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Tooele Valley Railway (1908-1982)

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This page was last updated on February 11, 2012.

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Overview

(Seven miles, total of 9.42 miles, 7 steam locomotives, 2 diesel locomotives; AAR reporting mark TOV)

Gordon Cardall wrote the following about the Tooele Valley Railway:

They apparently had four cabooses but not all at one time. They came down the hill from International, locomotive first, thru town and down to the interchange with the W.P. and the U.P.at Warner,Utah. They came back up thru town, caboose first, with the brakeman standing on the platform, the headlight on the deck, horn on the roof, a rope in one hand, his other on the brake valve. In visiting their line a few times, I saw they had quite a collection of two-bay hoppers. They were in bad shape paint-wise, all just dirty black, well-used and mickey-moused number on the step sill.

Timeline

November 18, 1908
Tooele Valley Railway was incorporated in Utah on November 18, 1908 (corporate information here).

January 1909
News item about the beginning of grading of the Tooele Valley Railway. (Salt Lake Mining Review, Volume 10, number 20, January 30, 1909, p.26)

April 1, 1909
First train operated over Tooele Valley Railway, using SPLA&SL locomotive 3605, operated to Middle Canyon trestle. (Mining, Smelting and Railroading in Tooele County, page 72)

October 15, 1909
Tooele Valley Railway commenced operation. The railroad operated 6.235 miles of line between Tooele Junction and International, along with 1.698 miles of yard tracks and sidings. maxiumu grade was 2.4 percent, and maxiumu curvature was 14 degrees. The railroad was incorporated on November 18, 1908; construction began on November 18, 1908 and the railroad was opened for operation on October 15, 1909. The construction was fully financed by International Smelting Co., which also furnished substantially all of the railroad's freight consignments. (Interstate Commerce Commission, Valuation Reports Volume 110, Valuation Docket 9, pages 310-322)

July 14, 1910
First ore was received at the International smelter, by way of the aerial tramway from Highland Boy. The tram was 20,000 feet long and was constructed to transport ores from the Utah Deleware Mining Co. in Highland Boy in Bingham Canyon. (Mining, Smelting and Railroading in Tooele County, page 72)

Ore arrived at the Tooele smelter by three methods: the 20,000 feet long aerial tramway of Utah Consolidated that traversed the ridge from Bigham Canyon; the 11,000 feet long tunnel of Utah Metals Company between its Bingham property and an outlet just two miles from the Tooele smelter; and the Tooele Valley Railway that operated between International and a connection with Union Pacific at Tooele Junction (later Warner), west of Tooele. The railroad connection allowed lead-zinc-silver ores (known as galena ore) and concentrates to be shipped in from all over the west, and for shipment of concentrates and smelted metals to refineries nationwide. Ores that arrived via the aerial tramway was dumped into railroad cars and moved to nearby sampler bins for storage and later processing.

March 1, 1911
Construction started on a new lead smelter. While the original smelter had been constructed for copper, the supply of copper ore from the Utah Consolidated mine in Bingham Canyon dropped severely in 1910. A new lead smelter was constructed using much of the existing machinery from the copper smelter. The International smelter stopped processing copper completely in 1946, but continued to process lead (and zinc) until 1971. (Mining, Smelting and Railroading in Tooele County, page 75)

December 1916
News item about Utah Construction Company having been awarded the contract to build the Western Pacific's Tooele Branch. (Salt Lake Mining Review, Volume 18, number 17, December 15, 1916, p.34, "Trade Notes")

Mid 1920s
By this time the International smelter had become a custom smelter, processing copper and lead contrates and ores from Bingham, Park City, Tintic, nearby bauer, an from Idaho. At times there were 85 to 90 rail cars from all over the west, unloading at the smelter's rail yards. (Mining, Smelting and Railroading in Tooele County, page 74)

April 11, 1925:
Tooele Valley Railway was approved to receive $30,343.81 from the U. S. government as settlement for the period of time that the railroad was under the control of USRA, from April 1, 1918 to February 29, 1920. The railroad operated 7.27 miles of track, from Warner to International, Utah. ICC Finance Docket 3052. (94 ICC 757) (Research done on August 22, 1988)

April 1926
A full description and valuation of Tooele Valley Railway was completed for the federal Interstate Commerce Commission in April 1926. This description included two new locomotives built in 1910, two secondhand locomotives built about 1893, along with 60 freight cars (which it does not use, being rented to International Smelting Company), and seven passenger cars. (Interstate Commerce Commission, Valuation Reports Volume 110, Valuation Docket 9, pages 310-322)

1937
Tooele Valley Railway completed a 2.33 mile branchline to serve the transportation of personnel and materials for the construction of Elton Tunnel, being built by National Tunnel & Mines Company. The branchline connected with the mainline at a point about three miles west of International, which itself was about five miles east of Tooele. (Utah Public Service Commission Case 2444)

August 21, 1941
The Elton Tunnel was formally opened during a ceremony on August 21, 1941. The tunnel was named for J. O. Elton, General Manager of International Smelting and Refining Company, and its National Tunnel and Mines Company subsidiary which built the tunnel. The tunnel was 24,000 feet long (about 4.5 miles) and took four years to complete. (Deseret News, August 21, 1941)

