, p. 31) and construction was begun in April 1906. (1909 Bingham Commercial Club souvenir booklet) In September the shovels of the Utah Construction Company hit copper ore while excavating for the line. (Salt Lake Mining Review, September 15, 1906, p. 39)

1907
RGW bought the San Pete Valley Railway, from Nephi to Manti. (LeMassena, p. 115)

August 1907
The mortgage was foreclosed on RGW's Bingham Branch. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 22, 1907, p. 5)

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