In August 1941, the Elton Tunnel opened as a way to transport the ore from the mines in Carr Fork, underground through the 4.5 mile tunnel, to a spur on the Tooele valley Railway for shipment to the International smelter. (click here for more information about the Elton Tunnel)

September 5, 1941
Tooele Valley Railway was given regulatory approval to discontinue passenger service. With the completion of Elton Tunnel in early September 1941, the railroad projected an increase of freight traffic between the portal of the tunnel and the International smelter. Continued operation of passenger trains would interfere with the projected increase of freight trains. A motor carrier (J. W. Wells, doing business as Tooele-International Bus Company) was planning to offer passenger service over the adjacent highway, including a planned additon of 375 persons between Tooele and the Elton Tunnel. (Utah Public Service Commission Case 2444)

Non-common carrier passenger operations continued until 1946, with the operation of daily smelter shift trains between Tooele and the smelter, solely for smelter employees. (See Mining, Smelting and Railroading in Tooele County, pages 114-119)

September 1941
Operation began on what was called the Slag Treatment Plant to extract the zinc content from the slag dumps that had accumulated over the past 30 years. The Slag Treatment Plant continued in operation until early 1972. (Mining, Smelting and Railroading in Tooele County, page 77, 79)

June 1943
"During last week..." all three of Tooele Valley's 2-8-0 steam locomotives were used for the first tme to pull a train of 17 loaded ore cars and a caboose up a 2.4 percent grade, from the UP connection at Warner, east to the International smelter. Operation of all three locomotives on a single train had previously been blocked by weight limitations of the "Middle Canyon fill". The wooden trestle was filled in using waste rock from the digging of the Elton Tunnel. (Salt Lake Telegram, June 16, 1943, with photo)

October 4, 1948
The holdings of the National Tunnel and Mines company were sold at auction October 4, to the Anaconda Copper Company for $500,000. The properties, including the Elton tunnel, buildings and more than 5000 acres of patented mining claims, had been estimated to have a value of $6,000,000. The 23,000-foot tunnel, running eastward from Tooele to connect with the workings of the Apex and Highland mines on the Bingham side of the Oquirrh mountains, was completed in 1941. In addition to draining 2500 gallons of water per minute from the mines, 800,000 tons of ore were moved through the tunnel during World War II. When government subsidies on copper and lead were dropped, it was said, the ore was not of high enough grade to pay for its mining. (Desert Magazine, December 1948, citing the Salt Lake City Tribune)

1957
Tooele Valley Ry. purchased a former D&RGW 01100-series wooden caboose in 1957. Purchase price of $795.60 for the caboose and, in addition, paid $8.20 for inspection, $22.40 for freight, and preparation for service costs of $295.80 for labor and $51.40 for supplies. (information from Tooele Valley Railway records, ICC Completion Records, courtesy of Larry Deppe)

January 28, 1972
The smelter of International Smelting and Refining Company was scheduled to close on January 1, 1972, but reduced production work continued for another three weeks. On January 28, 1972, the Tooele Valley Railway made its last run between the smelter and the interchange at Warner. Throughout its history, the railroad had made the trip at least twice daily. The last trip was made with only a single boxcar and a caboose. The boxcar had been used to bring the last load of newsprint paper for the Tooele Transcript newspaper. (Tooele Transcript, February 11, 1972)

When the Tooele smelter closed, it left over 30 mining properties without a nearby smelter. These mines were forced to close due the high costs of shipment of their ores to the nearest custom smelters at El Paso, Texas, East Helena, Mont., or Kellogg, Idaho. (Mining, Smelting and Railroading in Tooele County, page 111, citing Deseret News of November 9 and 13, 1971)

The smelter was closed to save costs to Anaconda following the loss of its properties in Chile, which were taken over by the Chilean government in 1971. To save the company, its unprofitable properties were either closed or sold. The sell-off did not work, and by 1975, Anaconda was purchased by Atlantic Richfield. (Mining, Smelting and Railroading in Tooele County, page 118)

(click here for a separte page about the end of lead, zinc, and silver smelting in Utah)

Operations continued after the smelter was closed. Until about 1975, the railroad was used to ship outgoing scrap from the dismantling of the smelter, and until 1981, the railroad was used to accept inbound shipments of construction materials for the development of the new Carr Fork Mine. (Mining, Smelting and Railroading in Tooele County, page 118)

1980
Tooele Valley Railway ceased operations in 1980. Offically abandoned by owner Anaconda Copper in August 1981. (Extra 2200 South, Issue 80, May 1984, page 33; Pacific News, Issue 233, January 1982, page 24)

July 7, 1980
Tooele Valley Railway ended its operation as a freight railroad. A last boxcar was moved from the Tooele freight depot to the connection at Warner. (email from James Belmont, dated February 9, 2012; photo)

August 1981
Tooele Valley Railway ceased operations in August 1981. TV SW900 no. 104 in storage on SLG&W at Salt Lake City. (Pacific News, Issue 242, October 1982, page 21)

August 28, 1982
Tooele Valley operation ceased on August 26, 1982. (information from Larry Deppe; The Mixed Train, September 1982, page 14)

Map

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